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Nigan

Car Survivor

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Posted (edited)

Hello everyone,,

Much has been written about the importance of vetting and maintaining original survivor cars. Throughout the 90's I began to see the shocking trend of street rodding and restoring beautiful cars, which to my eyes needed nothing.

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In my collection I have a number of all original survivors. What become obvious, early on, was that at a car show, no matter how good they looked, they were being overlooked by the casual show goer. Even though the original paint was still as factory applied, and still shined, and the interiors were near perfect, as came from the factory, they would never look as good as a restored car. My days of having my cars judged are mostly behind me. For myself I don't care, but I thought that the cars deserved better then what they were getting. I mitigated this a bit by including the car's story when I displayed them. The response has been very gratifying. Real car people get it, all they need is to understand that they are looking at an original car, not just a poorly done restoration, from thirty years ago. I also think that more car shows should provide a place where cars of this kind, can be displayed together, and where they can be appreciated for what they are.

 

 I believe that the people with their original survivors, would benefit from a dedicated portion of the AACA form where they could post pictures and tell their stories. I think it might help to give these cars and their owners their place in the sun. What say you?

Edited by Nigan (see edit history)
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More eyes see stuff in the general forum than in a sub forum many never make it to.  I know I often never check the subforums,  just for lack of time.   I have also used the unread content feature but it seems to be flawed and doesn't pick up all unread content.  

I can say that some Survivors being 25 to 30  year old cars,  just don't generate alot of interest no matter what they are. They are still like used car to many of us.   It's not because they aren't nice or deserving,  they just don't have the following.  

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Posted (edited)

My 1937 Ford is often overlooked at Cruise Nights and the local fast food "car shows."  If it is not a GM powered muscle car from the 60s, many people tend to walk right past.  I like to park with the Model A guys if there are no Early Ford V-8s around.  They appreciate my 1937 Ford survivor (in storage for about 50 years before I brought it back to life).    

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Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)
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Quote

Throughout the 90's I began to see the shocking trend of street rodding and restoring beautiful cars, which to my eyes needed nothing. 

 

I've tended to be tolerant (even appreciative) of hot rodders because they were saving ordinary cars (like Model T's  and Model A's) from scrap heaps/recycling on a large scale before most other people were. OTOH, Hot Rod Magazine or some other publication had an article 10 or 15 years ago where they took an almost pristine and original low mileage mid-60's 2 door hardtop Chevelle and butchered the heck out of it (because, as every teenager knows, any two door V8 powered Chevy from the 60's is a dragster waiting to happen.) I was almost sick. The article shouldn't have described how nice the car was before they "improved" it. I guess it was kind of a confession.

 

I have a survivor Merc that has an aluminum radiator, a tranny cooler and radial tires that make the car more usable, but required no permanent modifications to the car - not even a drilled hole - and original parts can be reinstalled. I'd love to take it to an all survivor show, if such a thing exists, rather than competing for attention against the beautifully restored cars or creatively constructed street rods (which I enjoy.) Don't know of any shows like that around here, though (midwest.)

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

More eyes see stuff in the general forum than in a sub forum many never make it to. 

 

I don't pay any attention to what forum is what.   I just look at the "unread content" (upper right corner) which lists every thread in the entire place that has a new post from most recent to oldest.   Everybody should read the forum that way.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)
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41 minutes ago, Nigan said:

...In my collection I have a number of all original survivors. What become obvious, early on, was that at a car show, no matter how good they looked, they were being overlooked by the casual show goer....

 

Preserve history because YOU like it.  You're doing a good job.

Some things may be popular, some may not, but don't be

concerned about popularity.  Some people might walk past

an original 1958 Rambler American, for instance, to ogle a

perfectly restored 1957 Chevrolet Bel Air;  but the few people

that want to see something different will be really glad to

see that original Rambler and thank you for preserving it!

 

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I’ve been to a few shows where many people are looking at the modified muscle cars or the Barrett-Jackson style resto-modified as if they are seeing a TV star in real life.  The cars with a history of originality or proper restoration don’t get near the attention.  To this reaction credit a lack of knowledge or interest about automotive history and the efforts that go in to preserving said history.  I agree that a little shared knowledge goes a long way in helping others understand what they are looking at. For my bone stock 1964 Plymouth survivor and my 1964 Vespa survivor I always had a little info card attached so that the viewer had a better understanding of why the vehicles looked as they did and the history they represented.

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2 hours ago, alsancle said:

 

I don't pay any attention to what forum is what.   I just look at the "unread content" (upper right corner) which lists every thread in the entire place that has a new post from most recent to oldest.   Everybody should read the forum that way.

There is a flaw in the system though and often threads are missed as are new posts.  Though I use the Unread content as you mentioned most,  Once in a while I scan down through a few of the subforums to see what got missed.  Sometimes it's a thread with 10 posts and none showed up under unread.  

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2 hours ago, Nigan said:

I think it might help to give these cars and their owners their place in the sun.

 

You can "give them a place in the sun" but don't expect that will change anyone's appreciation of what "you" like. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. There are types or eras of collector cars that have a big following and that put others to sleep. In other words dance with who brung you and don't worry about anyone else.........Bob

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Posted (edited)

Want to be ignored at a car show, take a 1980 Plymouth Volare 4 door sedan. Only one time did a woman come up to talk to me and only because she had one and told me how her Dad sold it while she was away at school. Enjoyed the story but it can be lonely out there.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)
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