TexRiv_63

1966 Dodge Monaco Wagon A/C Resurrection

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On ‎4‎/‎28‎/‎2019 at 11:08 AM, Roger Zimmermann said:

Oh boy! This is something I would never undertake myself. You must have a minimum of knowledge to do that.

I installed a complete Vintage Air system on a 1963 Riviera about 13 years ago so I'm not a total newbie. I am new to the flushing and charging process though so we shall see.

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I have backed the car into the rear bay of my tandem garage, this will be its home for awhile. I covered the floor with plastic as I will be doing some underhood cleaning and painting while I have things disassembled. I am just starting the teardown, yesterday I made this sketch on a yellow pad to help figure out which hose fittings I needed to buy . I am a maker of lists so I have an overall project checklist, parts list, fittings list, etc. I've always done this with car projects but it is more helpful now that I am advancing in years. Using the sketch I ordered all the fittings including the ones marked "alternate" plus a few spares on top of that, they are surprisingly inexpensive. I will not order the new barrier hose until I have the condenser and compressor actually mounted so I can get good measurements.

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That garage is wwwaaaayyyyy too neat to actually do work in it!😯

 

 

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16 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

That garage is wwwaaaayyyyy too neat to actually do work in it!😯

 

 

That garage has evolved over the years. When we first moved in in 2000 the end where you see the car had a laundry sink, shelving across the end and two rows of shelving on the floor, stacked boxes and a lawn mower - no room for a car. Later when I graduated to owning two hobby cars at the same time I finally built a large storage shed and cleaned everything out. You can see what it looked like in the picture below. I've actually done a lot of work in there but nothing big like engine swaps or painting - those days are over for me.

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On Friday I pulled the large suction and high side lines with the mufflers and removed the RV2 compressor. That compressor mounting is an amazing bit of Chrysler engineering - bolted to a massive cast iron bracket attached to the engine at three points PLUS 2 large top braces bolted to the intake PLUS a steel bracket attached to the exhaust manifold PLUS 2 steel struts bolted to the water pump housing! When that 60 lb. pile of steel was removed I now have plenty of room to work on the top of the engine... I've been told Chrysler overdesigned the mounting because the "V" style compressor had more inherent vibration than the GM axial styles.

 

So far all of the lines and fittings I have disconnected look clean and still have the original black R12 O-rings in place. Contrary to what a lot of people say they held the R134 quite well. We will see the whole story later when I start flushing pieces out.

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Teardown is almost complete. I was very lucky, all the a/c fittings came apart with no problems. It is a pleasure to work on a rust free car (this one spent its life in southern California and Las Vegas). All the fasteners came out with no drama and while there is plenty of grease and dirt there is no corrosion to deal with.

It never fails, I started thinking I would just replace the parts.. then I decided to do a little cleanup and maybe some touchup paint.. then I removed the grille to get more room to work.. then I took off everything on the front of the motor.. now I will be taking off everything loose, cleaning most everything under the hood and detail painting the engine before installing the new a/c stuff. Never fails...

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When you are at this or that, you can remove the bumper, front fenders and so on and do a complete overhauling!

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The old "as long as your at it" problem. Everyone knows it around here!!!

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It was not my original intention but it looks like this has turned into an engine detailing thread before it will get back to being an A/C update one. I have everything stripped off the top and front of the engine, the distributor and alternator will also leave. My next step is to flush out the evaporator and get that messy step done before I start cleaning and degreasing.

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Posted (edited)

Engine detailing?

 

FWIW for many years, Mopar engines were painted assembled, on the floor. The bottom of the oil pan is bare (I can't stand that and I always painted it). Balancer was on, thermostat housing was on, dipstick tube (and probably dipstick) was on, but pulleys, brackets carb and and alternator were not.

 

Some parts like the distributor, sending units, also probably the fuel pump and negative battery cable, had paint slopped up the side a little. On the smaller engines that have a bypass hose, they painted the hose and clamps. You will probably see this when you remove your distributor.

 

Under your intake manifold are one or two sound absorption pads. Probably two. Usually they are destroyed by mice. If there's anything left for a pattern, it is easy to make duplicates out of fiberglass insulation and heavy aluminum foil.

 

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)
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I'm probably overusing the word "detailing". I'm going to paint the top and front of the engine because the original paint is in poor shape and my degreasing efforts will make it worse. I will probably paint it mostly as you describe but in some ways I will improve on factory and get rid of the "slop". I will clean but not repaint any of the body color areas but I will repaint some of the black bolt on items and clean up the distributor and alternator. Nothing will be done underneath the car - out of sight out of mind. My sound absorption pads are still there and will stay.

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A few days ago I did the flushing process on the evaporator. I found a big bucket and attached an old heater hose to the larger fitting on the firewall. I used a flush gun setup connected to my air compressor which shot the flush solvent under 100 psi through the coil. As expected this was a very messy process but not due to the gunk inside as there really was none. The problem was my dumb use of duct tape to attach the hose plus a flush gun hose fitting not tightened correctly resulting in a solvent shower! When I got that under control I flushed it both ways and was pleased to see very little dirt and no visible metallic debris. I also flushed the lines I will reuse with similar results. Today I will start the engine cleanup prior to painting.

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Making slow progress, at least de-gunking the engine is done...one of my least favorite jobs. Started by scraping (see large pile on floor) then used Superclean, water rinse, more scraping, brake cleaner, even more scraping, more brake cleaner, finally ready for paint. I used a whole lot of aluminum foil and old sheets to mask then shot it with turquoise. I used the OEM Mopar P412075AB engine paint which was a very close match to the original. Next I will clean and flush the radiator and clean and paint the small parts then I can start putting it all back together.

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Looking good. I hate that cleaning also.

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More slow progress. I am working on reassembly, the carb, ignition and alternator plus wiring are on and I have set the compressor in place to contemplate how it will work with my power steering pump. This involves a long bolt and a pile of spacers and washers that goes through the front mounting bracket, power steering pump, water pump housing, p/s pump again and rear mounting bracket - all in such a way that the dual belts line up between compressor, crank pulley and alternator! I'll be doing the actual trial and error fitting later this week. While I had the distributor out I cleaned it up and replaced the points and condenser.

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Compressor mounting success! I used a mount kit from Bouchillon Performance Engineering designed to work with all my stock factory a/c alternator and p/s components and followed their detailed installation instructions. It went on very easily, I did have to play with the washer packs between the front bracket, p/s pump bracket and water pump housing passthru to get belt pulleys lined up right. In the end it is a good looking and very stable mount set and the original belts fit and line up great, thanks much to Bouchillon. Next will be mounting the new condenser.

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The car is mobile again! The new condenser has been mounted, radiator and cooling system back together, fluids in and it runs. I think the new points were needed, it started up so quickly I was surprised. I measured for and ordered the barrier hose, one additional fitting and a spare set of O-rings, which I hope to have within a week. My Grandson is visiting next week so I hope to get back to it the week after.

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Spent time with my grandson last week and did little on the car but I did take it for a short ride. Freakout time, it made a loud rumbling / grinding noise whenever I accelerated! I go into diagnostic mode - check all the fluids, check the belt clearances, check all the bolts, but still the noise is there when I took it out again this morning. I'm thinking the worst, then I noticed the clamp holding the smaller power steering hose to the inner fender is loose. I tightened the screw and drove it again - no noise at all!

 

I got all my hose and fittings so I will be getting back to it later in the week.

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