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Hi Charley,

bought car in NM 12 yrs ago, so thinking the limited pertains here................. I am in NJ. Think they are individually owned franchises..............

 

would like a new tank, but it is a 51 tin woody.

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21 hours ago, Tinindian said:

 

41KjexSR6qL._AC_UL130_.jpg

learn something new everyday.

I didn't know they made fuel tank sealer.

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I have two cars from early 30s     used Bill hirsh's     tank sealer        a long time ago             never had an issue

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I always replace but if I Cant then it will get dipped to remove rust and I 2nd the Caswell brand sealer.  Expensive but it's a true 2part epoxy sealer.  I like the Red version so you know when it's coated.  Looks just like the Maker's Mark wax dip.  

 

Hirsch has been used by people forever but I find it to be to thin.  I had one dipped and the guy used hirsch and it started leaking right away.  It didn't fill the pin holes that he missed with solder.    I know the Caswell would have sealed those defects.  

 

Never used Por tank sealer but I hope it works better than the magical rust cover garbage they sell.  

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We use RedKote which we purchase from our local PPG paint supplier.

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On 3/27/2019 at 2:08 PM, Janousek said:

I always replace but if I Cant then it will get dipped to remove rust and I 2nd the Caswell brand sealer.  Expensive but it's a true 2part epoxy sealer.  I like the Red version so you know when it's coated.  Looks just like the Maker's Mark wax dip.  

 

Hirsch has been used by people forever but I find it to be to thin.  I had one dipped and the guy used hirsch and it started leaking right away.  It didn't fill the pin holes that he missed with solder.    I know the Caswell would have sealed those defects.  

 

Never used Por tank sealer but I hope it works better than the magical rust cover garbage they sell.  

All i can say is that my 52 was undercoated and the inside of the cabin sealed with POR15 about 16 years ago and to this point no rust has returned.  I followed the instructions exactly.

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Posted (edited)

The externally-visible gas tank on my 1923 Hupmobile was having internal rust issues back when it was still my parents' car...and they passed in 1978. Of course things just got worse year after year. Twice over the early years that I first owned the car, I removed the tank, and carefully followed the instructions on two different well-known aftermarket "gas tank sealers." Eventually, both of them failed (it took a few years, but it happened nevertheless). So I took my tank off and shipped it off to that company which advertises in HEMMINGS, "Gas Tank Renu," I believe. When the tank was shipped back to me, it was badly warped and distorted, apparently from the heat of their ovens. Regardless, I just painted it and re-installed it...even though you could see the warped panels when installed. I was that desperate to be done with rust in my fuel system. Ugly as it was, it functioned ok....for about a year. Then one day the engine starting sputtering again, just like it used to do when it starved for fuel. I checked the clear inline filter, and sure enough it was full of rust specs again. I stuck a little mirror inside, and saw badly rusted areas, which must have been missed by the sealer those folks had used. 

 

Desperate, I had a brand new gas tank fabricated. It was made of stainless steel this time, and painted the correct factory black gloss with special paint designed for stainless. AT LAST, my rusty fuel system problems were over. 

 

To each his own, but IF I could easily buy a beautiful, correct-appearing reproduction gas tank for any car I was restoring, there is NO WAY I would mess around with tank sealers of any type or brand name. Even the outside of these new repro tanks are beautifully galvanized (like OEM units), and will likely last a very long time on a seldom-driven collector vehicle. (And think about this...if you are restoring a car of the 1950's through 70's...how do you properly restore the original factory finish on the outside of the tank? Have it hot-tank galvanized? What would that cost?) 

 

Again, to each his own. But these new reproduction gas tanks for cars of the 1950's through the 1970's are really, really nice. And WAY cheaper than restoring a rusty old one...especially if you must do so repeatedly. 🙂 Cheers! 

20151112_132323.jpg

Edited by lump (see edit history)
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Lump, who did you have fabricate your tank? I travel to the Wooster Ohio area regularly and have a tank for a 23 Moon that either needs repaired or redone. Stainless steel sounds like a great option to me. How pleased are you with how it came out?

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On 3/29/2019 at 4:44 PM, ryan95 said:

Lump, who did you have fabricate your tank? I travel to the Wooster Ohio area regularly and have a tank for a 23 Moon that either needs repaired or redone. Stainless steel sounds like a great option to me. How pleased are you with how it came out?

Ryan, 

I used to be a sheet metal worker in the building trades in the Dayton, Ohio area. I got out many years ago, and pursued an entirely different career field. But I still have friends in the sheet metal workers local. One of them plays on my pool team, and he overheard me griping about that rusty tank one night, and saying that, "back in the day," when I worked in a shop with all the tools and equipment, I could have made a new tank myself. He offered to do the job for me, and did an amazing job. (That's the SS tank he made in the photo in my post above). He installed baffles exactly like my factory tank, and welded in reinforcement patches where holes would be cut for fuel lines, filler neck, etc. 

 

The above photo shows the newly arrived tank before the filler neck, gas gauge fitting, and drain petcock boss had been installed. A famous old drag racer and close friend of mine in the area fabricated those components for me...all of stainless steel. Then I had it painted and installed it. 

 

My drag racing friend (Paul Frost), also spent time repairing the impossible-to-find gas gauge/fuel pickup unit for my tank. It was originally made of zinc diecast, and it broke when I tried to tighten threads on the fuel line fitting. He does amazing work. 

 

I am thrilled with the results. If you can't find anyone to assist you, I can put you in touch with Paul. He can get one made for you. 

 

NOTE: Keep in mind that my tank had only single radius bends...no compound radii. This made it much simpler for fabrication at an industrial sheet metal shop level. If your tank has compound curves, etc, that would add another layer of difficulty. 

 

Cheers! 

Fuel gauge repair 2016 Paul Frost 1.jpg

Fuel gauge repair 2016 Paul Frost 2.jpg

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