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I'm getting ready to pull the gas tank off of my '69 Impala SS,  just curious of the type of tank sealer that the membership has used with good results. I was told that it would be a good idea to have the tank "boil" at a radiator shop prior to sealing it....

 

Any suggestion / input is appreciated, first time doing this....

 

Thanks !

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I used the sealer that the Bill Hirsch Company sells. It's supposed to be ethanol gas proof. So far so good. 

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Posted (edited)

I normally use Bill Hirsch's tank sealer kits also, but for $289 the tank in  Xander's link seems like a real bargain.

Edited by Vila (see edit history)
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Gas Tank Renu. $350-400. Guaranteed for life. No tank too far gone for them to restore. I use them for all my personal cars and many customer cars. The exterior will have a coating, so if the tank is visible that can be a consideration because it won't look original. But if it's out of sight under the car, no problem. I've been very pleased with their work, and for what you'll pay for a radiator shop to clean yours out and to apply some coating yourself, it's worth letting the pros do it.

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11 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

I used the sealer that the Bill Hirsch Company sells. It's supposed to be ethanol gas proof. So far so good. 

I've been using the same in my customer's gas tanks and vacuum tanks  since about when it came out many years ago. Holds up to ethanol gas very well.

 

Paul 

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Gas Tank Renu. $350-400. Guaranteed for life

 

before I bought my car, this was done and there is a tag on the tank attesting to this. My tank is now rotting out. How do I go about getting it redone or repaired, or does that ONLY pertain to the original owner?

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 I have taken out two tanks that have been sealed on the inside.

 Both of them had soft and broken particles and one had plugged the fuel line up solid.

 I would never try to clean one up and seal it, better to buy a new one.

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

Gas Tank Renu. $350-400. Guaranteed for life

 

before I bought my car, this was done and there is a tag on the tank attesting to this. My tank is now rotting out. How do I go about getting it redone or repaired, or does that ONLY pertain to the original owner?

 

I would guess that a phone call to them would clear things up pretty quickly...

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Posted (edited)

Red-Kote is an internal fuel tank liner designed to seal leaks and prevent further rusting. As a sealant, Red-Kote excels at sealing the often hundreds of pin-hole leaks that occur along seams or where straps wrap around the tank. Once in place, Red-Kote forms a very tough, flexible membrane that will never crack or flake as many competitive products do. Red-Kote will not plug lines or cause engine damage when used properly. Future rust will be prevented because condensation will not contact the metal. A partial list of additives that Red-Kote is resistant to includes ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, toluene, methyl tertiary butyl ether, isopropyl alcohol and tetraethyl lead.   Red-Kote takes approximately eight hours to dry   One (1) Quart for up to a 12-14 gallon tank   For metal tanks only...   

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)
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Roger, the old type tank sealer will not stand up to the new ethanol fuels. From what I understand the new formula offered by Bill Hirsch is ethanol proof.

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Thanks for the input.... I'm leaning towards trying to keep the original tank on the car.... solid car overall, but I'll know more once the tank is removed...

 

Steve

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Posted (edited)

I have been fond of Renu, though usually only have them do the inside and at times the outside top of the tank (I finish the bottom and/or top of the tank in paint).  I generally have to call and ask who they want me to send the tank to achieve this result (ie you have to actually talk with people if you want different from the norm custom work done).   On a high point car, I recently had the tank dipped at a radiator shop, then dipped again at a galvanizer, hot dipped galvanized, and then sent to Renu to have the interior coated. 

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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By the way, there are some really nice reproduction tanks out there for certain cars - I always admire them in shops where I have work done/help me and unfortunately I tend to not be lucky enough to ever have a project that has these types of reproduction parts available. 

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I have used the Caswell epoxy system 5 times now.  The last tank I did sat for 16 years full of gas (ugly), the key is do a good job cleaning the tank out,  after draining I put in a few quarts of good

solvent and let it sit overnight, then a long cleaning with a pressure washer and strong detergent, flush it out till only clear water is coming out.  Blow dry (oil free) compressed air through it 

overnight at about 5 PSI.  Coat the tank per instructions, I have had excellent results, would never consider a single component system again (had a bad experience once). Its a bit expensive,

like $80 on EBAY, but well worth it.

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As someone who has had two different gas tanks sealed, I tend to agree with the folks who say replace the tank instead of getting the original sealed. Sixties era Impalas were, and still are, pretty popular cars, and I'd be surprised if there aren't oem style aftermarket tanks. Impalas are popular among restorers, too, so that increases the likelihood of availability. 

 

The only caveat would be station wagons, which sometimes have different shaped tanks, and since most wagons weren't popular to restore until recently, few replacements were available. That's the only reason I had my Ford wagon tank resealed instead of replaced. The downside to sealing is that the coating can come loose over time. I also worry because of additives I put in my gas and their effect on the coating. I put Marvel Mystery Oil in (on occasion) without much worry, but I no longer feel confident putting Sea Foam in my coated tanks, as it's a cleaner/solvent/whatever.  The good news is both of my tanks turned out basically okay, and after 15 years or so they're still functioning mostly good, but I did have a few small flakes of of dried sealant show up in one of my fuel filters a few years back. That's when I stopped using Sea Foam and no problems since.

 

Coating the tank wasn't something I wanted to try by myself since decent condition replacement tanks were near impossible to get at the time, so I had both tanks professionally done to avoid screw ups...and it wasn't cheap. If you can get a replacement tank, maybe it's worth the effort to go the inexpensive route and coat the existing tank yourself so you can at least get a new one if the project goes south.

 

They say the clear plastic fuel filters aren't safe to use in cars, but if you recoat your tank, you'll probably want to use one now and then (for a few months at a time) to see if any dirt, rust or dried sealant is still coming through from the tank. Using two is best - one before the mechnical fuel pump and one after. As I recall, the two different shops used the POR 15 tank specific product on the tanks. I've also applied the standard POR 15 myself over moderate to heavy interior surface rust (also 15 years ago) and it holds up real well.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, 46 woodie said:

Roger, the old type tank sealer will not stand up to the new ethanol fuels. From what I understand the new formula offered by Bill Hirsch is ethanol proof.

 

Yes, the gas tank sealers from before the days of alcohol in the fuel do not hold up, once they started adding ethanol. Such as the old Bill Hirsch yellow tank sealer. Ethanol turns it gummy and it starts to partially dissolve off the tank walls in gooey lumps. Then, it gets caught in and clogs fuel lines, filters, and carb jets.

 

The  Bill Hirsch alcohol resistant sealer (white) that's been around for over 20 years and it holds up very well. But like other sealers, it only works in a properly cleaned tank. Some don't clean their tank well enough and the sealer can come loose in spots. That's not the fault of the sealer if the directions on the can are not followed well enough.

 

Paul

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)

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I would never bother with an old tank if a new tank was available.If the terne plate is worn off and the steel rusting it is shot, buy a new tank it is better and cheaper and easier.

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6 hours ago, Mark Shaw said:

Red-Kote is an internal fuel tank liner designed to seal leaks and prevent further rusting. As a sealant, Red-Kote excels at sealing the often hundreds of pin-hole leaks that occur along seams or where straps wrap around the tank. Once in place, Red-Kote forms a very tough, flexible membrane that will never crack or flake as many competitive products do. Red-Kote will not plug lines or cause engine damage when used properly. Future rust will be prevented because condensation will not contact the metal. A partial list of additives that Red-Kote is resistant to includes ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, toluene, methyl tertiary butyl ether, isopropyl alcohol and tetraethyl lead.   Red-Kote takes approximately eight hours to dry   One (1) Quart for up to a 12-14 gallon tank   For metal tanks only...not for use on plastic or fiberglass tanks   I have been selling Red Kote for over 20 years in the radiator industry

We've been using the Red-Kote for many years in every car we restore/service with absolutely no problems.  It's the only gas tank sealer/liner I will use.

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19 hours ago, cahartley said:

POR-15 is the only sealer I will use.

 

For sealing gas tanks?

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10 hours ago, JACK M said:

 

For sealing gas tanks?

Yes.

 

POR_Testimonial.jpg

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Looks like the gas tank sealer is a different product than the POR-15 paint.

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On 3/23/2019 at 8:40 AM, mercer09 said:

Gas Tank Renu. $350-400. Guaranteed for life

 

before I bought my car, this was done and there is a tag on the tank attesting to this. My tank is now rotting out. How do I go about getting it redone or repaired, or does that ONLY pertain to the original owner?

Car & Light Truck tanks which are coated inside and outside with our patented process have a limited lifetime warranty — All other tanks are 1 – 2 year warranty.

 

Can't hurt to call as Matt suggests. 

 

charley

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