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I don’t know if this will apply in your case, but my shop has similar-looking ceiling insulation.  In the 40’ by 60’, there are seams and particularly around the seems, it seems to drop crud.  In my case, it’s a fairly fine white powder.  In photos of the collection in the Photos forum, MrEarl nearly had a panic attack thinking that perhaps sparrows were leaving calling cards on the 1954 Century.

 

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What was your total cost on project to date.  It's nice to give guys ideas of how much these projects cost for the guys thinking of building something.  I did a step by step on mine so guys could figure if they wanted to go a different route or finishes or even size. 

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 The total is not coming cheap, at about $75. thou. That's with electrical all done, etc., but no gas heat yet, The gravel had to be done, as it was just dirt and the floor level was much too high esp at the far end, which added about $4 thou.

 Could of saved some by doing work myself, but I'm slow at it, and I wanted it done so that I could use it.

 Keith

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Keith, this is a very nice building.  Earlier, you mentioned that you were putting in floor insulation, something like r18.  How was that done?  Was it styrofoam panels below the compacted gravel?  On one pic I thought I could see reinforcing iron and maybe a vapor barrier.

 

 You haven’t mentioned door openers but if you’re planning for them, allow me to put a plug in for the style that attaches to the wall and drives spring rod.  I have these and they work great.

 

So you end up just over $80 per square foot turn-key job.  That’s not bad at all and these days it seems everything has gone up in cost.  Again, it’s very nice!

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Buicknutty said:

 Could of saved some by doing work myself, but I'm slow at it, and I wanted it done so that I could use it.

It's nice when you can do it to get the job done.  It's easy to get buried and make painfully slow progress.  I have wished many times I could hire the guys back that put my shell up to do the siding,  but it's just not in the budget.  My business has required a bunch of capital lately so there hasn't been extra money for anything.  

I think I'm at around 110G on mine with another 70G atleast needed to finish it.  I have been trying to get each phase done as quick as possible as it seems like prices on everything go up monthly. 

Unfortunately spring clean up from a really rough winter has side tracked he garage project for now. 

Looks good.  You must be getting anxious to start using it now. 

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 Thanks, I certainly am! I am going to epoxy coat the floor before I park anything in there, but have to wait at least two more weeks till the concrete is cured. Might wait a bit more, don't want to rush things.

 

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 Thanks guys for the compliments.

 The floor insulation was done with sheets underneath, and it was solid foam panels with some kind of a reinforced reflective coating on the outside, and yes its' supposed to be about r18.

 There was steel reinforcing put in as well, and I saw the guys pulling it up, so that it just didn't sit on the bottom of the concrete.

 The door openers are basic chain fall type, which I might upgrade later on.

 As with most everyone else, its' a balance between cost and what you want/need, etc., etc. I could of made the building bigger, but just a few feet would meant an extra set of bracing, so going to 40 or 40+, would of cost quite a bit more, relatively speaking to the gain in floor space. Also, I was getting close to my property line, and didn't want to crowd it too much.

 Keith

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17 minutes ago, Buicknutty said:

Also, I was getting close to my property line, and didn't want to crowd it too much.

So you just buy another acre or so.  It's only money. ;) 

I had 10 G and that was a bargain in Unexpected excavating expenses as we had to fill alot more than I had planned.   Boy it didn't look like there was much slope to the place i was going to build until we shot it after getting all the trees cut down.  That was with me dropping all the trees and chipping all the brush as well as 20 yard loads of really nice sand clay fill for $100 each.   It all adds up so fast. 

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The rain gutter, er, I mean 'eve trough' you have along the front above the doors is definitely a good idea; otherwise rain will douse you every time you walk out the door and splash dirt up on the walls & doors from the driveway.  The other issue is snow -- did they install those little 'snow guards' on the roof to keep large sheets of snow & ice from sliding off and crashing down in front of the doors (and onto anything parked there)?

 

e.g.,https://snoblox-snojax.com/

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  • 3 months later...

 Well, here is the next stage in the new garage, a two post lift. A commercial grade Challenger 10,000 lb lift. This has a great deal of flexibility, the arms have three extensions to reach out to where ever you need to lift the car from, and several extensions for the lift pads, again depending on the vehicle I'm working on.

 This is likely more lift than I will ever need, and perhaps over-bought, but I wanted one that was as safe as possible, and that could accommodate the wide variety of vehicles we have here.

 Also, this is the new home of the '56 Roadmaster, and the Electra, due to the depth of the garage, these cars fit with lots of room to spare.

 Keith

 

 

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That looks great Keith!

 

Agree with you on the lift choice, better to be safe than sorry.

I won't be able to put that kind of lift in my garage as I won't have the height due to building code restrictions... 

I could do like you and move I suppose but will look at other lift options to work on the cars when the time comes.

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3 hours ago, dei said:

Agree with you on the lift choice, better to be safe than sorry.

Thanks, me too. I'm sure that they are all safe, but others I looked at had welding which looked like it had been done by amateurs.

Keith

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 Thanks guys, and yes, Matt, if you are here, you will see the new lift in the new garage. Being in the country, the height restrictions aren't as tight, even though we aren't classed as agricultural, I could still have it built with enough height for a lift to go in.

 Keith

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  • 2 months later...

 Well, here are a couple of pictures of the floor coating, this is a two part Rustoleum "expoxy", with the sprinkles to add an anti slip factor to it.

 I did one bay at a time, as the paint, once mixed has a limited pot life. Just like doing a car, the prep is what takes the time, and is the hardest part. In the past, a muriactic acid was recomended, but for this product it is a citric acid. Then lots and lots of rinsing, and a day to dry.

 With the floor fully cured, the cars are back in, and should soon have heat. I have a contractor coming to do a final plan for the amount of materials needed on Friday, for the installation of two small suspended units, natural gas fired heaters. The reason for two, is to back each other up, and so that only one can be used in moderately cool weather, like we have now, and run the two in very cold weather, esp if one or more of the bay doors have been opened to warm the space back up quickly.

 Keith

 

GarageFlr1.jpg

GarageFlr2.jpg

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On 10/30/2019 at 1:50 PM, Buicknutty said:

 Well, here are a couple of pictures of the floor coating, this is a two part Rustoleum "expoxy", with the sprinkles to add an anti slip factor to it.

 I did one bay at a time, as the paint, once mixed has a limited pot life. Just like doing a car, the prep is what takes the time, and is the hardest part. In the past, a muriactic acid was recomended, but for this product it is a citric acid. Then lots and lots of rinsing, and a day to dry.

 With the floor fully cured, the cars are back in, and should soon have heat. I have a contractor coming to do a final plan for the amount of materials needed on Friday, for the installation of two small suspended units, natural gas fired heaters. The reason for two, is to back each other up, and so that only one can be used in moderately cool weather, like we have now, and run the two in very cold weather, esp if one or more of the bay doors have been opened to warm the space back up quickly.

 Keith

 

GarageFlr1.jpg

GarageFlr2.jpg

 

 

Man that is NICE!!!!!! 

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