Buicknutty

New Garage for my Buicks

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How much snow do you usually get,  especially at one time or with back to back storms? 

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Interesting build Keith. It would be the metal version of a pole barn.

Is it going to be insulated too?

With a metal roof I might be concerned about sweating if not heated.

Dad built a pole barn and the builder recommended putting on a plywood roof with shingles just to avoid that issue as he didn't plan on insulating and heating it. He also put a bathroom fan / vent in to circulate the air some and he never had moisture issues.

 

Looking good so far Keith!

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 We can get quite a bit of snow, for this area, 2-3 feet.

 

 Doug, this is what is often called a pole barn, and it is insulated, r18 in the walls and roof, and I think something like r30 for the wall nearest the other garage, as it has to be a firewall.

 Also, the floor is have about r18 in it as well, then 6+ in of concrete.

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Curious what the snow load in the plans was figured on?  I think I specked mine for the next higher zone (overkill,  but I don't want to worry about it) It's either 85 or 90 lbs.  per square foot. 

 The funny thing with plans is As long as they are stamped the next guys all sign off,  because it falls on the guy with the stamp,  who may not even be in business when the building falls down.  I know steel supports differently than wood and the factors are figured in as a system where many of us figure stuff on the individual components.   My trussess are 2 foot on center 6 on 12 pitch with 2 x 6 top and bottom plates.   Of course I have a 60 foot clear span with 2 foot overhang. 

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I don't know that detail, but the company does employ an engineer, and these buildings have been around in the area for quite some years.

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As I said it's probably something to do with the perlin size as well that connects the trusses.  I imagine a steel truss might be stronger than a wood one,  as the wood ones of larger sizes have to be pieced along the top and bottom bands where the steel ones can be one piece.  I got a little soffit up on mine between yesterday and today but with the wife under the weather,  I have had alot of her duties shifted to me as well as caring for the kids, school etc.  Got on my lift today went up,  put one band board on the siding to finish it off (of course it had a bow to it). Got the first fastener in so the 16 foot board was hanging by that,  then out of nowhere the sky's opened up and got me drenched.   I worked through it to get it up.  Of course nothing like working under Niagara falls wit hteh eves running,  I called it quit and put the lift inside,  then it stopped and never rained again the rest of the evening. 

Figures.  There is a higher power working against me I think. 

 

Nice to see the quick progress on yours. 

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 Here's a couple of shots from yesterday. Since I took them another load of gravel was put in, and smoothed out more. Today being the holiday, no work was done, but the conrete is due to be poured on Monday.

Keith

 

GarageThurs1.jpg

GarageThurs2.jpg

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Nice looking garage.  What is the depression in front of the last bay door?

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Posted (edited)

Is your gravel out front going to be the same grade as your floor?  I would be worried about water running in under the doors during one of those heavy rains or worse yet,  heavy snows that slide off,  blocking your door then the rain comes down and runs down the snow then freezes the door shut.  I rented a storage unit like that once.  Hopefully your floor will be about 6 inches higher than your outside highest grade that is next to the building.   I know we had 6 inches of ice under the snow this year so any water that permiated the snow flowed on top of that. 

 

Nice choice on having some windows.  So many guys build stuff with no natural lighting which makes it a pit if you ever have to go out there and can't turn the lights on for some reason. 

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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20 hours ago, Larry Schramm said:

What is the depression in front of the last bay door?

 That spot was still awaiting the last load of gravel.

 Keith

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 I've been at a bit tardy in posting updates. They poured the floor about a week ago, and they seemed to do a good job. The floor was burnished during the drying phase to give it a nice smooth, flat finish.

 Here's a few of the pouring etc.

 Keith

 

GarageA1.jpg

GarageA2.jpg

GarageA3.jpg

GarageA4.jpg

GarageA5.jpg

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Ah a cement floor.  I can only dream.  Maybe some day.  Sure is nice to see a Garage get built in a few Months and 2 pages.  I've been on mine for 3 years including site prep and I'm still on the shell.  I think we are at page 7 or 8 on the thread as well.  bigger is always better until you have to write the checks for it.

looks good.  You'll be working on your Buicks in there before I even get my shell done. :( 

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That's some float they have there!  It looks like it has a small gas engine on it.  Does it vibrate?

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 Yes, those gadgets were gas powered. Then they used a big flat one, rather like a fan to smooth it out when it hard enough to walk on. They did a great job on it.

 Of course I have had virtually all of the work contracted out, through one main contractor. So its' more expensive, but it does get done quickly. Though sometimes contractors don't work quick, but this place got it done quickly.

 Got a few more pics to post later on.

 Thanks, guys.

 Keith

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 Here's how it is at this moment. There is a bit of regrading to do in the front, and inside you can seee that one wall is finished with steel panels, and the rest will be the same. You can also see. I hope, how nice the floor is.

I will epoxy coat the surface after the curing is finished, then the electrical gets done. But for now it is done, but I don't want to park any leaky Buicks (or anything else) inside till the floor is coated.

 Keith

 

GarageInt.jpg

Garage Int2.jpg

GarageOut.jpg

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I don’t know if this will apply in your case, but my shop has similar-looking ceiling insulation.  In the 40’ by 60’, there are seams and particularly around the seems, it seems to drop crud.  In my case, it’s a fairly fine white powder.  In photos of the collection in the Photos forum, MrEarl nearly had a panic attack thinking that perhaps sparrows were leaving calling cards on the 1954 Century.

 

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What was your total cost on project to date.  It's nice to give guys ideas of how much these projects cost for the guys thinking of building something.  I did a step by step on mine so guys could figure if they wanted to go a different route or finishes or even size. 

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 The total is not coming cheap, at about $75. thou. That's with electrical all done, etc., but no gas heat yet, The gravel had to be done, as it was just dirt and the floor level was much too high esp at the far end, which added about $4 thou.

 Could of saved some by doing work myself, but I'm slow at it, and I wanted it done so that I could use it.

 Keith

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Keith, this is a very nice building.  Earlier, you mentioned that you were putting in floor insulation, something like r18.  How was that done?  Was it styrofoam panels below the compacted gravel?  On one pic I thought I could see reinforcing iron and maybe a vapor barrier.

 

 You haven’t mentioned door openers but if you’re planning for them, allow me to put a plug in for the style that attaches to the wall and drives spring rod.  I have these and they work great.

 

So you end up just over $80 per square foot turn-key job.  That’s not bad at all and these days it seems everything has gone up in cost.  Again, it’s very nice!

 

 

 

 

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11 hours ago, Buicknutty said:

 Could of saved some by doing work myself, but I'm slow at it, and I wanted it done so that I could use it.

It's nice when you can do it to get the job done.  It's easy to get buried and make painfully slow progress.  I have wished many times I could hire the guys back that put my shell up to do the siding,  but it's just not in the budget.  My business has required a bunch of capital lately so there hasn't been extra money for anything.  

I think I'm at around 110G on mine with another 70G atleast needed to finish it.  I have been trying to get each phase done as quick as possible as it seems like prices on everything go up monthly. 

Unfortunately spring clean up from a really rough winter has side tracked he garage project for now. 

Looks good.  You must be getting anxious to start using it now. 

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 Thanks, I certainly am! I am going to epoxy coat the floor before I park anything in there, but have to wait at least two more weeks till the concrete is cured. Might wait a bit more, don't want to rush things.

 

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 Thanks guys for the compliments.

 The floor insulation was done with sheets underneath, and it was solid foam panels with some kind of a reinforced reflective coating on the outside, and yes its' supposed to be about r18.

 There was steel reinforcing put in as well, and I saw the guys pulling it up, so that it just didn't sit on the bottom of the concrete.

 The door openers are basic chain fall type, which I might upgrade later on.

 As with most everyone else, its' a balance between cost and what you want/need, etc., etc. I could of made the building bigger, but just a few feet would meant an extra set of bracing, so going to 40 or 40+, would of cost quite a bit more, relatively speaking to the gain in floor space. Also, I was getting close to my property line, and didn't want to crowd it too much.

 Keith

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17 minutes ago, Buicknutty said:

Also, I was getting close to my property line, and didn't want to crowd it too much.

So you just buy another acre or so.  It's only money. ;) 

I had 10 G and that was a bargain in Unexpected excavating expenses as we had to fill alot more than I had planned.   Boy it didn't look like there was much slope to the place i was going to build until we shot it after getting all the trees cut down.  That was with me dropping all the trees and chipping all the brush as well as 20 yard loads of really nice sand clay fill for $100 each.   It all adds up so fast. 

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The rain gutter, er, I mean 'eve trough' you have along the front above the doors is definitely a good idea; otherwise rain will douse you every time you walk out the door and splash dirt up on the walls & doors from the driveway.  The other issue is snow -- did they install those little 'snow guards' on the roof to keep large sheets of snow & ice from sliding off and crashing down in front of the doors (and onto anything parked there)?

 

e.g.,https://snoblox-snojax.com/

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