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Crippdaddy

Newbie looking to start a Project car

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Here is car I liked..

 

we sold a two door  1955 Studebaker president. It was set up to drag race..

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Wow you guys have found some nice candidates. Great help here for a newbie. The ‘53 Buick hit my button. 

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11 hours ago, keithb7 said:

For my first vintage car I paid about $6,500 US for my  ‘53 Chrysler. It was running and I drove it home. That’ll be two years ago this May. In two years I have done all my own work and spent about $3K in parts making it more reliable and safer.  Engine Valve grind. New tires & rims. Brake work. Rad & heater core pull & flush. Fuel pump. Drop fuel tank and flush. Full tune up. Seat belts. Wheel bearings. New exhaust.  Voltage regulator. New battery & cables.  Rebuild tube AM radio. Fix all the little stuff. Etc.  All the stuff that almost  any car needs after 25 years no matter how old it is.

 

The old Chrysler brings me great joy. The cruise time with family and friends is great. It’s a 10 footer car that I drive about 1500 miles per cruising season.  There is no way in h e l l I’d buy a rusted out car like the Chevy you posted above. There are so many options that look good and you can tinker away on as I have. 

 

My wife likes to cruise with me but has her own hobbies. I don’t have a lot invested in this car and it gives back to me, what put in. I’m happy. 

 

 

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Crippdaddy you should read this post over carefully about 10 times. This is the kind of car you should be looking for as far as condition and price. And this is what you have in store as far as upkeep goes, even on a good car, which is now 60 years old or older. These cars require more maintenance, lubrication, tuneups etc than new cars and then there is the many years of age a wear and tear to consider. You can spend several hours a week cleaning, polishing, and improving when you start with a good car. But, if you like the car, this can be an enjoyable and relaxing hobby with an immediate payoff. You can tune up the engine, or install new tires, and go out and enjoy the car right away. You do not have to work and work on an endless project for years before you get to drive it.

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Even better, your wife should read this thread over a couple times.  Lots of people here with lots of experience.  

 

Thats a couple hundred dollar parts car in most areas of the country.   

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20 hours ago, Crippdaddy said:

I told her I see 5 years and 40K min to restore 

 

Yep.

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Posted (edited)

He has not been back. 

 

That 53 Buick is a real bargain.  I wish I could snap that up.  

 

And that 57 Lincoln.  Wow.  You don't see those at the local cruise nights.  10,000 or best offer?  Wow.  

 

 

 

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Edited by Pomeroy41144 (see edit history)

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Out of that lot, the Olds looks like a real winner, with the Buick a close second. 

 

OP, why do you want to RESTORE a car when there are plenty of very good running, driving cars that will cost you less? If you never owned an old car before, restoration should be the last thing on your mind. Buy a running car and enjoy it first. Learn to live with an old car and to handle its needs. Fix up whatever needs fixing, gain some experience. If you still want to try restoring one after that, you'll be in a much better place. 

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Posted (edited)
31 minutes ago, Pomeroy41144 said:

"He has not been back. "

Too bad, he disappeared just as we were getting into the real good stuff. O well that was only 21 hours ago, he may come back. I kind of hope he does and tells us what he thinks.

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Edited by Rusty_OToole (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

I don't think Matt has disappeared. 21 hours actually is the second interval of about this duration. No one receiving this much personal wisdom would chuck it. Military personnel are very respectful of rank. We are the Generals and Admirals in this campaign. Matt is coming around. His immediate "Commanding Officer" is taking notice. By the way, Matt, one very significant factor is your present age ?

                                                                                            No General,    -   Captain Cadillac Carl  (Matt, you MAY out rank me -although "Captain" has different hierarchy depending on service)

Edited by C Carl
Clean up (see edit history)

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Funny thing, we all have learned so much. We all learned some hard lessons. It takes a good person to share our hard leasons with newbies. It takes a good, humble person to accept and heed warnings from those who have gone out of their way to guide the unknowing. 

 

I sure learned a ton about my big rolling Chrysler over the last 2 years. As eluded above, I was able to tweak it then enjoy it each cruising season. I have bigger jobs to tackle however if I can’t fit them in between Nov and March, I delay. I hate to put it down for extended periods during cruising season. 

 

Next winter? Pull engine and tranny. Reseal tranny. Also decide how far to go into a rear crank seal leak. As you know once engine is out...I got a couple worn guides. Maybe a hone and re-ring? Crank and bearings looked good when I pulled a con-rod cap off #1 last year. So a freshen up or a full blown rebuild with machining? Hmm. Much to ponder.  

 

This is reality owning a good running 66 year old car. 

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, keithb7 said:

Funny thing, we all have learned so much. We all learned some hard lessons. It takes a good person to share our hard leasons with newbies. It takes a good, humble person to accept and heed warnings from those who have gone out of their way to guide the unknowing. 

 

I sure learned a ton about my big rolling Chrysler over the last 2 years. As eluded above, I was able to tweak it then enjoy it each cruising season. I have bigger jobs to tackle however if I can’t fit them in between Nov and March, I delay. I hate to put it down for extended periods during cruising season. 

 

Next winter? Pull engine and tranny. Reseal tranny. Also decide how far to go into a rear crank seal leak. As you know once engine is out...I got a couple worn guides. Maybe a hone and re-ring? Crank and bearings looked good when I pulled a con-rod cap off #1 last year. So a freshen up or a full blown rebuild with machining? Hmm. Much to ponder.  

 

This is reality owning a good running 66 year old car. 

 

My advice? Let it leak. If it runs great, leave it alone. Oil and transmission fluid are still cheaper than rebuilds. Leaking is an old car's default state anyway. Once you have that engine and transmission out of there, the slope gets very slippery indeed...

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7 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

Too bad, he disappeared just as we were getting into the real good stuff. O well that was only 21 hours ago, he may come back. I kind of hope he does and tells us what he thinks.

 

I figure he will be back;  but newcomers must realize

that they have started a CONVERSATION.  No one

in person would begin a discussion and then let everyone

else finish it!  Mr. Daddy, people have spent a lot of time

in making recommendations.  Please let's hear from you.

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Keith,

Before you tear into that beautiful Chrysler, I hope you take it for a long hot run. With it's low miles I suspect stuck rings.

 

Thirty years ago it worked for my 1963 Studebaker. It was a low mileage car (63K) when I got it after my Dad's passing. It ran good around town. Then I made a decision to drive it to Las Vegas. As soon as we hit the road two things became apparent, first the radiator began to leak, second was that it began to use oil, at about one quart to 125 miles. We were on our way, and I didn't want to turn around, so we continued. I bought a twelve quart case of oil, when I discovered the car's insatiable thirst for oil.

 

The trip was really uneventful from a reliability standpoint. Just had to stop every two and a half, to three hours to top off, both water and oil. By the time we got to Vegas my oil supply was depleted, so I bought a case for the return trip. I failed to mention it was hot, over one hundred degrees through the desert. Went up my favorite route 395. At Lone Pine we stopped, had something to eat, and the obligatory fluid top off, but oil level was still up. Stopped again in another hundred fifty miles, still up. The upshot, the car used twelve quarts of oil for the fourteen hundred miles to LV,  but only one quart on the return trip. I'm just saying that it worked for me.

 

Bill

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Posted (edited)
On 3/13/2019 at 5:29 AM, Rusty_OToole said:

Crippdaddy I thought I would see what kind of cars might be available in your area so I took a look at San Antonio Cragslist. Here are a few possibilities, or at least, the kind of car I think you ought to be looking at.

 

1948 Dodge in nice shape if you can get over the Mod interior. If not there are always seat covers. I like old Dodges, they were a well made car better in many ways than Ford or Chev. This one looks like the best buy at $5500 of all the cars I found. Seller says 'top speed 55'. Possible red flag. This car should cruise easily at 50 - 60 and top out around 90. Either the seller is a very nervous driver or something is the matter, I would do a compression test and check oil pressure to assess engine condition. If the engine is tired it is not the end of the world, all parts are available and they are not difficult to rebuild. But if the engine is tired this should be reflected in the price.

 

https://sanantonio.craigslist.org/cto/d/schertz-1948-dodge-2dr-sedan/6819643316.html

 

1956 Olds 88 sedan, another Best Buy because the seller spent $30,000 restoring it and is willing to sell for $10,500. Which tends to confirm what everyone has been saying.

https://sanantonio.craigslist.org/cto/d/san-antonio-1956-oldsmobile-rocket-88/6806069934.html

 

1953 Buick Special, $9,500 nice looking car

https://sanantonio.craigslist.org/cto/d/san-antonio-1953-buick-special/6820393693.html

 

1951 Packard 200 for $6400 Someone has lavished a lot of love on this car, I'm not crazy about the eye popping colors but to each his own. The paint, chrome, upholstery, engine appear excellent. I feel drawn to this car because of condition and because I like Packards but you might want to consider something more mainstream for your first collector car.

https://sanantonio.craigslist.org/cto/d/san-antonio-1951-packard-200-deluxe/6826701342.html

 

These were chosen with somewhat arbitrary criteria of $10,000 or less and no newer than the fifties. These are the kinds of cars you should be looking at. The more expensive models may be better buys than the Fords and Chevs, and also better on the road with bigger engines, and can handle modern  hiway speeds better, at least cruise at 60 or 65 without straining.

 

Don't be in too big a hurry, if you watch the ads and make some offers you should be able to get a nice car at the right price within a month or 2. I like to look at the local ads in my area, but find I have to ration myself because I find an irresistible buy about once a month.

Good advice Rusty great cars within budget , better than unrealistic project , just  buy ,drive , enjoy now , no brainer 

Edited by Pilgrim65 (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

still here just working nights last night so long night, this is a lot of good info and i think i am going to pitch the idea od a driveable option that needs minor restoration, and goin to ask her to wait about 10 years so my son will be 13 and he can help pick it out and work on it and when he turns 16 it will be his

 

i am also in the progress in transistioning to civillian life and that i think needs to come 1st before a project car 

Edited by Crippdaddy (see edit history)
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glad you came back- thought we all scared you off............................!

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Hmm,

If you can consider 10 years then you don't have the disease.

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1 hour ago, Crippdaddy said:

...going to ask her to wait about 10 years so my son will be 13 and he can help pick it out and work on it and when he turns 16 it will be his.

 

There's certainly no guarantee that your son, now 3,

will be wholeheartedly interested in working on cars.

Everyone is different:  He might like hunting, or computers,

or playing the tuba.

 

If you and your wife have the desire now, consider acting

on it now, realistically.  That way, you can attend some events

and make memories for your family.

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Just a thought but my project car is very similar (DOHC-4/5 speed vs V6/automagic) to one of my daily drivers. Just being able to compare the two makes figuring things out much easier.

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let's face it folks, many people who have never bought a car think they are going to make a mint on a flip. Not much different then buying a house to flip, except the house can make you money and the car rarely does.

 

I have heard the OP's desire mentioned many times....... when people see the cost and work, they quickly realize it isnt for them. Let's face it, we all want a lottery ticket, but doesnt happen often.

 

Barret Jackson has destroyed this hobby much like Antiques Road Show ruined it for the antiques market.

 

everyone thinks they are holding the golden egg, till they find out they arent.

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Crippdaddy,

   Another thought, you should get a copy of Hemmings Motor News, after all the thought you have devoted to this, you should treat yourself to one. I don't know if anyone else here agrees, but if you can't find a car you like there...you probably can't find one anywhere. HMN (at hemmings.com) will send you a totally free trial issue. Comes out once a month. At least 1000 cars for sale per issue.

----Jeff

  

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