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SOLD: Authentic, 1915 Ford Model T Roadster


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SOLD!!!!!

 

This 1915 Model T Runabout (roadster) was purchased by the Smokey Mountain Car Museum in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee in 1963 and remained in their collection until 2016. After being sold by the museum, the car was mechanically refreshed with new, lined rear brake shoes, rebuilt coil box, rebuilt fuel system, new wiring and many other new parts. A desirable Ruckstell, two-speed rear end was also added.

 

This is an authentic 1915 runabout-not a back dated later model or an assembled car. This car retains most of its correct and original 1915 components.

 

The original engine (casting date 6-8-15 and engine number 832253) is stock. It starts easily and runs on magneto or battery.

 

The body has all of its original wood which is rock solid and tight. The seat frame retains the original body tag dated 6-15 and numbered 316015. The sheetmetal is in excellent condition throughout. The original firewall retains its original data plate with the number 762817. The upholstery and top were probably replaced in the 1930s or thereabouts. They are certainly worn but usable and clean. The car was likely painted while it was at the museum many years ago. The paint shows overall signs of age and wear but it presents well. The car has the look of a proper, old Model T Ford.

 

The chassis is in excellent condition retaining lots of original paint. There is no rust pitting or scale on any of the chassis parts. The original ribbed pedals show hardly any wear. The spark and throttle quadrant still has defined teeth. This is obviously a low mileage car that has been well cared for and properly stored throughout its life.

 

A great opportunity to purchase a correct, brass era Model T Ford for the reasonable price of  15,000.00 firm. It is located near Detroit, Michigan. I might consider a proper Model T speedster or perhaps a mostly original 1928-1931 Model A Ford as full or partial trade. 

 

Please email directly at : motoringicons@hotmail.com or call 734-730-4274 to schedule a viewing or for more information. I have over 100 detailed photos I can email. I hardly ever check PMs. Thanks.

 

 

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Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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The numbers on the block have not been shaved down or re-stamped. The paint was removed and the metal was wire brushed to make them more legible and so it would show up the photographs. I did that myself. 

 

Here is the 1973 title showing that the museum bought the car in 1963. Of course, it has the same engine number which is on this block. 

 

The faceplate on the coil box switch is a modern reproduction.  It was missing when I got the car. Yes, the original 1915 faceplate would be all brass, not black and brass. It does, however, have the original bakelite/hard rubber switch assembly underneath the reproduction plate.

 

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Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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Although there are a lot of "1915" Model Ts out there, very few of them are real. This roadster/runabout looks like  great original car. The price is extremely reasonable considering it is a legitimate HCCA eligible tour car. Great presentation showing all of the proper numbers, etc.

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Same people believe that the magneto was made to run the car without fuel by it’s cosmic energy field... more crazy people talking out their butts... 

 

It’s looking genuine to me, the drivers side is a 2-piece stamping with a seam running down the back edge of the fake door bead, that stamping went to one piece pretty early on, also the plate under the seat dates that body to June 1915 and the engine was cast in June of 1915 -don’t ever believe that Henry stored blocks to “season” the iron, I’ve seen motor numbers stamped as close as 4 days of the casting dates. At this point in time he was pounding out cars as fast as possible and not advertising them too aggressively as they were selling just as quickly.

 

It looks very much like the March 1915 Roadster (I think Ford called it a Runabout) I had for many years running around Maine which was sold in 2011 or 12. A great starter for the Horseless carriage tours!

 

Yes there are more brass Ts around than there should be, but this doesn’t look like one of those cars IMO, just more crazy talk. As for having shaved the numbers, there really isn’t enough meat there to take them off completely and if it were done, nobody is smart about restamping the very crooked numbers, they always try and make it look better... 

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Thanks for the nice comments. Like most of old tourist museums,  the Smoky Mountain Car Museum apparently sold postcards with their cars pictured. Here is a 1970s era postcard with this roadster in front of the museum. 

 

I would consider a full/partial trade for a good looking and proper Model T speedster or mostly original 1928-31 Model A.

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Yes, sure is lovable ! Wow, if I were still in the acquiring stage of life. I would have already bought it. I know almost nothing of "T"s, and have a question : what are the high/low ratios of the Ruxtell compared with standard ? What "safe" steady cruising speed could be maintained in high ?         Thanks,   -   Carl 

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Mark Wetherbee, Do you know how long that left side panel was made in two pieces? I knew about the manufacturing troubles that delayed introduction of the '15 style open cars, and that early ones used two pieces put together instead of a one piece stamping. I have never heard exactly how long that "fix" was used. I am always trying to learn more about these things. And part of my interest is that I am working on restoring one myself.

 

I totally agree that this car looks to be mostly an original real car, restored, and a really good deal for the money! I wish I could afford to buy it. It would be smarter than restoring the one I have. But for me, my "pile" will have to do. At least it is from an original early '15, however far from a complete car when a friend of mine got it. The body has the original date coded plate like the one shown above for the subject car. Mine is date coded February '15. And yes, my left side panel was also made in two pieces, seamed at the rear of the fake door lines.

 

This is a nice looking car! I hope it gets a good home. It would be nice if I can get mine on the same HCCA tour as this one some day. Mine will be the worse one.

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Wayne, I do not know the exact date of the change to the side, but I do know it was in the late 15 timeframe, which due to model years might be considered a 16 - well before the end of the brass radiator which is why I am certain this is the real deal. If you look at earlier cars it was a holdout from 14 with the forward section changed for the cowling.

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12 hours ago, C Carl said:

Yes, sure is lovable ! Wow, if I were still in the acquiring stage of life. I would have already bought it. I know almost nothing of "T"s, and have a question : what are the high/low ratios of the Ruxtell compared with standard ? What "safe" steady cruising speed could be maintained in high ?         Thanks,   -   Carl 

 Basically, the Ruckstell provides a useful and very practical intermediate gear between standard Ford low and standard Ford High. It basically gives you four speeds. It does nothing for the top end, since the high gear is standard Ford high, but it allows you to easily climb hills or drive in traffic without using low gear and wearing out the Ford low band. Ruckstells are essential if you are going to tour anywhere where there are mountains or long grades.

 

Here is a chart with the gear ratios with a Ruckstell:

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Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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7 hours ago, Doug Taylor said:

would you take 12000.00 for 1915 model t thanks Doug 413/325/7102

As the ad states, the price is firm.

If you are seriously interested in the car at the posted firm price of 15,000.00, please call me at 734-730-4274. Thank you.

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A really nice car and if it is not sold by Aug. 5 you could bring it to the AACA National Vintage tour in Kingston On. seeing you are not that far away. I have a 12 and a 15 T and the 15 original touring I bought in Detroit 2 years ago and paid more than that.  A 15 T is a great car for getting into vintage touring with the accessibility of parts very dependable  and exhalent value. 

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Thank you for the info, Guy. So then the Ruxtell is an underdrive. That being the case, would it be ideal for longer distance touring to change the standard 3.6 to the higher 3.0 gears ? And what is a good cruise speed with state-of-the-art synthetic lubricants ? I have never driven a "T", but have been told I really must while I an still able. No, seriously, if I could time machine back to the me of 20 years ago, I would be getting myself and this old Ford ready for a very slow back roads cross country drive to Washington state this Spring/Summer. There is absolutely nothing about cars I enjoy more than driving them. My second most favorite thing to do with cars is riding in them while someone else is at the wheel. I hope someone in AACA buys the car and keeps in touch with us here.  -   Carl 

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12 hours ago, Doug Taylor said:

would you take 12000.00 for 1915 model t thanks Doug 413/325/7102

 

Hi Doug ! Normally I would not write what I am about to, but you being a newbie, I feel compelled. I would like to heartily welcome you to AACA by sticking my nose into your binnich. See, I really don't know anything about you and your experience level, and you may possibly not know much more about us here in the friendly  universe of the forums. I know this is perhaps a misplaced assumption of familiarity : my advice to you is buy this roadster. Never let a small amount of money get in the way of a car you love, if in fact  it is love you feel. If you are just fishing to flip, you and I really have nothing to talk about. We have a highly regarded group of brokers like Guy here, Matt,  Andy, Tom, and others who are kind enough to present good deals on their cars to their fellow AACA members and forum friends. VERY straight shooters. Usually the hot desirable pieces such as this sell quickly, and these gentlemen certainly don't need my help selling at all. That is not what I do here. You can read all my posts by clicking on that little picture of my '24 Cadillac and following logic. You will realize I am not in any way an agent for anybody, nor have ever acted as a "shill" in any way.

 

No, I am doing this by way of extending hospitality to someone I hope will stay with us and share the antique automobile hobby through forum fellowship. Firm price is exactly that, and relieves the buyer of any speculation regarding what amount of money was left on the table. Please take my advice. If you are in love with this "T" roadster. Do yourself a favor and get it. Again, I don't know you at all, but if I had  made a close offer on a car I loved and " struck out looking", I would regret it forever. You always kick yourself for letting a great one get away. I will be sorry for the little time I have left that this car came too late in life for me.

 

There. I have discharged my obligation to you, not knowing whether it is welcome. Please forgive me if I am out of place. You may well be far more sophisticated than I. I am probably older than you. I certainly would not have taken so much time to butt in if you were not so new here. Again, sincerest welcome !                                                                                                                           Yes, if you scratch deeply enough, you will find that most, if not all of us, harbor some regret(s),      -   Carl 

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2 hours ago, C Carl said:

Thank you for the info, Guy. So then the Ruxtell is an underdrive. That being the case, would it be ideal for longer distance touring to change the standard 3.6 to the higher 3.0 gears ? And what is a good cruise speed with state-of-the-art synthetic lubricants ? I have never driven a "T", but have been told I really must while I an still able. No, seriously, if I could time machine back to the me of 20 years ago, I would be getting myself and this old Ford ready for a very slow back roads cross country drive to Washington state this Spring/Summer. There is absolutely nothing about cars I enjoy more than driving them. My second most favorite thing to do with cars is riding in them while someone else is at the wheel. I hope someone in AACA buys the car and keeps in touch with us here.  -   Carl 

 

Thanks for the nice comments, Carl.

 

A good running Model T with a stock engine should easily cruise at 40 mph. If I were to keep this car, I would install either 3.0 or 3.25 gearing (also available) in the rear end for higher cruising speed and to reduce engine speed. Higher gears would be a great addition to this light roadster. You can easily "massage" a Model T engine and significantly increase this speed. The 1912 touring in my avatar has high compression pistons, a modified cam and larger valves. With the stock rear end gearing,  it effortlessly cruises in the upper 40s and can go faster upon request. 

 

Millar Newman, the famed early car collector and father of today's famous pre-1916 Transcontinental Tours would always say the two most reliable cars for cross country driving are a Pre-1916 Rolls Royce Silver Ghost or a Model T Ford. At the end of his tours, the Ts and Ghosts always performed the best with the least amount of headaches.

 

The 1912 touring in my avatar has been driven about 80,000 miles during my ownership including a few transcontinental jaunts as well as leisurely climbs to the top of Pikes Peak and Mount Washington. 

 

There is nothing more fun that a properly sorted out Model T Ford. Nothing.

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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I was somewhat aware of performance equipment for "T"s. Thanking you for taking your time educating me, the following pictures. Taken at Murray Motorcar, Monroe, Washington, this last November. AL and Paul Murray grew up with Model Ts, as their father was heavily into them. Paul is in a couple of these pictures. He has his arms crossed in the last one.      -     Carl 

 

 

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I started in the hobby at age four and turned fifty three last week. I have owned and driven some of the best pre war cars in the world, and having never even gone for a ride in a T, until three years ago when I decided I wanted one. I purchased a very original 15 Touring, and enjoy it very much. It was unmolested and had only three non authentic 1915 parts on it. Was an interesting exercise to learn about them and hunt a good one down. This is a very nice car at a very reasonable price, I doubt anyone could do better on a roadster, no matter how long you look. Ed

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Well, in that case, please allow me to wish you a belated : HAPPY BIRTHDAY, ED !!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Now I think your last sentence really sums it up perfectly. I also have a recent, (late in life for me, 1/2 again as old as you), developing love for the "T"s. This one will always be in my "if only" file right next to that original, unrestored  '29 Pierce Arrow sedan you and John thoroughly sorted. 

 

I don't know if Doug is still on the fence. One timer ? Anyway, I seldom plug cars here, but when I fall in love, it is hard to imagine that others do not feel the same way.

 

Again, ED, I hope you had the happiest of all birthdays. I know you will enjoy the rest of the "cool" tropical driving season. I used to spend a couple of Winter months every year all over South Florida. Base rock for me there was the Martin County end of Hutchinson Island, near the Elliot Museum. I know you resist gluttony, so I won't recommend the best hamburger in the known universe if you find yourself just South of 'Lauderdale". I dunno, maybe for the "Double Nickel" birthday ? 

 

O.K. For every carnivore who reads this, the name of the place is "Le Tub". It is in Hollywood FL on  the intercoastal side of A1A. My advice is to play the menu like this : Do  NOT order any other fodder than the hamburger. Hold the cheese, it's all about the meat. I like to just put a slice of tomato on it, and just VERY light mustard. Seriously. Real light on the condiments, if at all. Oh, and the reason not to order any other edibles, is that these burgers are large. Since I found this place maybe 20 years or more ago, (and did make the "newbies" mistake of ordering fries), it has been "discovered". Oprah became a disciple, and I think the hamburgers have actually grown as has the clientele. Say you go in with a friend or two or more. You are as blown away as everyone else, (by the way, if you have ever had a better one than these, after eating one, please let me know - kinda like Frank Pepe 's pizza). So you eat up, you can't handle another one of 'em, but if you haven't thrown filler down the hatch, you all will be glad that you might just be able to stuff in another 1/4 (or whatever depending on how many co-munchers you are sitting with). Reminds me  : just about dinner time. Sandy is a great cook, and I think Ying-yang beef (or whatever it is called), is on her menu tonight.

                                                                                                  Doug, are you still with us friendly guys and gals here ?    -   CC 

Edited by C Carl
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