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Posted (edited)

The cylinders are now off the engine. I only broke off one stud from the coolant tubes (another had been broken by a previous restorer). The nuts holding in the jugs were plenty oily, and came off easily. I was having trouble accessing the rear nut. After trying various wrenches, I reached in and found it came off with my fingers! I guess the last guy couldn't get at it either. I'm taking them to the machine shop for a valve job. They were leaking oil, so it's also a good time to replace the gaskets. The pistons are the original cast iron type. I think the valve lifters have been re-made. The originals had pot metal. Note also that the lifter clamp nuts had no cotter pins. They do now.

 

Phil

 

 

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Posted (edited)

I picked up the jugs today from the engine shop (Fred's Engine Service in Coatesville, PA). He re-cut the valves, put in new exhaust valve seats and replaced all the  studs (2 needed thread inserts). He painted them gray, but I will do them in black, which I think was the original color. He said the iron pistons looked OK, so I guess I will keep them. Valve seats have some grease on them to retard rust.

 

Phil

 

 

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Here is the Stromberg KO-1. Looks pretty polished. I'm thinking the "O" refers to "Overland." 

 

Phil

 

 

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Looks great Phil.  If you tried that down here at my place you'd have yellow jugs in about 20 minutes.  The pollen here is pretty intense right now but I have a feeling it is just getting started!!!

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Posted (edited)

A couple odd revelations today. I drained the fuel tank and looked inside to find a loose rubbery film. I assume this was a previous attempt at tank sealing. I was also surprised to find that the tank (under the front seat) was held in place only by the fuel line and gravity! After disconnecting the copper line, the tank lifted right out. The inside of the tank looks rusty, but I see no holes or leaks. My plan is bring it to a local shop that does fuel tank restoration.

 

My next perplexity was the piston rings. I removed the upper pair of 3/16" rings to check the slot depth only to discover a 3/8"- wide ring underneath. I've never seen this before. Any comments? Also, the rings are only about .010" wider than the pistons, which seems odd.

 

Phil

 

 

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Edited by MochetVelo (see edit history)
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The "loose rubbery film" may be a pre-ethanol tank lining coming loose after being subjected to ethanol.  It happened to me with my previous Jeepster.

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A friend had the same problem he strapped his tank to an electric cement mixer, put a length of chain inside the tank and left the cement mixer running for an hour which cleaned out the old sealant.

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The rebuilt Bosch magneto arrived today from Mainely Magnetos. It had the coil rewound, new condenser, polished and repainted. Looks pretty. They also replaced the hardware store nuts with the correct brass nuts.

 

Phil

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Gas tank clean-out began yesterday. As per the photo above, the tank had been treated with an early sealant which was peeling off. I discovered the sealant dissolved readily in MEK solvent. After drying out the tank, I agitated a gallon of the solvent (a quart at-a-time) through the sealed tank, pouring out a liquid resembling cafe au lait. The MEK dries rapidly, so I was able to continue after lunch to vacuum out even more rust particles; perhaps 2 cups in all. The next step is the POR-15 fuel tank kit I purchased.

 

Photos show the sealer after I drained it from the tank and the MEK has dissolved. It's still rubbery in texture. You also see me agitating the tank. Others have used cement mixers or the like. I'm getting a full work-out, however! 

 

Phil

 

 

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The weekend was spent treating the fuel tank with POR-15 "Metal Prep" to ready it for the sealant. It's necessary for the tank to be "bone dry" before the sealer is applied, so I blew it out for several hours with a hot air gun. It sure looked dry, looking through the gas cap hole. However, baffles divide the tank into three sections, so I decided to de-solder the plug the previous restorer had placed on the tank. An old brass tag indicated the job had been done by a New Jersey radiator shop in 1963. I hesitated to do this when there was a possibility of explosion, but the clean-outs had eliminated all traces of gas. It turned out the repair tag covered another hole over the center "cell" of the tank. A look inside with a flashlight revealed it was still quite wet with the rinse water, and I was glad I hadn't applied the sealer.

 

Phil 

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Tag seems to say "04/07/63." However, on another hole was soldered a 1979 penny.

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