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I just acquired a 1915 Overland Model 83 touring. I don't see any Overlands covered in the Restoration Forum, so I thought I'd report on mine. My car is quite complete. The former owner's son, from whom I bought the car, tells me it was toured in the 1980's. It starts up nicely but, so far, I've only driven it in & out of the trailer (I picked it up last Saturday). It hasn't moved in 8 years, the grease cups are empty and the oil is old. I drained the crankcase yesterday. It holds a lot of oil. It nearly overflowed my 7-quart oil pan. The oil "filter" (a coarse brass mesh screen) was half clogged with fuzz. I'll next drop the pan and see what's inside. I've never owned a car this big (13 feet long) and it barely fits in my garage (photo was taken in the seller's garage). My other cars are all smaller roadsters. 

 

The Overland models from this period are similar mechanically: cone clutch, splash oil system with gear pump, 3-speed, rear-axle-mounted transmission, 33X4 tires (mine are 33X4.5). 

 

The paint on my car is old and will need some work. I may repaint it since the rear section has been stripped and some was sanded to bare metal. 

 

Phil

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The oil screen as I saw it; pretty well clogged up. I removed it and the oil pump parts dropped out, also.

 

Phil

 

 

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The carburetor is a Styromberg K0-1. It drips when the engine of off. I'm thinking it's the needle valve.

 

Phil

 

 

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Wow, I love it!!   Can't wait to hear more about it as you get it road worthy and take it about!  I bet it is glad it ended up in your care, should get fixed up in no time.

 

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The most obvious engine compartment problem on the Overland: a broken generator shaft. It broke right at the sprocket wheel. Someone tried a butt weld, but failed. A fellow Overland owner in the UK had the same problem. It seems the generator armature can seize causing the chain-driven sprocket wheel to snap off. Many cars have replaced the chain drive with a v-belt drive. He successfully arc welded his broken shaft by grinding the stub and the new end to mate like two dull screwdriver blades. The windings were protected with sheet metal, etc. to keep out the sparks. Also posted is a photo of his welding job. I don't have the welding skills for that, but maybe I can find someone to do the job.

 

Phil

 

 

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Here is a restored Model 83 engine photo from an Overland owner in the UK. You can see how the generator has been altered to belt drive. I'd like mine to look this pretty.

 

Phil

 

 

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On 3/4/2019 at 8:46 AM, MochetVelo said:

The carburetor is a Styromberg K0-1. It drips when the engine of off. I'm thinking it's the needle valve.

 

Phil

 

 

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You can generally "lap in" the needle and seat with fine polishing compound or chrome cleaner - I used toothpaste for the last one I did.   You may also have to play with the float level - could set  just a hair wrong that gasoline drips to overflow when car is stopped.  There is a shut off that I see on the fuel line by your carb (right. side) - you need to shut that off when you are not running as the needle and seat technology was just not all that good and if not closed will often drain out your vacuum tank (which will cause car to be hard to start - re-start).   No real need to send your carb off for a rebuild - it is all brass and generally a good cleaning is all one will need (as well as perhaps a specialized gasket or washer that you should be able to make or find without too much effort).   Also, generally speaking via early cars:  being updraft when you turn the car off you may loose quite a bit of gasoline that is in manifolds  - often surprising as much as a 1/3 of a cup.

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Focus on it mechanically - respray rear or have a good paint store match you some rattle cans of the color on car (and touch up rest) and then just have a good time (at least for a while).  A lot of people get too caught up in restoration and never even enjoy their car for a drive around the block. 

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This won't be a show car, as I plan to drive it. The carb and oil pan are off now. Here is a view from underneath. There was some goop and pieces of something in the thick bottom oil, so I'm glad I looked inside.

 

Phil

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The oil pan has a rope seal which the previous guy smeared with silicone. There were bits of silicone in the oil screen, also. The copper line comes from the oil pump and keeps the troughs full.

 

This car has gravity-fed fuel and no vacuum system. 

 

Phil

 

 

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Posted (edited)

The transmission lid removed, and the gears look pretty good. Only about 1" of oil, but all the gears are coated. What should the oil level be?

 

Phil

 

 

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Not sure what the Overland engine should look like, but the studs on the connecting rods look odd. What keeps them from loosening? I expected a bolt or maybe a nut on top. Also, the oil dippers look undamaged, but quite slim in profile.

 

Phil

 

 

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Look at the top of the studs to see if they have been hit, probably with a ball peen hammer. That was a cheesy way of spreading them slightly to make them tight in their threaded holes. Mitchell did it... they also cut a slot in the studs and spread them with a cold chisel.

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An Overland owner told me the same thing about the studs being peened, JV. I forgot to look today, but I'll check!

 

I pulled a rear wheel today, and the brake pads are quite oily. I'm thinking the differential was a bit over-filled (see photo) and/or the seals, if any, were not very effective. This car has inner and outer brake pads. At least the outer (contracting) pads were dry.

 

Phil

 

 

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Don't underestimate the original felt seals.  They have a poor reputation because they don't age well but it is unreasonable to expect them to work perfectly when 100 years old. They worked fine in the period and will continue to work well if replaced with new felts.

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I'm not sure what seals the rear axle have. The left wheel had a cut O-ring at the end of the axle that proved ineffective.

 

By the way, I checked the connecting rod studs, and they each have two punch marks, as JV suggested.

 

Phil

 

 

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Is that axle tapered and the hub goes on it? If so, it must be dry when you put the dry hub on it.

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Posted (edited)

Yes, the axle shaft is tapered. The oil from the differential flowed freely down the axle shaft, I think partially because it was over-filled. The brake linings were well lubricated. The transmission is attached to the differential, and, I believe, pumps oil into it. Some owners have machined these parts to accept modern seals.

 

Phil

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Here is a "mystery part" I discovered on the left front wheel of my Overland. It's a metal bar screwed to the inner hub. On the end is attached an odd, square machine screw whose square head is magnetic. I can't figure what it is. It;s obviously not original. Any ideas?

 

Phil

 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Here is another aftermarket addition: a temperature sensor on the upper coolant hose. It goes to a gauge added to the dash. I suppose this was a standard parts store item. Actually pretty clever, it apparently has never leaked.

 

Phil

 

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, MochetVelo said:

Here is a "mystery part" I discovered on the left front wheel of my Overland. It's a metal bar screwed to the inner hub. On the end is attached an odd, square machine screw whose square head is magnetic. I can't figure what it is. It;s obviously not original. Any ideas?

 

Phil

 

 

 

That might be somebody's attempt at adding a speedometer, in the same way the magnetic pick-up on a bicycle speedometer works.

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Could be, Walter! The car has an original speedometer, but I've not driven it fast enough to see if it works. 

 

Phil

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That mystery item likely supported the sensor for a bicycle speedo, or a rally meter. I've been guilty of fitting both to older cars, when accuracy was paramount.

Nice car, by the way.

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