MochetVelo

U-Joint Leather Dust Shields

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Posted (edited)

This is a photo of my 1915 Overland drive shaft. The universal joint has a leather cover on each side to keep out dust and seal in grease. As you can see, the leather is deteriorating. How can such a seal be made? I see these described as "leather dust shields" and "leather grease bags" in old Automobile Topics magazines.

 

Phil

 

 

IMG_1503.JPG

Edited by MochetVelo (see edit history)

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Have you checked with the Willys Overland Knight Registry? (WOKR)

 

They have a Forums group also and bet you would get an answer there from an owner of a car like yours.

Care to post a picture of your car?

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Yes, I posted on the WOKT Forum, but this one gets a bit more action. I see that Dodge used leather U-Joint covers from this post on the AACA Forum. The Overland covers seem to have more of a shape to them, however. 

 

Phil

 

 

P1000370 - Copy.JPG

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Join the WOKR the club has the blueprints for the boot. I sewed covers for my Overland

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Thanks. I sent in my application last week. I'll try to get a copy of those prints.

 

Phil

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You should expect that joint to be full of dirt with a hole in the cover like that. It will need a good clean and .....

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Your local Micheal's hobby & craft store has small leather pieces and the eyelets for building if needed .

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I had the same issue with my 1930 Plymouth.  Take the old seals off, measure the thickness of the leather and the size, use the original one as a template for shape.  Go to Tandy Leather online and order some leather that matches your size (you'll have to cut the right shape from the leather).  Mine was sewn, I think at the top and bottom to make a seam for strength, so I just copied the original exactly.  You'll need some heavy-duty thread, a heavy-duty needle to get thru the leather, and a heavy duty thimble or glove or something or you'll tear your fingers up.  Sew it exactly like the original.  Or, take it to a pro to have them sew it.

 

Mine was held on with a baling wire type material, then twist-tied on either end to keep it in place.  Fairly easy job, but any sewing needed make take a while as it's tough getting thru the leather in a quick manner.

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There may be enough for a pattern. I'll try removing it carefully.

I have a lot of leather pieces, as I repair player pianos and organs. Do you know what type of leather was used? 

 

Phil

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Our 28 Chrysler used some similar ones.  They had wires on both ends, and laced up the middle.  Jack Corly in Gresham OR had them in stock.  You might check with him.

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7 hours ago, MochetVelo said:

There may be enough for a pattern. I'll try removing it carefully.

I have a lot of leather pieces, as I repair player pianos and organs. Do you know what type of leather was used? 

 

Phil

Phil, I don't remember, but it is very similar to the thin part of a baseball glove in the palm area.  I can try to look into it further when I get some time away from work.  I should have the receipt somewhere.

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I made mine from deer skin is easy to work with and you can sew it on the wife's machine

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Deer skin? Easy to work with?! Wow.... I made some shift boots out of it and found it to be the toughest stuff to sew on a machine I ever encountered. It's too soft and stretchy. It's like trying to sew Jell-o.

 

It is unbelievably tough and probably a great choice from a durability standpoint. I would expect it to outlast cow leather.

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WOKR will be a huge asset.  The first employee my Dad ever hired was Dave Bell who was the Club President for many years - I recall their basement being packed with factory flat files of drawings.  And a large quantity of parts (and help) are available from the members.

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Hi Phil,

 

The leather looks like it has no outer surface. I wonder if they where using leather with the top grain removed and not surfaced. How is it jointed together sewn or laced? 

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If there like Detroit type universals, it is actually a dust cover .  To keep dirt out of joint . Most are found over greased . And it is a suede material as you described . Most where sewn and had laces of clips or eyelets for leather shoelaces . And ends had heavy tie wire in sewn seam to fix to groove on either end of joint .

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That's right Tom, Not and advert for these guys, but DCM of Michigan carries a reproduction...exactly as you describe. Only diff is no laces of clips.

IMG_5059.jpg

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This is the boot installation on my 31 Auburn.

driveshaft2.JPG

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