Fox Collections

1955 Chevy Nomad Bel Air

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

 

I'm looking to sell my 1955 Chevy Nomad Bel Air. This is a one owner car. I had her running about 4 years ago. She currently sits out side (covered) at the moment but was garage kept for 50 years. She definitely needs some TLC. I'm not sure how to open the hood but I believe there's a  327 corvette engine in there from the 60's. I was looking to see what the value might be and perhaps toying with the idea of bring her back to life. 

Any help in what she might be worth as is would be great. Of course I willing to let her go. Also have a look at the link below which offer about 25 additional pictures. Thanks in advance.

 

PS the care is located in NY.

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fi0pbYmBwwj474jQc8s1G6YKm0wlpAoo/view?usp=sharing

Screen Shot 2019-03-01 at 5.58.22 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-03-01 at 5.58.13 PM.png

Screen Shot 2019-03-01 at 5.58.08 PM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're the original owner?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is very cool to have that history!

Looks like a 1965 Corvette steering wheel in there too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My guess would be 10 to 12G as it sits as a real sale price that would actually move it.  I'm not sure if they make the front fender trim new or not but that can be pricey if missing as it's unique to Nomads.  I believe the front fenders are also unique though they look the same at  first glance.  Atleast yours look pretty good.  It appears the body is pretty solid ?no huge rust issues so that's a big bonus.  The quarter being banged up is a bit of a bummer.  Again unique to Nomads.  Missing Nomad specific pieces will drop the price a bit.  For comparison I would think a similar plain 2 door 55 wagon in the same shape would bring about half,  maybe even a tad less.  

For restoration a good front seat needing upholstery will run $500 and up. Fortunately I believe any 2 door front seat will interchange from any other Chevy and may interchange 1955  to 1957 but not earlier.  The side skirts for the seat might be unique to the Nomad. 

I've seen really nice ones,  but not perfect probably 3 + to 2 - for 40G.  

Good luck.  Neat car. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The latch for the hood should be right under the front center lip of the hood. See diagram. Unless it was removed & a latch that opens from inside the car was added. If & when you get it open, PM me through here and give me the numbers & codes from the engine (See 2nd diagram). I can decode them for you.

From the looks of the interior surfaces, the car was/is stored in a damp or wet location. The 2 non-chrome brackets on the front bumper look like maybe it had a towbar attached, which makes me wonder if it was towed places & then raced.

 

Image result for 1955 chevrolet hood latch

engine codes.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if floors and rockers are not rotted out- get it running and worth 18-20k

 

I will give you the 10k Randy is mentioning. I watch these monthly on ebay and these are hard to find at 20k.

 

I own a 57 in similar condition and had it sold more then once for 20k and backed out..............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey guys,

 

I can't thank you all enough for the information. I've been thinking about getting her back on the road for years now. 

1. Yes was towed but i'm not sure if raced. I have the original caps as well as the towing hatch (see pictures)

2. Thanks for the hood diagram, I will definitely try and pop her open was the weather gets a little nicer and supply you with the numbers.

3. I would be interested in selling it. Where are you located?  

 

Lastly, if I'm correct these are hard to come by/rare. I've seen them fully restored for 80-150k. I wouldn't mind getting her back up on the road. Year ago, my old man wanted me to take her to Chip Foose and have her redone.

 

Were you guys able to click on the link below? it has a good amount of pictures except for the engine.

 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1fi0pbYmBwwj474jQc8s1G6YKm0wlpAoo/view?usp=sharing

IMG_6598.JPG

IMG_6594.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NJ

 

rdz69@aol.com

 

upper end is 75k range

 

150k isnt reality.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes to make this car worth 75 you will spend 100G easy.  Many are for sale in the 50 ish range that are very nice.  I like 55 to 57 Nomads and especially the 55 so I take note of ones I see for sale.   There was a very nice one for sale that was a frame off about 2 years ago in my region (NY state like you). There were alot of detailed photos and it looked very nice.  It was 45G. 

Not down playing your car. They are cool,  just like many things project and finished value have alot of ground between them. 

Project prices are down because of the hard reality that restoration costs alot of money and many end up somewhere between disassembled to half done sitting in the corner of a body shop that never seems to finish them.  

A 75G Nomad has at minimum a 10G if not 20G paint job on it and that's starting with a very straight rust free body. 

See what parts you have for it that are currently not shown.  Can't hurt to take inventory so you will know what to keep your eyes open for.  The headlight eyebrows front fender and door trim are important.  Looks like all the bars are on the gate so that helps,  though it looks like the gate mechanism might be messed up for the upper part.  There are companies that rebuild them,  I saw listed in Hemmings. Front floors look intact,  maybe a patch on the rear but it does look like you have the rear seat.  Any other siginificant rust? 

You like it,  that's great get it up and going and make it roadworthy,  then drive it.  Even if you just scuff down the finish and prime it.   Hire a pro to fix the quarter though that is highly recommended.  You don't want to mess that up.   

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, the 55's are definitely the most sort after. I should have 4 extra rims, and the toying hitch. I'm not a total expert so I would have to dig around to see what's in storage. I wouldn't mine getting like you said, roadworthy and a scuff/prime. I'm just not sure who that would be in my area at a reasonable cost. I'm pretty sure my old man put a huge engine under neath but can't pop the hood yet. Maybe a few weeks or so. It should be 100% original except the steering wheel and engine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on the extent of the rust, but since it's lived in New York, my gut says it's a $5000 project car. The '55s are likely the most desirable of the Nomads but Tri-Five Chevy guys are a particular bunch. They want the one they want and won't often be swayed by one of the other two years, especially if it's a project. '57 guys are always going to want a '57, not a '55. That thins your market a little, and it's a market that's already slowing down in a very noticeable way. 10 years ago would have been the best time to sell it. Now you're fighting a diminishing customer base--I love Nomads myself, but at age 49, I don't much care to own one. I am not alone. All of the Tri-Five Chevys that come to me are from elderly guys getting out of the hobby. The guys who buy them are slightly less elderly guys. I have yet to sell a Tri-Five Chevy to a young person (meaning under 50) and I've sold quite a few.

 

 As Auburnseeker pointed out, it's a long way from being a functional car and the guy doing the work will spend more than it's worth to get there. Ideally, you will find the guy who will do it for love and not think about the economic impact, but you also have to recognize that he probably has shallower pockets and a high buy-in will keep him out of the market. Guys with money ALWAYS run the math first, then make a decision. Just because they can afford to burn it, doesn't mean they don't think about economic realities. Truly passionate hobbyists are often DIY with more limited resources, and therefore can't afford a big ticket item as a starting point. If you want to sell it and get it gone, price it aggressively and let the right guy have it who will save it.

 

I would also respectfully disagree with my friend Randy about getting it into primer--that's always a signal that something is hiding underneath and whomever is going to buy the car is going to take it apart and take it down to bare metal anyway. Let him see what he's got to work with--leave it as-is. Fresh primer is a red flag for buyers.

 

I've had this lovely 1955 Nomad for about five months. There's obviously a great deal of money invested in it even though it's not entirely stock. I'm starting to get a little interest in it now, but I bet I have to sell it for about $60,000 to get it gone (current asking price is $69,900). I guarantee it took more than $60,000 to make it look like this. 

 

001.thumb.JPG.4ef144adc6eb3654540e591a8dec6026.JPG

 

Put it out there with a reasonable price tag and get it gone. Holding out for top dollar will only waste time and ultimately money, cancelling out any bounce from a higher sale price. Would you rather have $5000 now or $8000 months from now after spending countless hours fluffing it, cataloging parts, talking to dozens of suitors, answering ridiculous phone calls and E-mails, dealing with hagglers and guys just looking for a bargain, and tracking down parts that you may or may not have? Cut it loose fast, take the money, don't exhaust yourself doing it.

 

That's my advice. It's offered for free, which is what it's worth.

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see a lever near the left side of the steering column.

My first thought was an electric trailer brake controller but I don't see signs of a rear hitch. However the pics didn't all load.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Could the lever be a brake lock especially if it saw track time? 

1 hour ago, Fox Collections said:

It should be 100% original except the steering wheel and engine.

The front seats aren't original.  It would have had the split back bench I mentioned. 

Fortunately much of the rest of the interior looks pretty original so they didn't' just throw everything away when they made it a drag car if that's what it was.  Is the quarter damage from a blown rear tire?  

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

I have yet to sell a Tri-Five Chevy to a young person (meaning under 50) and I've sold quite a few.

I wonder if part of that is just that the guys that like these don't have the disposable income to buy one until they are finally in their 50's?  Most tri fives in any shape except a sedan usually start at 30G.  I see more of the guys buying a tri five as being a family guy that wants an old car with 1000 other places that much money gets spent with old cars being the bottom of the list. 

I'm 45 have had just one sedan that was pretty nice.  Have looked at several including Nomads,  but just haven't had the money when the right ones come along and being a guy into everything from the early 60's to teens,  find myself with way too many distractions. 

 

Matt what are the demographics you see relating to Hot rods, originals , in each era of cars you sell?  Just curious how it all pans out from someone that sees it on a daily basis.  I've only sold a few old cars.  Maybe one every couple of years.  Seems the Buyers are mostly upper 40's and later for all types of cars i have had. Though I have had younger guys look but know they were just looking and couldn't afford the cars.  Usually as I had it sitting by my old shop when I was there.   I rarely left anything out when I wasn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Corvette shifter too. And when the hood was popped, there sat a 65 corvette 327/375HP with Rochester MFI. 😲

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me, there is something incredibly cool about a tri-5 Chevy (especially a Nomad) that doesn't have a $15,000 paint job. I guess it's the rarity of it.

 

Thanks for posting pictures of this beast. Incredibly cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
o

Yeah, the 55's are definitely the most sort after.

 

 

I totally disagree. I prefer the 56 the most, but think the 57 is way out front of a 55. I like the 56 for the rear tail light gas cap. the 55 is on the side and borish.............

 

as Matt said, to each his own. Also 57 produced the least.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually like the Pontiac Safari even more.  But overall just like the sport wagon styling GM was going after.  I always thought a 56 Olds 2 door sport wagon would be super cool.  I gave a passing thought to building one and doing it in a way that made it look like a restored car GM actually built,  not a resto mod or custom thing.  That would be pretty cool as GM never offered an olds wagon of any version in 1956. 

 

Unknown.jpeg

10079081-1956-pontiac-star-chief-std-c-1.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JamesR said:

To me, there is something incredibly cool about a tri-5 Chevy (especially a Nomad) that doesn't have a $15,000 paint job. I guess it's the rarity of it.

 

Thanks for posting pictures of this beast. Incredibly cool.

I didn't say it needed a 15G paint job,  but to be a 75G car it needs to have that kind of attention to detail throughout. 

I suggested running it in primer to save money as you will quickly dig a hole if you start restoring this car especially if you want to drive it anytime in the near future,  because once they come apart they don't usually go together real fast if ever by the one that starts the project.  Usually by a second third or even fourth owner.   I know I am guilty of it myself.  I've sold more than one project I started.  I also bought projects other guys were selling and got them back on the road.  Life happens even with the best of intentions.   Thus the reason my Cord sits in the corner all polished up but not running.  It's much better to atelast look at that way than in a million pieces scattered around the garage.  I know I have way too many distractions to get anywhere on it and other less needy cars to tend to.  Not to mention my big shop build which sucks the funds and life out of everything else. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, auburnseeker said:

I actually like the Pontiac Safari even more.  But overall just like the sport wagon styling GM was going after.  I always thought a 56 Olds 2 door sport wagon would be super cool.  I gave a passing thought to building one and doing it in a way that made it look like a restored car GM actually built,  not a resto mod or custom thing.  That would be pretty cool as GM never offered an olds wagon of any version in 1956. 

 

Unknown.jpeg

10079081-1956-pontiac-star-chief-std-c-1.jpg

 

I love "coulda' beens." Cars that the automakers could have built but didn't. I had an awesome 1970 Mustang Boss 302 convertible that was quite accurately done that was very cool and I would love to have a '66 Pontiac GTO wagon with a 4-speed and a hood tach. Things like that are just plain fun.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

55 NOMAD

    AFTER LOOKING AT THE 55 NOMAD THAT MATT HAS PICTURE OF, COMPARED TO THE RED ONE, WHAT PARTS DO YOU KNOW OF THAT ARE MISSING, AND WHAT BUY IT NOW CASH PRICE ARE YOU AFTER, THANKS BOB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now