Sign in to follow this  
JeffreyJ

Found crx

Recommended Posts

So I found this crx listed very recently.  It’s an 87 with 152 k. 5spd.  It’s listed this guy wanted to make it his daily but gave up as it has new wires plug distr. filters.  Says it turns over but he thinks a timing issue.  Why would someone give up. ? Hiding something.  So he wants 500 and I think that’s a steal for a straight manual 87.  I don’t think it will available for more than two more hours but I could be wrong.  I really don’t know the market value of these but I know they’re wanted.  (It’s a southern car) What do you think.  Any prompt advice would be awesome.

CDFC696E-C4D0-470C-95A9-221C6D0D7081.jpeg

0154EE71-81B6-4B64-9483-E4C7268D2654.jpeg

0354762E-03BB-44AB-B7F0-9D782AF5201B.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything can be fixed and $500 seems a pretty small amount of cash to gamble with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The interior looks very clean and tidy for a 30+ year old car, looking at that one photo, which indicates it was well taken care of for most of its life. 

 

I don't think you'll lose for $500.  FIRST order of business is replace the timing belt!!!!!   Once that task is done, THEN worry about the timing.  (It may have jumped a cog, and that is bad news if that belt breaks as they are an 'interference' engine.)

 

Craig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you sure the timing belt hasn't broken? I don't know if these are interference engines or not, but that could be the "timing" problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's worth $500 for parts if all else fails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can learn a lot about the maintenance of the car over that 150K by looking in the background of the picture.

 

If you can sell the parts, good. Otherwise take the $500 to a casino, changes are better.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Joe Padavano. If the timing belt is broken then you basically need a new head and/or engine. Believe this Honda is an "interference" engine, which means if the timing belt breaks then the valves hit the pistons. Damage is done to all.

 

Try to start the car. If it spins kind of fast, then the timing belt is broken. Run, don't walk, away.

 

You can find similar or better Toyota/Honda bargains if you keep looking. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IIRC most if not all Honda engines of this period are interference engines.

 

If the timing belt broke, it has a bunch of bent valves. Would I let this slow me down If I wanted it? No. Worst possible case maybe it knocked holes in the pistons and needs a complete overhaul. That said, I have NEVER seen a Honda knock holes in the pistons (I saw a Kia do it once). If it has bent valves you are likely in for a head rebuild & valve grind with a bunch of new valves. It isn't the end of the world. In fact, it is no more work than a head gasket, since the rest of the work will occur at the machine shop.

 

I would look over the rest of the car for serious problems (rust, etc). If it is solid, why not? $500 isn't a lot of money. Once you have it in your possession, start basic troubleshooting. Verify the cam shaft turns, check compression, check spark, and so on. Maybe it just has a bad Igniter or something.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 152K without changing the timing belt?  I wouldn't gamble, by purchasing the car and installing a new belt. What happens if you find out the motor is junk, do you really want to get into the parts business. I wouldn't want that car around while you wait for the phone to ring about a part someone need for their CRX. You might consider walking away as others have suggested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not be too afraid of it, even assuming the engine is shot. Today you can buy imported used engines for Japanese cars at very low prices, due to Japan's mandatory scrappage of older vehicles. When their cars reach a certain age (or perhaps even mileage?), they must be junked. So enterprising companies extract good-working engines and transmissions, and export them to the US. Many times when you buy an engine for these cars from a salvage yard, that engine did not come from a local car, but was ordered in by the salvage yard operators. If the car is otherwise sound, that engine might not be a deal killer, even if it is badly damaged. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For $500, nothing about this scares me. It looks solid. The interior looks decent. It's a stick shift. Whats not to like?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Car-part.com has a number of engines for less then $500.00

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My thoughts are; Worst case is an engine change. Easy peasy. You will have a decent looking car for around $1000 bucks and a little labor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just the picture of the poorly maintained yard and house with a rough looking car that they couldn not even brush the old leaves off isn't a good sign to me. If you took the picture at my place the cars are a shiny and well maintained even though the house looks like a dump. But both. Not good.

 

I sense you may be young. Figure out a way to get more money. It looks like you are "buying work". Spend the time you would, potentiality  put into that car working a part time job and come out way ahead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, 60FlatTop said:

Just the picture of the poorly maintained yard and house with a rough looking car that they couldn not even brush the old leaves off isn't a good sign to me. If you took the picture at my place the cars are a shiny and well maintained even though the house looks like a dump. But both. Not good.

 

I sense you may be young. Figure out a way to get more money. It looks like you are "buying work". Spend the time you would, potentiality  put into that car working a part time job and come out way ahead.

 

If the car was better maintained, it would be a lot more than $500. 

 

I will be the first to admit that buying a car like this will ALWAYS cost more in the long run. Having said that, it's never stopped me from getting projects like this.

 

The higher cost of doing it "piecemeal" is effectively the "interest" you would pay on a car loan - you're spreading the payments out over time. The other thing to keep in mind is that fixing this one is an invaluable learning experience that you won't get buying a car that's all done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's worth the $500 gamble.  The timing belt needs to be changed about every 60,00 miles.  Honda engines are very reliable and last a long time with proper maintenance.  I drive a '95 Accord that my wife bought new with 250k and the engine has never been rebuilt.  It runs good and never needs oil added between changes.  I have changed the timing belt and water pump every 60k. That CRX would make fun driver!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So did you pick up the CRX?
I think it's worth it if you wanted something to do some work on.

If nothing else, as others have said, it's worth the $500 in parts.

Out here in Calif there are a ton of younger car folks that would buy anything and everything off that car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personal opinion but having had two, I will never buy another car with a timing belt. BTW can have just as bad an experience with one of the early 70s GM cars (Chevrolet, Pontiac, dunno about Olds) that had a phenolic timing chain gear.

 

ps I still have a belt for a Twin Double Over Head Cam V6

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would rarely take my own advice, but sometimes it is really good for others.

 

I have about $9,000 in my $500 Park Ave convertible. I figure another $2,000 to $3,000 will have it at the level I want. And it does even have a timing belt.

 

$500: entry fee -

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, 60FlatTop said:

I would rarely take my own advice, but sometimes it is really good for others.

 

I have about $9,000 in my $500 Park Ave convertible. I figure another $2,000 to $3,000 will have it at the level I want. And it does even have a timing belt.

 

$500: entry fee -

 

Some of the most expensive cars I've owned are the ones I got for free... 😉

 

By the way, I assume you meant to write that your Park Ave "...DOESN'T even have a timing belt".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all the help and advice.  This is a really good site.  The crx would have been a fun little project as you don’t see too many straight ones around.  I found it an hour after posting.  I then posted my thread.  Then one hour after that it was sold.  I learned a lot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not surprising that the car was gone so quickly.

That era Honda cars go quick, especially if they look halfway decent, no matter what condition the motor is in.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, Jeffery'. I have been following this from the get go. Sorry you missed it. But thank you very much in any case for letting us know the outcome. I hope you continue to hang out with us. You immediately got the attention of some of the most knowledgeable experts in the hobby. Do you/have you had any other old cars ? I particularly like cars in the "Roaring '20s". But I have had fun old cars from '30s -'70s. Fast stuff too, Race prepared Jaguar XK120 MC, Maserati 3500, and now an almost "antique" V12 Mercedes-Benz SL600. But I am too old to drive fast anymore. Welcome !     -   Carl 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear that you missed out on it, but as others have stated, they are in demand, and with a good body and interior, that price was irresistible.

 

Craig

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It would be interesting to know your age.  In my 20's and early 30's I too would have hesitated to take a flier and lose $500.  Today that is the cost of taking your triplet grandsons and their parents out for a nice dinner with wine. Other questions you ask yourself are do I have the knowledge, tools, space, or money to tackle this project.  Collecting antique art glass for years I soon learned "If you snooze, you lose".  Because of this blog I am sure you gained a lot of knowledge that will be useful in the future and now know how to access the wealth of information that is at your fingertips.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this