GregLaR

Would You Be Disappointed?

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In our experience virtually all museums will have you sign paperwork before accepting your donation that spells out what they can and cannot do with your vehicle. A museum would be making a mistake if it took your car and agreed to display it in perpetuity.

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2 hours ago, padgett said:

they have a gaggle of Chrysler-Maser TCs.

 

A fun car but alas, not worth much.

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When you give (donate) something you are doing just that, GIVING it away. It's not yours any more. If you have any kind of sentimental or financial attachment to the item best keep it........Bob

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Interesting topic.

 

My wife has spent her career in the museum business as a curator at a well-known museum. It is very common for people to misunderstand loans to museums vs. donations to museums. A lot of people think of a museum as being the "forever" home of whatever they are donating...to be maintained and displayed literally forever and then get upset when they learn that is not the case. A good museum will make sure the donor understands that up front:

 

When an object is donated, be it a car or a fountain pen, it's donated - as in you gave it away and relinquished ownership. I'm sure someone can cite an exception, but generally speaking a museum will not accept a donation that comes in with a bunch of strings attached or donor stipulations. If you still want control over "your" object, it's best not to donate it at all and museums often have to tell potential donors that. Loans for a specified display period work better for those people that want to retain control of their objects and where they end up.  

 

Don't confuse a museum for a caretaker in perpetuity, either. That's not something that they can promise, and if they do, donors should be wary. Objects do get sold and traded off on occasion. Museums do go out of business or hit financial hard times that require liquidating assets which can mean selling what you've donated. They are not vaults with unlimited resources to care for your donated things forever.  

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If you own something and want to ensure it will have a chance of being held in high regard into perpetuity the best thing you can do is sell it at the very highest price you can. Make sure the next owner really wants it. I have been forced to do that at times but only for the sake of the item. If I suffer extra money I try to put it into a hobby car or tools (Maybe skim off a little to take my Wife out to dinner).

 

Over the years I have made charitable donations of things not so dear to me. Each time I get the feeling that the recipient expected more, enough times to make me a little less generous

Bernie

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Posted (edited)

Seems like I remember reading somewhere that Breedlove had loaned one of his land speed record holders to some museum.

The museum wanted to move it into some space that it couldn't be wrangled into so they cut it in half and welded it back together.

Then the family wanted to campaign it again but the car was worthless after the incident.

I think I remember a HUGE lawsuit over that.

Edited by JACK M (see edit history)

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In 1994 I loaned a large Art Glass Collection to a Museum associated with Texas A&M.  A couple of years ago they hired a new director and there focus changed  so I was able to reclaim my collection.  So glad we resisted the pressure to donate it.  Museums are like your kids, if you give them something of value it will probably disappear over time.

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Having worked in a museum and seen the way artifacts are sometimes treated I will never donate anything to one. Shocking how the "professionals" can treat irreplaceable items.

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On 3/6/2019 at 2:49 PM, Scooter Guy said:

Interesting topic.

 

My wife has spent her career in the museum business as a curator at a well-known museum. It is very common for people to misunderstand loans to museums vs. donations to museums. A lot of people think of a museum as being the "forever" home of whatever they are donating...to be maintained and displayed literally forever and then get upset when they learn that is not the case. A good museum will make sure the donor understands that up front:

 

When an object is donated, be it a car or a fountain pen, it's donated - as in you gave it away and relinquished ownership. I'm sure someone can cite an exception, but generally speaking a museum will not accept a donation that comes in with a bunch of strings attached or donor stipulations. If you still want control over "your" object, it's best not to donate it at all and museums often have to tell potential donors that. Loans for a specified display period work better for those people that want to retain control of their objects and where they end up.  

 

Don't confuse a museum for a caretaker in perpetuity, either. That's not something that they can promise, and if they do, donors should be wary. Objects do get sold and traded off on occasion. Museums do go out of business or hit financial hard times that require liquidating assets which can mean selling what you've donated. They are not vaults with unlimited resources to care for your donated things forever.  

 

I have a friend who is the Curator of a fast growing nonprofit museum that has a foreseeable future because it has a mission statement to remain relevant and dynamic.

 

He is passionate about what he does and it shows in his work.

 

Any museum is a business and requires money to pay the bills.

 

If I visit a museum and find value - I purchase at least an annual membership.

 

For some museums I provide free or reduced rate transport service.

 

If you find value in a museum - find a way to support it in a manner you can afford.

 

Jim

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4 hours ago, JACK M said:

Seems like I remember reading somewhere that Breedlove had loaned one of his land speed record holders to some museum.

The museum wanted to move it into some space that it couldn't be wrangled into so they cut it in half and welded it back together.

Then the family wanted to campaign it again but the car was worthless after the incident.

I think I remember a HUGE lawsuit over that.

 

https://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-breedlove-jet-car-museum-lawsuit-0124-biz-20170120-story.html

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Posted (edited)

I read the link.

 

Questions I have .....

 

WTH are you doing lettting something that you  ( supposedly )

care about sit in a Museum for (50) years - especially if you never

( apparently ) never bothered to check the condition of it from time to time.

 

The article mentioned a shop estimate for repairs but nowhere 

was it stated that any repairs were ever done.

 

(50) years doing without means you have lost interest.

 

Sounds like a Dash for Cash.

 

I would not have given that guy a Dime .....

 

 

Jm

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)

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I met Breedlove a couple of years ago at a friend's home. Later he dropped in to to my bar/restaurant.

I have to tell you he is one of the nicest guys you'd ever want to meet. Very down to earth and unassuming. No ego and a super positive attitude.

He shared info and a scale model of the new vehicle with me.

 

breedlove.jpg

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One year or fifty years, the museum should have had respect for something this iconic whether they owned it or not.

I have a few things around here that I have had over fifty years and even they have no monetary value and some might consider worthless I still cherish.

Museums, of all entities should know to respect the value of the history of things.

That's cool the you met the man Greg.

I am guessing the photo is at the bar. I want to see it next time I am down there.

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Yes it is Jack.

And autographed by the man. He's been a true American icon for just about my whole life.

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Little Deuce Coupe kind of overshadowed The Spirit of America song in 1963.

 

And almost no one caught this. Ahhhhh, 1963.

image.thumb.png.6ac61c2aedc32ff76718b854be42821e.png

 

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1 hour ago, 60FlatTop said:

Little Deuce Coupe kind of overshadowed The Spirit of America song in 1963.

I love that song but you never hear it.  I grew up years after the beach boys debuted and wore out their endless summer album I got at a garage sale for .25.  

I bought a compilation CD in the early 90's of Beach boy songs and hot rod hits and it was on there.  First time I heard it.  Wow blew me away. So smooth and a great American story.   It's now one of my favorites by them. 

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