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Wisdom of trading 1957 chevy belair two dr. hardtop for a 1957 Thunderbird


dr. james
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Members:

I'm sure that many members have heard the story of the school teacher who owned a low mileage car that she only drove to and from school and  then parked her car in the garage overnight.  Well I'm married to that 4th grade teacher who owns a 2006 Acura TL with 53k miles. She bought the car new from the Acura dealership 13 years ago. I actually looks as good today as it did when she took delivery.   She drives the car 4k per year.

I just returned from the Acura  dealer after having her car serviced with an oil change and filter.  While in the waiting room, a service tech came to me and said the car is ready but despite the low miles and  excellent overall condition, the car needs new spark plugs $429.95, valve adjustment $499.95, and a new PVC valve $124.95 and some fluid changes that quickly added up to $2000.   Incidentally, the car has a new timing belt, water pump, new hoses, belts, fresh antifreeze and 4 new Michelin tires.   I immediately got the impression the service tech was hoping I would say I would trade-in the car after learning about recommenced repairs.   On the way home, I stopped at my local garage to ask the independent mechanic if those repairs  were needed and if the estimate seemed accurate.  He just shook his head and said the car doesn't need those repairs at this time and when I decide to have the work done, he could  perform the repairs for a fraction of the dealer estimate.  Who is correct?

 

Thanks, Dr. James

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Your other thread went into this topic in detail.

If you have trust in the honesty and capability

of your independent mechanic, I say he is the

one to believe.  After all, he is TURNING AWAY

work by telling you that those things are unnecessary!

 

Now, what about the 1957 cars?

 

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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the 2nd mechanic is correct. your car should really need nothing if it is seemingly running fine.

 

Had the same happen with a friends mothers Honda crv- very low miles and needed nothing. they were sold a bill of goods for a few thousand. I guess I am not as smart as I look.............lol!

 

People often hear what they want to hear.

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27 minutes ago, dr. james said:

Members:

I'm sure that many members have heard the story of the school teacher who owned a low mileage car that she only drove to and from school and  then parked her car in the garage overnight.  Well I'm married to that 4th grade teacher who owns a 2006 Acura TL with 53k miles. She bought the car new from the Acura dealership 13 years ago. I actually looks as good today as it did when she took delivery.   She drives the car 4k per year.

I just returned from the Acura  dealer after having her car serviced with an oil change and filter.  While in the waiting room, a service tech came to me and said the car is ready but despite the low miles and  excellent overall condition, the car needs new spark plugs $429.95, valve adjustment $499.95, and a new PVC valve $124.95 and some fluid changes that quickly added up to $2000.   Incidentally, the car has a new timing belt, water pump, new hoses, belts, fresh antifreeze and 4 new Michelin tires.   I immediately got the impression the service tech was hoping I would say I would trade-in the car after learning about recommenced repairs.   On the way home, I stopped at my local garage to ask the independent mechanic if those repairs  were needed and if the estimate seemed accurate.  He just shook his head and said the car doesn't need those repairs at this time and when I decide to have the work done, he could  perform the repairs for a fraction of the dealer estimate.  Who is correct?

 

Thanks, Dr. James

What has this post have to do with this?

Wisdom of trading 1957 chevy belair two dr. hardtop for a 1957 Thunderbird

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Go by the book. I mean the owner's manual that came with the car, it should be in the glove compartment and it should have several pages showing the recommended service schedule. Go by that and you won't go wrong.

 

My impression is that the dealer is trying to rip you off. For example, $429.95 for 6 spark plugs is $71.65 apiece for spark plugs you can buy anywhere for from $5 to $40. If they are the real expensive kind they should not require replacement after only 50,000 miles. Check your owner's manual.  Maybe I shouldn't speak too soon, some plugs today are very hard to get at and require a couple of hours to change.

 

You are usually better off going to an independent mechanic than the dealer IF your mechanic knows what he is doing and is honest. I'm not saying dealers don't or aren't but they do have a lot of overhead and charge high prices.

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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

Since James is quite new to the forum, I think

that he managed to copy the text of his original

thread into this new topic.  Let's wait for him to

correct his error and tell us more about the 1957 cars.

John, you are correct I'm new to this forum and I don't know how the old post got repeated.  I will send my new question about the 1957 cars later today.  

 

Sorry

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Title topic: I would trade a '57 Chevy for an equal condition '57 Bird any day of the week. The caveat is that I've never actually driven (or even sat in) a first generation Thunderbird...but that's beside the point. 😄  If you're extra tall you may want to sit in one to see how much leg room they have.

 

Text topic: I just took my wife's 2002 Subaru wagon into the dealer and the bill will be $4800 to do all the brakes, fix the steering and disassemble the engine to replace the head gaskets and all of the engine seals and put a new timing belt/chain in. I remember when that money would buy a new car. In fact...two new cars (my brother bought a brand new '74 Ford bare bones Maverick 6 cylinder for $2400.) But my wife wants to get her car fixed and it's her money and it has 103k on it ,so, oh well.

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)
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I just replied to your other post and scrolled down to this one. I see the DR. tag. Once you clear up your mechanic issues, the real estate agents will be right behind. There are "target" professions.

 

At the service counter, most dealerships pay the service manager a base pay with a monthly bonus. The bonus is calculated from the original service request plus added service. It is called The Bump. No bump, no bonus. The general manager tracks all this on, what he hopes, is an ascending chart. He works for a bonus as well. If the chart doesn't go in the bonus direction the food chain is shaken with great force in the direction of the customer.

 

I have a nephew who changed careers over a conflict of interest on a car that meets your description. The service manager told him he had better go back out there and find some bumps. It is common.

Bernie

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