fryguy

Jewett Chassis

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Not sure if anybody here can shed some more information on the late model Jewett's?   I just picked up either a 1926 1927 Jewett 110" WB Chassis that was being used by an old PA farmer as a Hay wagon.  The wood wheels are gone but have mid thirties Chevy Artillery wheels bolted to the hubs.  Three of the hubs have the unique brake setup on them.  Stock rear and front axle and suspension.  Hubs still have the "J" grease caps on them.  Some angle iron welded to the front spring mounts for a makeshift hitch.  I can post some pics later this week.   Wanted to see if there was a way to ID the year of the chassis off any of the chassis parts or setup.   Were there numbers stamped on the frame anywhere?

 

 

Fryguy

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I saw your post on another thread also. Are you wanting to sell this? Thinking of restoring this?

In my opinion, the Paige and Jewett line are deserving of much more recognition than they get in the hobby. But I am prejudiced, I have a '27 Paige 6-45 in the garage. I can tell you that if it is indeed a Jewett, it is not a '27 for any practical purposes. Although the 6-45 was originally intended to be the Jewett for 1927, by the time they got production going, they decided to rebadge them as Paiges. Earlier '27 model year production may have some parts labeled "Jewett", however, they were generally sold as a Paige.

With the exception of Grimy on this forum, most Paige and Jewett owners are not very active with their cars. Mine was owned by my father, and never restored. If I live long enough, I would like to restore it, but that is looking less and less likely with each passing year. There have been a few websites devoted to Paige and/or Jewett automobiles (including a sub-forum on this forum).

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I believe the frame ID is the same in Graham-Paige as the Paige/Jewett?  Under the radiator on the cross member.  Start with light sand paper removing the rust, hopefully the number will still be legible.

 

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Nice looking car... should be a 1922? Jewett 50?  Not sure on the VIN number, guessing he has the body number, he is listing (D61829)

 

image.png.ec2a9720724b21bdc767ec14730db09b.png

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I haven't bothered to try to look up the numbers for that car.  But it looks like a '24 or '25 to me. I could be wrong about that. I haven't spent more than a couple minutes looking at the eBad listing. Anyone asking that ridiculous a price is wasting my time.

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So 1925 Jewett 50. 

 

Sort of too bad, $3500-$4500 would make a nice starter car.  Extremely close to my 1928 Graham-Paige  610, great car, smooth running, easy to take care of, not a big investment.

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I was pretty sure it was a '25,  just from memory and the pictures. I know what the '26s look like, and knew it wasn't that. The earlier models ('21 to '23) all had a much earlier look to them, with shallow headlamp buckets, plain looking radiator shells (they did offer nickel shells, but most had the black common in the early '20s), and earlier style fenders. 

I think if that Jewett could be had for less than $5000 it would be a wonderful car to play with and drive on nickel tours. I am about as broke as can be at this point. If I could get it for that $5000 I would sure want to try!

 

I get curious when people try to sell cars for absolutely ridiculously way over the top stratospheric prices! However, I learned a long time ago that most of those people are dumber than a stump, and pointless to speak to at all.

There are exceptions to that rule. A certain fellow that often posts very rare and desirable early pieces of cars on eBad is one such exception. Turns out I know another hobbyist that lives in the same out-of-the-way corner of this country, that happens to know the eBad fellow personally. (I am not going to reveal who it is!) The fellow has been a long time collector of rare pieces, he has made a hobby of preserving these rare and desireable pieces for future hobbyists to restore and preserve further. The high prices he posts are usually about two to three times the realistic value. He posts those high prices to weed out the curious and maintain his control over any negotiations. IF (that big "IF" I like to use) someone that is genuinely interested in something he has, and talks resonably to him, shows genuine interest in doing what is right to restore and use the rare piece he has, he starts getting resonable quickly himself. This particular fellow also likes to share what he has with others. However, living where he does, not many people are going to stop by and visit. So, posting pictures on eBad is one way he shares them (maybe not the way that you or I would choose, but it works for him). From a friend of mine that knows him personally, this particular eBader is an okay guy.

 

The one listing this Jewett? I do not know anything about. And his ridiculous price is not simply two to three times over a realistic market value. That Jewett is priced about 40 (forty!) times a realistic value.

 

I hope that somehow that Jewett gets a good home before the seller that believes it is worth its weight in gold leaves it outside to rot.

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My experience is someone who has no idea the value of the car.  They get the car for free or inherited, and now are hoping they won the lottery.  I have see several Graham cars in the same boat.  I have looked at the cars and left shaking my head in disbelief.  But since I am the caretaker of the Graham-Paige Registry, normally I get a story a few years later, someone walking in and getting the car for a great deal.  Unfortunately the car sits for several years normally outside deteriorating.

 

Moral of the story, they all learn what market value is eventually, and they don't care because it is just money to them.

 

The bad part is the guy is on the right track, list it on ebad, set a high reserve, list your phone number, let the auction work out and see what the market price is.  Most likely the high bidder will call, add a couple hundred and give the car a good new home.

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