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Does your classic have a personalized license plate ?


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In Maine I did, but it wasn’t worth it in North Carolina. Here’s it on my Model T. I was lucky the DMV had a computer lookup for the open plate and I printed the image before going to order it, they first said I could not have both the dash and the space on the plate but since I got the computer to accept it they tried it and it worked... know it all DMV lady wasn’t happy after I spoke with her supervisor to get it done though.

 

As for the PC Police for plates, there was a FUBAR plate running around Maine that I believe was on a US Marine Veterans vehicle which also had both Korea and Vietnam striped bumper stickers as well, I don’t think anyone would have tried to pull them from him. I figure if the guy made it through both of those wars he deserved to get any plate he wanted! For those who don’t get it, it stands for “Fu**ed up beyond all recognition” and is very much in use if you live anywhere near a military base...

5B191BD6-6BEF-4677-B05E-E81A7EDB4A24.jpeg

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I use XXXV on my 1935 Buick.   With Roman numerals no longer taught in schools, not only do they not understand Super Bowls, they ask me if this car is X rated?

XXX  XXXI, XXXI  XXXIII & XXXIV are still available.  

The Horseless Carriage tag in FL says Permanent across the bottom.  A club member got a ticket for no expiration sticker and the cop lost in court when the judge defined Permanent to be Permanent.  Apparently they don't teach English or common sense in the Police Academy.

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No pix but I had 38 PLMTH on a car of that make and vintage - also had my wife's and my initials and birth years on our modern rides.  That was when there was just a nominal one-time fee for personalized plates.  Now there's a hefty annual surcharge so we just take whatever the DMV assigns.

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Virginia has 3 options for old cars: Year of Manufacture (which I use), state-issued white on black Antique plate, and a hideous blue on yellow state-issued Antique plate that is the only one that can be personalized. The white-on-black and YOM work fine for me for their one-time permanent registration fee. The blue on yellow is also a one-time fee but if you get it personalized DMV charges you yearly for the privilege. No thanks. Plus did I mention the blue on yellow plate is damned ugly?

 

That said I've had a lot of fun with personalized plates over the years, making people guess what they mean. My favorite was on the 1976 Ninety Eight till it qualified for antique plates. I8JAPAN. Big long Godzilla-sized car. Wanted I8TOKYO but somebody had that on an early 50s Cadillac.

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I have always been to cheap to pay extra every year for a vanity plate. Now that I moved to one plate state I had fake YOM plates made with what I wanted on them. They look good on the front of my old cars and cheap compared to real YOM plates.

 

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12 hours ago, Gunsmoke said:

For Larry S, "here" is Nova Scotia, Canada. Great picture of the T Mark, could have been taken 90 years ago (except for the 2 bags ?).

 

Just wondering where and how far the political correct police have infiltrated society.  Thanks

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)
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I prefer leaving original plates on a car where possible, but my 1986 Oldsmobile 442 came from Hawaii and I had to get California plates.  So, I went with personalized plates.  W42 is the Oldsmobile option code for the 442 package.

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In NY when you register your car historically you get plates with an HX prefix. I paid the four dollars more for YOM plates. Mine are right for the year but I think they aren’t from that year. But I like the period correct look better. 

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Edited by Kevin M (see edit history)
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23 hours ago, rocketraider said:

Virginia has 3 options for old cars: Year of Manufacture (which I use), state-issued white on black Antique plate, and a hideous blue on yellow state-issued Antique plate that is the only one that can be personalized. The white-on-black and YOM work fine for me for their one-time permanent registration fee. The blue on yellow is also a one-time fee but if you get it personalized DMV charges you yearly for the privilege. No thanks. Plus did I mention the blue on yellow plate is damned ugly?

 

That said I've had a lot of fun with personalized plates over the years, making people guess what they mean. My favorite was on the 1976 Ninety Eight till it qualified for antique plates. I8JAPAN. Big long Godzilla-sized car. Wanted I8TOKYO but somebody had that on an early 50s Cadillac.

 

When Virginia first issued personalized plates, they allowed your initiials (front and rear), so for our three cars I requested, and received:

MIR-1

MIR-2

MIR-3

 

Then they offered the new Bicentennial Plates with the pic of George Washington in the center,

so I was also issued three new sets with the same:

 

MIR-1

MIR-2

MIR-3

 

I retained both of these sets of plates

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On ‎2‎/‎19‎/‎2019 at 12:25 PM, Paul Dobbin said:

I use XXXV on my 1935 Buick.   With Roman numerals no longer taught in schools, not only do they not understand Super Bowls, they ask me if this car is X rated?

XXX  XXXI, XXXI  XXXIII & XXXIV are still available.  

The Horseless Carriage tag in FL says Permanent across the bottom.  A club member got a ticket for no expiration sticker and the cop lost in court when the judge defined Permanent to be Permanent.  Apparently they don't teach English or common sense in the Police Academy.

 

 

Yep, love those Roman Numerals.  I had them on my 1973 Cadillac back in the 1980s: LXXIII.  Very few understood.  

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I have a friend that was registering a new acquisition and the lady set the plates on the counter and he noticed that the plates had his initials for letters and the numbers missed his birth day by just a couple of digits.

He asked politely if she could dig down the pile a few and got his initials and birthday for the going rate for current registration.

This guy has the best 'dumb luck' of anybody I know.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Marty

love your Packard touring car , a twin to the one in my garage 25 feet from where I am typing this.
" you know you're in heaven when you drive a car that seats seven".  My thought for the day , and I can just imagine the people who know me that are reading this are

shaking their heads and thinking 'Gosden is so corny'.  And yes, they are absolutely  correct.

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5 hours ago, Walt G said:

Marty

love your Packard touring car , a twin to the one in my garage 25 feet from where I am typing this.
" you know you're in heaven when you drive a car that seats seven".  My thought for the day , and I can just imagine the people who know me that are reading this are

shaking their heads and thinking 'Gosden is so corny'.  And yes, they are absolutely  correct.

 

Thank you Walt,

 

and yes, the 7-Passenger Packard Touring is an exceptional machine, in the garage, in the spotlight, on the road, and in the eyes of the beholder. 

Just this morning I asked my wife if I should consider getting the 1931 Chrysler Dual Cowl seen and pictured on this FORUM because I really like the design, as well as the engineering. 

Guess what she answered? 

She said "I really like our Packard".

 

Lucky us !!

 

SOME CARS JUST STAND OUT !!!

 

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SOME CARS JUST STAND OUT !!!

 

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19 hours ago, Walt G said:

Marty

love your Packard touring car , a twin to the one in my garage 25 feet from where I am typing this.
" you know you're in heaven when you drive a car that seats seven".  My thought for the day , and I can just imagine the people who know me that are reading this are

shaking their heads and thinking 'Gosden is so corny'.  And yes, they are absolutely  correct.

 

So my new wagon seats 7 - does that count?! :)

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Sure it does, most multi seat cars that are new have permanent seats - like the mini vans that used to be built did - you had to remove and relocate a seat to accommodate the number of passengers. Modern drivers are not used to seeing seats that fold and stow away in any form. Either a seat at the back of the car like your wagon Annie, or the ones like in our touring cars that fold up several times to finally land up against the back of the front seat for storage.

This "revelation" of folding extra seats hit home when a good friend from Bayside, long island, NY came over with his 3 sons for a visit a few weeks ago. I showed them the cars in my garage (the 1930 Packard and a 1940 Buick Roadmaster conv sedan) and told them to try each seat out ( front , back and in the Packard the the "jump " seats) to see what it is like. They were hesitant/ reluctant  at first and looked at their Dad to seek approval ( with a 'is Walt really gonna let us do this' look on their faces) as most collectors don't usually allow 3 kids to get in and out of their cars much less try all the seats out. They had a ball - it was an "oh wow" moment for them. It made me feel so good to see their reaction . Decades earlier friends let me sit in their pre war cars to see what it was like and I never forgot that, never will.

I don't think my friends great sons, the most polite kids you could ever meet, will forget this either. Their Dad took photos of them sitting there and I know they created some good memories that day; and  so did I.

Edited by Walt G
reword a bit (see edit history)
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Kudos to you, Walt, for having the kids "TRY OUT" your cars.

 

We try to do the same thing at Cruise Nights, and at Shows and even on Tours, offering the folks, kids, and even their grandparents the memorable moment of touching, sharing, and photographing, to capture the memory. Sometimes this may just be the moment that the elder citizen decides to enter the hobby, rather than just sit on the sidelines, ----

 

---- and to even join AACA, As Peter Heizmann will point out, 

 

You don't need to own an antique, classic, or vintage vehicle in order to join, and to support AACA, and the hobby in general. All are welcome - we are inclusive without regard to the area of interest - you can love your Yugo, Packard, Hyundai, Buick,  -  just about anything on wheels and self-propelled and intended for road use from a scooter to an exotic.

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56 minutes ago, Marty Roth said:

 

7ou don't need to own an antique, classic, or vintage vehicle in order to join, and to support AACA, and the hobby in general. All are welcome - we are inclusive without regard to the area of interest - you can love your Yugo, Packard, Hyundai, Buick,  -  just about anything on wheels and self-propelled and intended for road use from a scooter to an exotic.

 

Good point, Marty.  Years ago when I made Development & Support visits to Regions / Chapters I was amazed at how many members were not aware that you did not have to own a vehicle to join.

 

Regards,

 

Peter J.

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Marty & Peter - I joined AACA in 1965 when I was a teenager and not old enough to drive yet. My folks were not into "old" cars then but tolerated their sons madness and enthusiasm  for them and took me to car meets . They thought the people we met were really nice and then made friends and although my parents  never owned an old car helped me work on the ones I owned and we always attended meets together, they would drive my 41 Packard 120 woody and I would drive my 31 Franklin victoria. We would often swap cars - driving there and then driving home. They loved going to Hershey too !

The friendships you make are life long, and AACA is great for this. Many friends have passed away but there are many new ones as well. The cars get old(er) but the memories and friendships sustain and linger forever.

I too encourage people to ask questions at cruise nights, talk to them and let them sit in my cars. I have never seen anyone not smile because of that.

Walt

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My 1926 Franklin has an "authentic" plate on it - Authentic being one of the categories available in Michigan to register a car under. It cost $35 to register the car with a plate from the car's year of manufacture - that registration lasts as long as I own the car for that $35.

 

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(I've since had the plates refinished by Bill Scholten here in West Michigan so they're as shiny as the car is now).

 

The restrictions are

 

To qualify for an authentic license plate, the vehicle must be:

  • 26 or more years old
  • Owned solely as a collector's item
  • A vehicle registered with a regular historic plate or authentic historic plate cannot be used for general transportation. The vehicle can only used for participating in historical club activities, exhibitions, tours, parades, car shows, swap meets, and similar uses.

Those conditions are easy enough to meet.

 

Roger

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My rant here in Taxachussets.  Registry crooks strike again.  My car here regular plates which are

hand me down.  So this would be the 9 thousand registered vehicle in this state.  My father said his

father bought the first truck around here being a IH high wheeler with this plate number on it. So

he said 1908 plus or minus maybe 1910.  This number in all my days cherished by my father, he

always said when I go do not loose it.....Ok , the "who cares number plates" are 20 or 30 dollars

for passenger cars and they charge me $90 - they claim its a vanity plate which is BS.  they should 

give me the thing or at least for the price of  just a run of the mill number plate .  Another case of 

dumb and dumber  go to renew "antique" plate on Model T - go there they say plate no good?????

My face turning red,  blood pressure going up.  I don't care, at my age I tell them you idiots issued said

plates to me and you are conniving me to buy new or different ones.  Not a case of money, its a case

of principal to grind an old man as if I were some crook.  And the fee is for a 2 cent sticker I can print

on my computer.  end result; I say boy, I shall see you in court & don't care how much it cost but I

gonna fix you.  So after he meowed with the supervisor I got the sticker. two hours sitting on a 

brick bench.  Of course (after paid and said and deal done)  flipped him the twig....

Old saying  " do not mess with a old man he is likely to kill ya"  nothing to lose he lived his life

no government crook punk stops us seniors   We Paid Our Dues 

   

 

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In 2016 I was looking for a pair of Ohio year of manufacture plates at a swap met.  I was surprised to find a dealer plate for less than half price.  YOM plates run about $35 to register & are good for your life time.  I can’t tell you how many people think I am a dealer.

 

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Edited by huptoy (see edit history)
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I have owned a '64 Malibu SS convertible for the past 33 years or so.
The plates have been 64TPLSS for most of those 33 years.

 

And yes, people still ask me what year the car is.

Edited by zepher
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I designed my own and ordered them off the "net".

Zip tie the ugly real ones in front to drive to the shows and take them off while there.

I use a lot of zip ties.

 

Mike in frozen Colorado

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