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Franklin mildew


olympic
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Tried doing some work in the garage and discovered that the back of my Franklin was covered in mildew. Tried some auto cleaners and they did nothing. Went online and looked up mildew removal. Got a lot of suggestions. 50/50 solution of bleach and warm water, 70/30 solution of bleach and warm water. One answer said, Don't use bleach! Try vinegar, try Simple Green. This is the original paint on the Franklin and I don't want to ruin it. I had mildew on the Citroen this winter, but car polish took it off completely. Any ideas.

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 From Readers Digest,

 

 "

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CLEANING & ORGANIZING

 

9 Cleaning Solutions to Get Mildew Out of Any Surface

The tools and ingredients you need to rid your home of mildew for good.

 

Your first plan of attack:

 

firsttakasu/ShutterStock

When you want to remove mildew stains, reach for white vinegar first. It can be safely used without additional ventilation and can be applied to almost any surface: bathroom fixtures and tile, clothing, furniture, painted surfaces, plastic curtains, and more. To eliminate heavy mildew accumulations, use it full strength. For light stains, dilute it with an equal amount of water. You can also prevent mildew from forming on the bottoms of rugs and carpeting by misting the backs with full-strength white vinegar from a spray bottle. Plus, there are over 90 vinegar uses (white or apple cider vinegar) that can clean a lot more than just mildew."

 

 I used it to remove mold from the inside of my new convertible top.

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X2 to Roger's suggestion. A 50/50 White Vinegar/water solution should work. Don't let it dry on the surface before you rinse it with water, since vinegar is mostly acetic acid. Dry thoroughly with a towel. Follow that up with a good wax.

 

Then... do something about the lack of air movement, moisture and temperature in your garage.

Edited by Phillip Cole (see edit history)
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Thanks to everybody for their suggestions. We tried vinegar and it wouldn't touch the mildew. What did work was Simple Green. Some fellow car buffs recommended it and we tried it and it really worked. We took the trunk off this afternoon and cleaned the back of the car and the trunk rack. Also, I have 2 dehumidifiers in the garage and a 220 volt electric heater. Baltimore Gas and Electric just LOVES me when I turn that on!  Of course, last year the Baltimore area had more rain that it's ever seen, 72 inches. We dropped the fuel tank on the Franklin today so it can be cleaned. A green substance had destroyed the fuel gauge sending unit and seriously damaged the carburetor.  I am now using ethanol free gas in all the cars. Dave

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Olympic - I can appreciate your situation. Here on long island all of 2018 seemed to be rain or damp. When I had my 2 car concrete clock garage expanded several years ago I had studs put in along the walls then foam insulation blown in before the sheet rock went over that, also had a electric heater hung from the insulated ceiling in the rear of the garage and a thermostat up front near the entrance installed. Yes electric bills this winter are terrible , very high, but I look at it from the standpoint the two cars in there are not going to see their lacquer check or crack and it is dry. I figure I do not smoke, gamble ( with a race track next to me as my neighbor on two sides) or really drink so that $ I save on those ( one has to justify it somehow)  went to pay for the extra electric bill - almost !

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Just running a dehumidifier will raise the temperature, the amount depending on how much water it takes out of the air. Wet air is costly to heat because of the high specific heat of water.

 

After I insulated my garage ceiling and door, the relative humidity dropped by about 15% (because the temperature was higher) and it was easier to keep it lower. We don't get the freezing conditions you get so an air-source heat pump is cost effective for this job. You would need a ground-source heat pump if you went electric. My brother does the geotech. for them in the Boston MA area and misleadingly calls them "geothermal", which it is not.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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