1950panhead

1934 Lincoln v12 sedan

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https://rmsothebys.com/en/auctions/az19/arizona/lots/r0142-1934-lincoln-model-ka-four-door-sedan/735271

For the 1934 model year the new Lincolns featured subtle styling changes from the prior year. Most notably the radiator shells were now painted body color, and the areas that once had louvers now featured metal shutters. Additionally, the headlights were replaced with smaller units, giving the Lincoln a sleeker appearance. For 1934 Lincoln essentially offered only one model, broken down by wheelbase, the 136-in. KA and the 145-in. KB. Despite the difference in wheelbase, the cars were essentially the same. Both were powered by a 150-bhp, 414-cu. in. V-12 engine backed by a three-speed manual transmission. For the 1934 model year, Lincoln produced only 2,149 cars with the majority being of the KA, 136-in. wheelbase variant.

This 1934 Lincoln KA was completed with Four-Door Sedan (525) coachwork by Murray Body Corporation in Detroit, Michigan. The car was shipped on 8 February 1934. It is reported to have been sold new in Southern California to a wealthy family who would go on to enjoy the car for over 40 years. When it came time to part with the car, they chose to donate it to a museum where it was put on display. Following its stint in the museum, the car was purchased by a collector. To date, the car has covered less than 89,700 miles over the course of its life, preserved and maintained throughout. Presented in black with black wire wheels with factory hubcaps and blackwall tires, the car has a very conservative appearance, allowing the original owner of this Lincoln to fly under the radar with his expense Depression-era purchase. The car features the only option offered in 1934, dual side-mount spares, and in addition to the original paint, retains its original interior and glass. Within the last year the car has benefitted from a flushing and repair of the cooling system, brake system, as well as the carburetor and fuel system. The car is accompanied by its Lincoln Automobile Record, provided by The Henry Ford, specifying this car’s original build information.

Recognized as a Full Classic by the Classic Car Club of America, this 1934 Lincoln V-12 Town Sedan is a true time capsule. It is an excellent candidate for further preservation, and with its powerful V-12 engine and five-passenger occupancy, it would be a wonderful car to enjoy on a CCCA tour.

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The car is shown as having sold at $22,400. Why is it these beautiful Lincolns do not command the same sales price as a Packard or Cadillac of the same year?

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The car needs everything. Think of what it will cost to bring to the next level, and what it'll be worth at that point. When I was a kid (late '60's), I used to hang around Jack Passey's shop in San Jose. He'd often have early '30's luxury sedans (Cadillac, Lincoln, etc.), running but needing total restoration, sitting out front with what I considered incredibly low asking prices. Even at the time, $200-300 for a quality car seemed like a huge bargain. Now I know why.

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The car needs everything. Think of what it will cost to bring to the next level, and what it'll be worth at that point. When I was a kid (late '60's), I used to hang around Jack Passey's shop in San Jose. He'd often have early '30's luxury sedans (Cadillac, Lincoln, etc.), running but needing total restoration, sitting out front with what I considered incredibly low asking prices. Even at the time, $200-300 for a quality car seemed like a huge bargain. Now I know why.

So Jack sold this car for $300 in 1969, fifty years later it sells for $22.4k

That is 7466% increase over fifty years or 149% per year (non compounded)

Can anyone provide realistic prices for 79,89,99,2009 ?

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18 hours ago, 1950panhead said:

I'm not sure I get your drift, but inflation 1969-2019 makes $300 then worth about $2000 now. I suppose you could look at old issues of Antique Automobile to get a handle on historic prices, but I find that sort of research depressing. Jack Passey was a straight-shooter, treated his customers well, understood the value of an old sedan and what it would cost to restore one. The car we're talking about is a V-12, which makes it more attractive but also increases the cost of repair. If the car runs well and a buyer can drive it as-is for years without major repair, then I guess the cachet of a V-12 under the hood might be worth it. If the mechanicals aren't strong or the intent is to restore it,  it doesn't make economic sense at the asking price.

 

So Jack sold this car for $300 in 1969, fifty years later it sells for $22.4k

That is 7466% increase over fifty years or 149% per year (non compounded)

Can anyone provide realistic prices for 79,89,99,2009 ?

 

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