Lebowski

Old International Harvester tractor looks good after 76 years undersea

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...sitting on the deck of the recently discovered USS Hornet aircraft carrier which was sunk during WWII. Click on this link to read the story and see several pics including one of the tractor sitting on the deck of the upright ship more than 3 miles below the surface of the South Pacific....

 

https://www.foxnews.com/science/wreck-of-wwii-aircraft-carrier-uss-hornet-discovered-in-the-south-pacific 

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Much reverence for the 111 US sailors who lost their lives in that battle.  My late father was in the Navy during WW2.

 

I honestly wasn't aware that the ocean could get 17,500 feet deep. Many thanks to the late Paul Allen for making the effort to find this historic ship and it's lost contents.

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Probably the Hornet's greatest claim to fame is the Doolittle raid was launched from it.  Although the raid didn't do much damage, it was a huge morale/propaganda victory in retaliation for Pearl Harbor and showing that US bombers could reach Japan.  Who knows, maybe that tractor moved some of those B-25s around.

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2 hours ago, JamesR said:

I honestly wasn't aware that the ocean could get 17,500 feet deep.

 

While 17,500 ft. is really deep, it's not all that unusual.  The deepest ocean depths recorded to date are of the Challenger Deep section of the Mariana Trench at 36,000 ft.  ...  deeper than Everest is tall (29,000 ft.).  The Mariana Trench is roughly 2300 miles northwest of the Solomon Islands, where the Hornet was reported to have sunk.  Closer to home is the Puerto Rico Trench located approximately 100 miles north of the north coast of Puerto Rico.  The Puerto Rico Trench is 27,500 ft. deep and is considered to be the eighth greatest ocean depth recorded to date.

 

I think it's amazing that the crew of the late Paul Allen's ship, the R/V Petrel were able to locate and photograph the remains of the Hornet, 76 years after its sinking.  Not only is there little corrosion ( as Spinneyhill says, not much oxygen in the water) but very little growth or silt accumulation.  I'm amazed at how well preserved the painted surfaces are and am blown away by the vivid paint colors of the wrecked Grumman Wildcat airplane.

 

Another thing that leaves me awestruck is the capability to recover items from great ocean depths.  The Cockpit Voice Recorder (CVR) and Flight Data Recorder (FDR) of Air France Flight 447 were recovered from 13,000 ft. of water, two years after the crash.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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I know the camera man aboard the research ship. He was also aboard when they found the Indianapolis. It is an  amazing ship and they spend a long time searching after months of research before they even head out to sea. 

Dave S 

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Seattleites were deeply honored to have the late Pau Allen part of the great Pacific Northwest. Paul is mostly known for starting Microsoft with Bill Gates. What is little known of MR Allen is his incredible philanthropic endeavors, many of which are unknown to the general public, some better known are  Brain research, Cancer research, and many more. He had incredible wealth and shared it for the betterment of man kind. His generosity in supporting and underwriting numerous endeavors for the benefit of the world.

 

He was deeply involved in the history of World War 2 due to some of his families participation. His deep sea explorer is an extension of that interest. He also funded a world class aviation museum in Everett Washington. Many different aircraft are restored to perfection and on public display. The emphasis is WW2 war birds. I'm betting he is looking down with intense pride at the recent discovery of the USS Hornet flat top one of the greatest WW2 fighting ships . 

 

He also owned 2 professional sports teams the Portland Trailblazers, and the Seattle Seahawks. He put his money up to keep the Seahawks from being sold and moved to another city. He did this for his civic pride and for the citizens of Seattle. While being one of the richest men in the world, he was a true sports fan and a hands on owner. Before the games he could be seen walking about on the field talking to fans and members of the team and staff.  

 

Seattle collectively cried the day we heard of his passing. He was a quiet giant among men and his philanthropy and support will be felt for many years to come. When I go to  Seahawks games I look across to his suite and say a prayer for a great man now gone far to early in his life. 

 

just sayin'

 

brasscarguy

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Last week, I spent the day on the Yorktown, permanently docked at Patriots Point in Charleston SC. In the hanger deck are pictures of people who are in the Aircraft Carrier Hall of Fame. I was surprised that General Jimmy Doolittle is not among them. 

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41 minutes ago, 46 woodie said:

Last week, I spent the day on the Yorktown, permanently docked at Patriots Point in Charleston SC. In the hanger deck are pictures of people who are in the Aircraft Carrier Hall of Fame. I was surprised that General Jimmy Doolittle is not among them. 

 

 

Navy Captain Francis Low, whose part in the raid sadly is largely unknown, was the first to suggest that bombers could be launched from carriers.  Several planes were tested but only the then new B-25, which had not yet seen combat, met the requirements of the mission.  Even so, the mission was the longest ever flown by the B-25 and the planes had to be modified to carry enough fuel to reach their targets, then fly on to China.

 

All but one of the 16 bombers crashed after the raid and 7 of the 80 men died (3 KIA, 3 executed by the Japanese, and one of disease while a POW).  The Japanese killed an estimated 10,000 Chinese for assisting the raiders.  Doolittle thought he would be court-martialed for the losses, but he was promoted and all the raiders were decorated.  The raid boosted Allied morale and demonstrated to the Japanese their islands were not immune to attack.  That caused them to allocate to defense military resources which could have been used against the Allies.

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I had the honor of going up in the "Miss Barbie III", B-25, what an experience.  I have a picture of me in the rear gunner seat and it looks normal until you take a good look at the picture and see the horizon. It's then you realize the plane is banking at about a 45 degree angle. The men that flew those planes were true heroes!

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Regarding the Hornet the TV station that did a short story about the find had found a survivor and that he had remarked that if they went to his locker on a certain deck they would find $40.00 which they could have. 

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20 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

 $40.00 

 

That was enough to buy a decent used car back then. That reminds me of the time I came home on leave to Waukegan in the summer of 1971 and bought a '63 Pontiac Catalina for $125 which I drove down to Fort Benning, GA a few days later. I had to stop every 100 miles and put in 3 quarts of oil and it worked out just right because I had brought a case of 24 quarts with me and it was about an 800 mile trip.... :rolleyes:

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28 minutes ago, Lebowski said:

 

That was enough to buy a decent used car back then. That reminds me of the time I came home on leave to Waukegan in the summer of 1971 and bought a '63 Pontiac Catalina for $125 which I drove down to Fort Benning, GA a few days later. I had to stop every 100 miles and put in 3 quarts of oil and it worked out just right because I had brought a case of 24 quarts with me and it was about an 800 mile trip.... :rolleyes:

Those were the days!  I worked at a gas station in the later half of the 1960s.  We sold a lot of the re-refined motor oil at 25 cents a quart.  Basically just used motor oil that had been filtered to get the big chunks of dirt out.  I think it was packaged in Philadelphia.

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Bud Wades Texaco in Waukegan sold bulk oil for 15 cents a quart. it was made of all the leavings from all the cans sold that were drained on a big rack into a 20 or so gallon drum. All types and kinds mixed together.  When someone wanted a quart of the "good" stuff we took a quart funnel can and drew it out of the pot  This was in the late 60's and very early 70's

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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12 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

Bud Wades Texaco in Waukegan 

 

Was that at the corner of Lewis and Glen Flora? I worked at Jerry's Tex-Gas at Grand Avenue and Butrick for awhile. Besides gas he sold cigarettes and milk so I was always running in for a carton of Camels or a gallon of skim milk which was a real PITA.... :D

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11 hours ago, Lebowski said:

 

Was that at the corner of Lewis and Glen Flora? I worked at Jerry's Tex-Gas at Grand Avenue and Butrick for awhile. Besides gas he sold cigarettes and milk so I was always running in for a carton of Camels or a gallon of skim milk which was a real PITA.... :D

Wade's Texaco was at Grand and McAree(Southeast corner)kitty corner from Quonset.  The last time I went by there it was a Payless shoe store.  I bought gas from Jerry's in the mid 60's and until around 72 or so. Even bought a set of tires for my 66 Fury III from him as well. H70-14's or something like that. The building is still there although I don't know what is currently in it. Wonder whatever became of Jerry as I know it changed hands a long time ago.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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20 hours ago, plymouthcranbrook said:

  I bought gas from Jerry's in the mid 60's and until around 72 or so. Even bought a set of tires for my 66 Fury III from him as well. H70-14's or something like that. The building is still there although I don't know what is currently in it. Wonder whatever became of Jerry as I know it changed hands a long time ago.

 

I worked at Jerry's for several months in 1970 during my senior year of high school. Do you remember seeing a dark blue '65 Impala parked there? I didn't think so. LOL....

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Just now, Lebowski said:

 

I worked at Jerry's for several months in 1970 during my senior year of high school. Do you remember seeing a dark blue '65 Impala parked there? I didn't think so. LOL....

Remember how this started out about a tractor on a military ship?  I sure enjoy the twists and turns some threads take!  I worked at a Cities Service station in Minersville PA, the hard coal and hard luck area of PA.

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You probably don't remember my Powder blue 66 Fury III 2 door hard top Plymouth either. 383, 4 speed in a full size car. Amazingly fast for it's size.  Wish I could remember all the cool cars I saw back then. I can't even remember all the cars I owned in my life anymore. Must have been 50 or 60.

Edited by plymouthcranbrook (see edit history)

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