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Matt Harwood

1930 Ford Model A Tudor Sedan *SOLD*

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*SOLD* What a pretty little car! To me, this is how a Model A should look: simple, clean, dignified, not over-dressed. The restoration is 30 years old (it has a 1988 Senior National First Prize badge on it) but it looks more like 5 or 6 years old. It's quite authentic, wearing Kewanee and Elkpoint Green with traditional black fenders, and there's a wonderful shine that looks right on a '30s car. The fellow from whom I got it bought it years ago for his wife to use, but she did not drive it much so it has mostly shelf wear, not road wear, which is probably why it's held up so well. There's are some minor paint issues on the top of the hood, but I'm not even sure how to identify it--it's not checking or cracking or micro-blisters, just some marks in the finish that are almost impossible to photograph. But that's how nice the car is--the only real flaws are tough to find. There's a correct light green pinstripe, nice stainless trim, and a single taillight out back. The accessory grille guard and Boyce moto-meter are the lone pieces of dress-up, but both are a good idea on a car that you're going to want to drive.

 

The interior looks virtually new and it's beautifully trimmed. I don't know if it's a kit or Lebaron-Bonney or an expert trimmer, but it looks great. The seats are firm and comfortable, there's a proper rubber mat on the floor, and since this is a late '30, a round speedometer instrument panel. The controls are familiar with zero modifications or "upgrades" that you often find on Model As. Even the silk shade for the rear window is right.

 

The engine should look familiar to us all, and like the rest of the car, it appears to have been done by the book. Zenith carb, flat copper plug leads, two-blade fan, and a generator to make electricity. The water pump seems to be a newer leakless unit, but things like the hose clamps, wiring, and other little parts are correct. There are a few minor signs of use, but nothing you couldn't erase with some detailing. It starts easily, idles at about 400 RPM, and moves the little sedan like you'd expect. No chatter in the clutch and the brakes are effective with no pulling. Black wheels and blackwall tires are the right choice.

 

Simple is good. This is how Model As are supposed to be. Its show days are over, but this is a superior tour car that you will be proud to own and drive. And it is very reasonably priced at $19,900, so you can get in and enjoy without worries. Model As are still awesome!

 

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Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
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I see people advertising cars as Junior and Senior winners.  How do they get classified as each?

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13 hours ago, Brooklyn Beer said:

I see people advertising cars as Junior and Senior winners.  How do they get classified as each?

 

Within the AACA, cars are judged at national meets

if the owner so desires.  At a car's first appearance

at a meet, it is eligible for a "Junior" award:  First Junior,

Second Junior, or Third Junior.  At a subsequent 

national meet, the cars who previously achieved the

First Junior level can try for the Senior award.

 

The national meets are held around the country,

and the location of the meets often change each year.

A car must be pre-registered, often a month or two in advance.

At any national meet, quite a few cars may receive

the First Junior or Senior award.  To be "first" doesn't mean

that yours is the only car in your class, or the only car at

the show, achieving that level.

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3 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

Within the AACA, cars are judged at national meets

if the owner so desires.  At a car's first appearance

at a meet, it is eligible for a "Junior" award:  First Junior,

Second Junior, or Third Junior.  At a subsequent 

national meet, the cars who previously achieved the

First Junior level can try for the Senior award.

 

The national meets are held around the country,

and the location of the meets often change each year.

A car must be pre-registered, often a month or two in advance.

At any national meet, quite a few cars may receive

the First Junior or Senior award.  To be "first" doesn't mean

that yours is the only car in your class, or the only car at

the show, achieving that level.

Would this process discourage driving a car until senior judging completed successfully, lest blemishes appear from use?

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49 minutes ago, SparkEE said:

Would this process discourage driving a car until senior judging completed successfully, lest blemishes appear from use?

 

Probably.  However, I'm sure there are people

who drive their antique cars carefully during the

period when they are seeking trophies.  After the

Senior award is reached, there are more levels:

the Grand National, and the Senior Grand National.

I think only a small percentage of AACA car owners

try to reach the Grand National levels of judging.

 

I've heard many car fans say that, after they have

been through the judging processes and reached

their desired level of prize, that they will drive and

enjoy their cars.  Myself, I don't bother with judging

and drive my antique cars for enjoyment--all the time!

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