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1963 Riviera Carb and brakes

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I am wanting to upgrade the front drum brakes on my 1963 Riviera.  Can anyone suggest a quality kit?

 

I also feel I would be well served to replace the carburetor rather than try to rebuild it.  Any suggestions as to make and model best suited for the car?  Car is original with original 401 Nailhead, and Powerglide.

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

I can't help you on the brakes, but if your carburetor is in decent shape, I would rebuild it rather than replace it.  You will have to tune any new carburetor to suit your engine, AND you will have to ensure all the linkage adapts properly.  On the other hand, your Riviera likely has the original Carter AFB on it, which was tuned to your specific engine (the carb number is usually on the passenger side front of the carb if you want to check).  If it's in good shape, no new carburetor will likely work any better than that one.  Original AFBs are great carbs.  Even if you have to send it out to a trusted rebuilder (if you are at all mechanical, it's a fairly easy job doing it yourself), you will probably save money, too.

 

Another thing...1963 Rivieras use Dynaflow transmissions, not Powerglides...totally different transmission.

 

 

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While it may be argued that I have a "vested interest" in your rebuilding your original carb ;) I can assure you there is NO new carburetor out of the box that will not cost you at least an additional twice the original cost in recalibration and jury-rigging everything to work decently! And it still will probably not work nearly so well as a rebuilt original.

 

Assuming your original carb has not been molested by Dr. Goodpliers, the Carter AFB MAY possibly be the easiest four-barrel to rebuild that was ever built!

 

In the for what its worth category, the original Holley single two-barrel on my shop truck has been replaced with TWO AFB's, at a significant increase in both fuel economy AND power.

 

Jon.

Edited by carbking (see edit history)
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I can help you with stock brakes....

Master Cylinder, Wheel Cylinders, Brake Hoses, Brake Shoes, Brake Hardware, Wheel Bearings & Seals, & NEW N.O.S. Brake Drums...

Always best to simply call me -- Craig -- 516 - 485 - 1935....

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The drum brakes on the 63 Riviera were some of the best in the industry due to the finned aluminum drums, do a good rebuild of the system and all will be well.

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On 2/12/2019 at 2:36 PM, TexRiv_63 said:

The drum brakes on the 63 Riviera were some of the best in the industry due to the finned aluminum drums, do a good rebuild of the system and all will be well.

Tex Riv, been lucky in my life having driven raggedy assed 26 foot hay:straw trucks with no brake failure. Never thought about the brakes as a kid.

I went to work rebuilding my drum brake essentially with everything new or rebuilt. The brake pedal went to the floor. I pumped the brake pedal ang got the car the 63 Riv to stop pretty good.

Well, I figured the leaky seals on the axle and rear end needed attention. Both axle seals were cleaned, inspected and installed by Tom Telesco from Norwalk CT. I told Tom about the pedal problem. Tom noticed a spring with cap and pin that connected to the wheel backing plate was loose. Tom said he thought that loose connection would cause the brake self adjusters to not work. Tom made what I call a brake spoon and adjusted the brakes. I have plenty of brake pedal now thanks to Tom Telesco’s know how. Car stops good.

I would admit having disc brakes on the front would give so major league stopping power. Actually, what I have is great for my driving style.

Hope your Monico is still “ cool” in the summer.  
I had good cool air all last summer, but at the end A leak occurred and now I’ve got to start over with evacuating and replacing all the O rings. Find the leak and filler up again with dry nitrogen and see if I can find the leak. Were it ez I would not have as much fun.

Turbinator

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