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Redoing the console in my 65 with a new quarter sawn walnut kit. I have heard to use spray adhesive, Gorilla Glue (sparingly), and others. What have y'all used to glue these wood panels down with, and what's the best technique? I have the old wood on these pieces completely removed, and acetoned off all the old adhesive. The kit I have is strictly wood, no foil or metal backing.

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3M spray adhesive will do the job.  Mask everything before you spray.  If you're anal, cover the front of the wood with low-tack tape to avoid the accidental glue smear while handling.

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Gorilla Glue is my new favorite thing.  Applies fairly easy, cleans up off hands easy, gets somewhat tacky fairly quickly, and holds extremely well.

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I am actually pretty Suprised you removed all the glue/adhesive with acetone.  I tried acetone, mek etc.. The only way I could get it all completely removed was aircraft stripper and a razor blade. Anyhow I used 3M Super 77 . 3m makes multiple adhesives some are better than others. I spray both pieces until tacky then set the vieneer on. I used welding clamps and wood to get equal pressure everywhere. Method is on you, just make sure it is held in place somehow until dried.

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When working with a contact adhesive you need to make sure that the first time the two coated surfaces touch that you're perfectly lined up where you want them.  There's no adjustment.  I've also heard of guys using sand bags, especially on uneven surfaces, to make sure that weight is evenly distributed.

 

Ed

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19 minutes ago, RivNut said:

When working with a contact adhesive you need to make sure that the first time the two coated surfaces touch that you're perfectly lined up where you want them.  There's no adjustment.  I've also heard of guys using sand bags, especially on uneven surfaces, to make sure that weight is evenly distributed.

 

Ed

I actually used a couple full boxes of shotgun shells. Adapt and overcome lol.

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If you really thought about it, a really thick big  balloon filled with water would reach every nook an cranny and be level and heavy enough to hold the veneer down.

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34 minutes ago, RivNut said:

If you really thought about it, a really thick big  balloon filled with water would reach every nook an cranny and be level and heavy enough to hold the veneer down.

Now THAT'S thinking outside the box lol.

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Gents, I’ve discovered two part clear epoxy. So far the epoxy beats any glue I’ve ever used. True you’ve got to mix and mix by the directions, but the stuff works better than any adhesive I’ve used in the past.

Turninator

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6 hours ago, Turbinator said:

Gents, I’ve discovered two part clear epoxy. So far the epoxy beats any glue I’ve ever used. True you’ve got to mix and mix by the directions, but the stuff works better than any adhesive I’ve used in the past.

Turninator

No, No,NO! If you use two part epoxy you will never be able to change the wood out ever again because it won't come off. Use 3M weatherstrip cement.

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Winston, good information regarding wood inlays on the console?

My use of the two part epoxy was for securing the tops of buttons on my upholstery from coming off. Clark’s buttons are not good. The tops keep coming off. So I use a two part clear epoxy to hold the tops on the button base.

Turbinator

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10 hours ago, Eric's.64.Superwildcat said:

What is the name of the product?

Clear Casting Coating epoxy resin 16 Oz kit. Amazon has the product.

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A small amount of heat will remove the wood inlay.  In all honesty once you do the replacement do you think anyone will want to go through the hassle of changing it again.  If for some reason the guy who is then taken the responsibility of preserving a piece of history/future caretaker it's now HIS PROBLEM & possibly & more than likely not yours.

 

Tom T.

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