JeffreyJ

So I found a TC, what it worth to yah?

Recommended Posts

My first thought was MG TC ha ha. But I like the LeBaron convertibles though I never had one. Do you think you could fix the engine if it is something minor? If you have to take it to a garage it could get expensive.

 

I would make an offer, try to to buy it for $500 or so and gamble that I could get it running nice. There are a couple of tests you can do to see how bad the engine is, one is to take off the oil cap with the engine running and check for blowby. Another is to hold a piece of paper up to the tailpipe, if it gets sucked against the tailpipe it is a sign of a burn exhaust valve. Another is, does it turn over evenly on the starter? If it kind of skips one cylinder it could mean that cylinder has no compression.

 

You can't expect too much for that little money. I would buy it if I could put a few hundred more into it and have a fun summer car. You aren't going to buy a 67 Camaro convertible for that kind of dough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fact they’re saying it shares the braking system of a Jaguar scares the life out of me.$$$$

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it would clean up well and be a fun car.  If no rust or major body issues, I think it would be a nice buy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There may be some similarities to a LaBaron platform, but its not the same. The TC Maserati is shorter I think.

None of my TC Maserati's had any LaBaron badging.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, JACK M said:

There may be some similarities to a LaBaron platform, but its not the same. The TC Maserati is shorter I think.

None of my TC Maserati's had any LaBaron badging.

 

The TC is a different chassis and body than any other Chrysler product.  None of the body panels will interchange with the LeBaron.  Some, but not all,  mechanical parts come from the K-Car parts bin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The fact they’re saying it shares the braking system of a Jaguar scares the life out of me." well it also shares it with a few Buicks, Pontiacs, and Cadillacs...and a Ford.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, padgett said:

"The fact they’re saying it shares the braking system of a Jaguar scares the life out of me." well it also shares it with a few Buicks, Pontiacs, and Cadillacs...and a Ford. 

 

Yep. The same brake system was used on several cars in it's day. Most were top of the line cars. 

 

1985 to 1989 Lincoln Continental
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1985 to 1992 Lincoln Mark VII
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1987 to 1992 Ford Thunderbird
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1987 to 1992 Mercury Cougar
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1987 to 1993 Saab 9000
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1988 to 1989 Merkur Scorpio
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1988 to 1991 Peugeot 505
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1991 to 1993 Saab 900
spaclear-fit-1x1.gif1991 to 1993 Volkswagen Passat

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Rusty_OToole said:

What is unique about the braking system?

It is one of the first ABS systems and it is controlled by computer technology from the late 1980's.  Add in hard to find parts like accumulators and wear items like wheel sensors make servicing/repair problematic.  Not impossible, just problematic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I realize its all all what you like, but I still think it’s an under appreciated vehicle that can only go up in value...

 

To put it into a sharp perspective, I ordered a full wiring kit for my “new” Pierce Arrow which is around $100.00 more than the OP’s car... Just saying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Mark Wetherbee said:

I realize its all all what you like, but I still think it’s an under appreciated vehicle that can only go up in value...

 

To put it into a sharp perspective, I ordered a full wiring kit for my “new” Pierce Arrow which is around $100.00 more than the OP’s car... Just saying.

The crystal ball view is always tough to call.  I wonder too what will be overlooked or put down and then rise to desirability.  A little too new yet but the two seater Saturn / Pontiacs seem to stand out as a future collector car.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the idea of finding undervalued collectibles (cars or anything else) instead of established icons. Two seaters will always have an automatic appeal because of their mostly "for fun" market niche. I think the Fiero, Allante and Reatta are all cool undervalued two seaters, as well. All of them tried to channel the spirit of the first T birds during that time, as did the last T birds several years later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Recommend you put your money in a real TC.  Here is Susan's 1948 parked next to its cousin, our 1935 Morris 8.

TC and Morris 8 Resized.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2019 at 8:46 PM, 1912Staver said:

MGTC ? how old are you guys, I immediately thought Rover 2000TC.  { just pulling your leg about age} . Actually these were quite decent sellers for Rover however they were { like the Chrysler TC} complex, difficult to keep running and in North America fast depreciators.  Rarely seen today however a small cult following especially the v8 Rover 3500 version.

 

Greg in Canada,... An MGTF in my past but no TC

Age is not a number ;)

 

First engine I helped rebuild was an MG-TC. Had to carry the engine to the basement for rebuilding. Difficult to hold the engine, so pulled engine and transmission together!

 

Jon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I definitely was a big fan of TC's up until I drove one.  By then I had a few years of MGA ownership and I am afraid the TC was definitely a disappointment. It was the later 1970's and I was young so I used my sports cars to the limit of their performance. And well beyond on the Autocross track. A couple of friends and I campaigned a much modified Bug Eye for a few season's, "spin or win " was our motto. We did lots of both. Tires were not very grippy in those days. 

   TC's looked great and were no doubt great cars in the context of the late 1930's . I consider the TC to be really just a slightly improved version of the TA. At least as far a general character is concerned. However by the late 1970's they were definitely archaic.

  My MGA could hold its own as a daily use sports car. And even more so once I installed a MGB 1800 , slightly wider Triumph wheels and 185 Michelin XWX's. I lived in the burbs and commuted in to town to my job as a British car mechanic so lots of quasi legal speed highway driving.  

  The TC is a gem but just so limited for regular use. My TF had been swapped to MGB  {engine , gearbox, rear end } power long before it came into my ownership so it was also quite usable.  A TVR and a Lotus Europa came next so you can see where my priorities were in those days.

 

Greg in Canada   ,,   still an MGA owner all these years later, TF long gone to fund going back to school

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, carbking said:

Age is not a number ;)

 

First engine I helped rebuild was an MG-TC. Had to carry the engine to the basement for rebuilding. Difficult to hold the engine, so pulled engine and transmission together!

 

Jon.

I have fond memories of a friend who passed at much too young of age, he and I carried his 1960 Morris Minor engine into the basement so he could rebuild it.  This was mid 1970s and the Morris was a convertible.  He was about 19 and I was about 24.  The Morris got restored and he enjoyed it for several years.  A Sunbeam Alpine later joined the Morris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now