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convertible top tack area wood repairs


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I have a couple of top bows on my 1925 Buick that are still good, but there are a few spots that are a little chewed up from multiple top replacements and a few too many tacks in one place.  For the better area, I have used toothpicks and I dip them in Epoxy and then break them off in the old tack holes.  I have used 2 part epoxy mixed with sawdust to fill bigger spots like this, but it is still a little too hard to drive tacks thru.  Maybe a Urethane glue mixed with the sawdust would work better.  Has anyone had any luck with a filler?  I would think that some convertible top shops might use something, but there are not a lot of them around these days.  

 Thank you,    Hugh

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Sometimes a bow is too far gone and its better to replace the wood bow altogether.

This is precisely what a Polol can do. https://www.polyall.com/

Available from Canada.

This article should help understand what a Polol can do. Unfortunately Kwik Poly is no longer available, but the Polyall 2000 should provide equal results

http://www.secondchancegarage.com/public4/kwikpoly-1.cfm

Note the use of Pipettes to dispense in small quantities.

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I've filled bad spots with Kwik Poly, mentioned above, and had no problems with getting tacks into it.  At some point, also as mentioned, it's best to replace the bad bow.

 

One thing you want to be sure of is that the new bow has the EXACT curve and dimensions of the original bow.  "Close enough" will not always work in this application, as the bow shape, particularly the rear bow, is designed to be able to have a smooth top transition to the body.

 

I know this from personal experience, having done a car that had a replaced rear bow that was incorrect, and nothing I could do could get the rear curtains to fit without wrinkles.

 

Remember that things were done on the manufacture of these cars for a reason, there was thought and engineering behind design, it wasn't just random....

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On 2/7/2019 at 12:22 AM, Hubert_25-25 said:

I have a couple of top bows on my 1925 Buick that are still good, but there are a few spots that are a little chewed up from multiple top replacements and a few too many tacks in one place.  For the better area, I have used toothpicks and I dip them in Epoxy and then break them off in the old tack holes.  I have used 2 part epoxy mixed with sawdust to fill bigger spots like this, but it is still a little too hard to drive tacks thru.  Maybe a Urethane glue mixed with the sawdust would work better.  Has anyone had any luck with a filler?  I would think that some convertible top shops might use something, but there are not a lot of them around these days.  

 Thank you,    Hugh

IMG_7604.thumb.JPG.414ef786f2b212ede9dc1ae7b201f643.JPG

My friend simply applied PL200 consruction adhesive. Smooth with putty knife. Holds tacks great, but doesnt have brittle, hard surface like epoxies. If too thick when "dry" use "cheese grater" type file to take it down.

Edited by Guest (see edit history)
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  • 2 weeks later...

They only stopped production in January - you should be able to get via such as ebay, maybe amazon, and ....  

 

And, if needed, as a substitute you can just use fine wooden dowel rod (it comes in a multitude of diameters) and drill into each nail hole and peg (use a good wood glue when inserting dowels). 

 

https://www.snydersantiqueauto.com/kwik-poly

 

https://www.modeltford.com/item/KWIK-POLY.aspx

 

https://www.nctoolco.com/shop/hoofcare/hoof-repair/kwik-poly/c/430

 

https://www.centaurforge.com/Kwik-Poly-32-oz-Filler-Coating-and-Bonding-Agent/productinfo/KWIK32/

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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West System is a wonderful product that doesn't seem to get much mention.  Their 105 resin and 205 (fast) or 206 (slow) hardener mixed thickened (if necessary) with 406 colloidal silica provides a lot more options for different applications and enough working time so that you don't have to mix up so many small batches to do a job like you do with Kwik-Poly or other hyper-fast setting epoxies. 

 

 

 

 

Edited by W_Higgins (see edit history)
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  • 6 months later...

I wanted to follow up on this as I have finished the repairs to my top bows.  Installing tooth picks and pieces of wood dowel with Epoxy glue works well, but it is rather time consuming.  I was also missing pieces of wood in certain areas.  Attached is my technical paper.       Hugh

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