skyler

driveshaft lubrication

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doing the universals on my 54 Windsor. the Chrysler manual gave me no idea of how to remove the old universals. my motors manual gave  nice step by step instructions on how to do it with ordinary tools. pays to have more than one manual. the front of the driveshaft has something called a pressure relief valve in the center inside of the yoke area. i have never seen or heard of these before. what pressure is it relieving? the manual also says the driveshaft needs 140 Wt oil in this area. do i just pull the valve and pour oil in there? how much if any. thanks for any info on this.      dennis 

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hard to believe that nobody knows about the pressure relief valve. anyway, there obviously is some oil in there as i see it on the shaft when it slides in and out, so i just pumped in a little grease and put the valve back in. now i am trying to get the drum off for the handbrake as i noticed the star adjuster is not installed correctly on the brake shoe and i need to adjust it. not sure if the shoes now will hold it stationary to remove the nut that holds on the drum. afraid to use an impact driver.  wish me luck.      dennis

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A guess: as the back axle goes up and down, the drive shaft shortens and lengthens. There is no other way for the air to get out, other than along the spline in the yoke, which would blow the oil out. So they installed a pressure relief valve. Hot air also takes a larger volume than cold so would come out. I hope it is a two way valve.

 

What is the capacity of the SAE 140 oil "in this area" and what area is it? How about a picture, even of the MoToR's picture(s).

 

Edit: is it a Detroit Ball and Trunnion Joint? Same idea, as the drive shaft shortens and lengthens, it happens in the joint so air has to come and go. 1950 MoToR's only shows a grease plug on the joint.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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spinney, you are right about the relief valve. the manual does not give an amount of oil. i do not know how to post pictures. it is the cross and roller type, no grease fitting. by looking at it probably no more than about 2 oz of oil. i did get the handbrake drum off. the star adjuster was installed wrong, so i got it in right and got the brake adjusted. still looking for a muffler, but i have a lead to check tomorrow.    dennis

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No gear lube oil is used on any old MoPar center driveline carriers except maybe the 30's cars...BIG CW Imperial Airflow, LB Chrysler's CG's etc... see photo...

They take up to 2 pints of lube oil.

Also shown are the 1954 Windsor Six Chrysler "Winged U-Joints"....... very hard to find.

You can see the slip joint threaded cap and in the middle you can just see the excess grease bleed off hole...

 

CW Frame Carrier Bearing Case  (3).JPG

U-Jounts 1954 Chrysler Six Windsor (2).JPG

U-Jounts 1954 Chrysler Six Windsor (3).JPG

Edited by c49er (see edit history)

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c49, if you could look through the hole in the center of the u joint in the second photo, you would see in the center of the driveshaft the pressure relief valve. it comes out with a 3/8 or 7/16 wrench and some gear oil is supposed to go in there. that is in my 1954 Chrysler factory manual. when the u joint is removed it is very evident. and yes, the winged u joints are not easily found.     dennis

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I went through both my 1953 and 1954 Chrysler Shop manuals to understand this proper lube of the  spline joint...

The 1940-52 Chryslers use grease on the splined slip joint. A grease fitting is on the splined  yoke on the early cars.

The 1953 and 54 Chrysler made a change to lube as you have made me aware of....

Thank you on that.

Some info out of both the 1953 ad 54 Chrysler Shop manuals..

 

IMG_5477.JPG

IMG_5475.JPG

IMG_5476.JPG

Edited by c49er (see edit history)

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c49, thanks for the info. 53 and 54 are odd ducks. often when i look for parts they are listed thru 52 and then 55 and above. fender skirts are a good example. i am still looking for them. the kind that go in the wheel well. i have seen them,just can't find a set.also, do you know what the difference is between long and short fiber grease that is mentioned in this manual?what is fiber grease? sounds like stuff you can't get and probably don't need. thanks again.    dennis

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Here is a discussion about grease, including fibrous grease.

Some grease  basics: https://www.reliability.com/understanding-basics-grease/

From this web site, I think "long fibre" and "short fibre" greases are different types. Sodium-soap greases have a fibrous texture.

 

These days, a general purpose synthetic grease should do most jobs for you.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)
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