BucketofBolts

1933 Studebaker Model 92 Speedway St Regis coupe.

Recommended Posts

23 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

I concur, but also add that the rearward slant of the grilles gave them a daring, windswept look,

 

 

Yup, that's about when manufacturers started using "streamlined" design.  The idea was to reduce wind resistance but it also helped the appearance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Speedway, as well as all 1933 Studebakers have always been special to me. I had some input in a friend's purchase, and aided in the restoration, of the 33 sedan now in the Studebaker museum, in South Bend. Thirty years ago, I also had to turn down the 33, seven passenger car, in British Columbia.

 

The 1932-33 Studebaker share the same body style, with the 1932 Pierce Arrow Model 54, and the 1933,  836/1236. While the body stampings, and everything from the cowl forward, the gas tank cover and the running boards, are different, the body lines are essentially the same. Thirty five years ago I asked Otto Klausmeyer, Studebaker engineer and later PA technical editor, about the source of the design. I was interested in finding the name of the stylist who originally penned the design. I also asked if he could shed some light on the reasoning behind the process for determining its use for both marques. While he didn't give me a name of the stylist, he did say that the reason for the two using the same body lines, was because AL Erskine, as president of Studebaker/Pierce Arrow, was very partial to the design. He said to understand the process you had to realize how important Erskine was to every aspect of the company. To understand, think about how much impact Henry Ford had on Ford motor company. This is what Erskine was to Studebaker, and later Studebaker/PA.

 

I have owned a 1933 Pierce Arrow 836 for forty two years (I also own a 1931 President, 80R "Four Season Roadster"). As I indicated I have also been closely connected to the 1933 Speedway, and all 33's for that mater, for almost as long. So seeing the two cars together, has afforded me some special, if not unique perspective. 

 

As an aside, the 1932 Graham Blue Streak was the styling game changer for the whole industry. Northup's beautiful design became motivation for virtually every styling change, for the next few years. 

 

Bill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/3/2019 at 10:10 PM, Steve9 said:

I can’t believe someone hot rodded the car in West’s post. What a waste. Cheesy mags too.

Not just hot rodded it, but cut into the front fenders and made a wider side mount well for those tires.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears to me still that the 1933 Studebaker Speedway St Regis President coupe is still a model that appears not to have any existing units that survived. Am I correct? [See first post on this topic].   Would be super if this vehicle survived. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to understand the last post. There is a contradiction in the terminology used. There is a coupe and there is the St Regis Brougham. The coupe would be a three window coupe, while the St Regis Brougham is a close coupled, two door sedan. As I indicated in a previous post that there is at least one and maybe two St Regis Broughams that have survived. The coupe is a little more up in the air. I believe that there is one of those which has survived, but I will do some checking and make sure.

Bill 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See post from 58L-Y8 made 2/2/2019. With the shorter units there was a notch in the bottom of the door so that the door would open with the rear fender. On the longer Model 92 the wheelbase at 135 inches made it where the door was square with no notch as the fenders did not interfere with the door. The Model 92 was more costly and longer and made a more sleek look. The green & blue colored photo of the earlier black & white 1933 factory photo found on page #1 of this string post is the lost series 92 (my opinion). From my observation no surviving units of the Model 92 for the 2-door St Regis Speedway President have survived. My belief is that less than 100 of these units for this model 92 (St Regis Speedway President) were ever made. If I am wrong I would love to see a surviving example. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...