FLYER15015

H2O Pump new or rebuild ?

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Hi all,

I am getting ready to do some work on the '31 Chrysler Imperial engine, Tx and brakes.

First up is the H2O pump, which is dripping out the weep hole, and as it looks like the brass packing nut is all the way in, so she needs to come off for a closer inspection.

Being fairly mechanical, my question is would I be better off rebuilding it myself, or sending it out for a rebuild / upgrade ?

Are there sealed bearing kits available ?

Looking for advice from someone who has walked this path before.

OR has anyone had experience with :Flying Dutchman Water Pump Rebuilders in Oregon ?

They say that they can rebuild any pump.

 

Let the discussion begin............

 

Mike in Colorado

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Have a look at how my awesome wife repaired the water pump on my 1935 Lincoln:

 

 

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Repacking will work if the shaft is still smooth. Otherwise it will leak.

 

I overhauled mine (Dodge 8). It has Oilite bushes, which are damned expensive in this country. Spares are not available of course. I adapted some to fit, which means very careful work in the lathe with a very sharp tool. I also made a new shaft. Chrysler developed these bushes so I expect yours will have them too.

 

To determine if you need a rebuild, take the drive belt off it and see how much movement there is in the shaft. If it is more than two or three thou' laterally and there is much end float, time to rebuild it. If the shaft is not smooth at the gland, you might be able to polish it, but otherwise it might need replacing.

 

Your use of Tx for something (transmission?) made me smile. In medical-speak that is used for "transplant".

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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I had my REO pump rebuilt with a modern seal. No more leaks, no packing to mess with. 

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I sent my pump to a rebuilder out West and it lasted for less than 10 miles. Front bushing seized up on the shaft and broke the pump in half! He said I didn't put any lube in the coolant and would not repair or refund any money. On a  1930 Chrysler pump, the water/coolant doesn't get close to the front bushing. I had the packing nut bored to install a lip seal and used oilite bushings and haven't had a problem since. I did make a new shaft for the pump too so it was smooth.

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Shove some packing in it. The worst it can do is leak. Keep in mind it needs to leak a tiny bit to keep from destroying itself.

 

Yes, there are guys who can convert it to modern parts. I sure wouldn't do it on a whim. If the insides are completely destroyed, I might consider it. Keep in mind that with the stock setup if it starts leaking excessively you can just tighten the nut a little. On a modern system a leak indicates complete failure.

 

 

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18 hours ago, stvaughn said:

I had my REO pump rebuilt with a modern seal. No more leaks, no packing to mess with. 

Want to tell us who did this ?

 

2 hours ago, Tim Wolfe said:

I sent my pump to a rebuilder out West and it lasted for less than 10 miles. Front bushing seized up on the shaft and broke the pump in half! He said I didn't put any lube in the coolant and would not repair or refund any money. On a  1930 Chrysler pump, the water/coolant doesn't get close to the front bushing. I had the packing nut bored to install a lip seal and used oilite bushings and haven't had a problem since. I did make a new shaft for the pump too so it was smooth.

Want to tell us who did this ?

 

Since Bert's Model "A" in Denver is a good customer of mine (lots of replica parts), I can pull the pump and let Steve have a look at it very easily.

I would like to look in the head anyway and maybe do some back flushing on the radiator, though she runs quite cool now.

 

Thanks to all, and I very much enjoyed reading Matt's adventures with the Lincoln.

Glad he had a Buick to fall back on.

So do I, but I kind of like playing with the Chrysler.

So much more primitive. Kind of like a big model "A".

 

Mike in Colorado

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14 minutes ago, FLYER15015 said:

Want to tell us who did this ?

 

Want to tell us who did this ?

 

Since Bert's Model "A" in Denver is a good customer of mine (lots of replica parts), I can pull the pump and let Steve have a look at it very easily.

I would like to look in the head anyway and maybe do some back flushing on the radiator, though she runs quite cool now.

 

Thanks to all, and I very much enjoyed reading Matt's adventures with the Lincoln.

Glad he had a Buick to fall back on.

So do I, but I kind of like playing with the Chrysler.

So much more primitive. Kind of like a big model "A".

 

Mike in Colorado

Dan Koehler, Winneconne, WI 929-221-0427

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I had the pump for my ‘39 Imperial rebuilt by Flying Dutchman and I was very pleased with the workmanship and the price. Those straight eight Chryslers were known to get hot and a big part of that was poor flow from the pump. The stock pump (it was the same for ‘38, 39 & 40) had a little 2 paddle impeller which was not very efficient. So “Flying Dutchman” machined the back of the housing (cleaned it up for better flow) and replaced the paddle with a more modern multi finned impeller. They also installed new bearings, cleaned up the shaft, (it didn’t need to be machined) and sent it back with new gaskets so she was ready to go. I can’t believe the difference it’s made...the car runs much cooler and I no longer worry about it overheating like I used to. 

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When doing the cooling system, you might also want to check the water distribution tube for even spread of cooling water in the back of the engine. I did get some assurance when a laser thermometer displayed no excessive heat in the rear.

 

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I will say that my pump wasn't rebuilt by the Flying Dutchman, I can't remember the name of the company-but it was in Arizona.

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Just as an update, I pulled the pump and due to the condition of the shaft (pretty nasty) I sent her off to the "Flying Dutchman" for a rebuild.

I'll report back on what was necessary.  Wade has already told me that he will use a hex brass compression nut, rather than the "notched" version that is in her now.

And that the final cost will be determined by the condition of the shaft.

Stand by for further info.

 

Mike in Colorado

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Just got a call from Wade Jenezon, The Flying Dutchman, and my H2O pump is on it's way back as of today.

She now has a sealed bearing up front. Packing nut was converted from a "tanged" part that uses a screwdriver and hammer to tighten, to a nut.

Teflon packing in the rear. New impeller and re-machined and polished shaft.

Re- machined housing out back for a tight fit.

 

All in all the cost was $200.00 + $14.00 UPS for the return trip.

 

Considering the disaster I sent Wade, I thought the cost was very reasonable.

 

Can't wait to get it back on and do some driving...............

 

Thanks Wade !!!!!

 

Mike in Colorado

 

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PUMP IS BACK AND IT IS BEAUTIFUL !!!!!!

Thanks to Mr. Wade Jenezon @ The flying Dutchman.

For your viewing pleasure...............

 

Mike in Colorado

WATER PUMP 001.JPG

WATER PUMP 002.JPG

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Several drives to town (for ice cream w/ my grand son, 9 ) which is about 30 miles round trip.

Nary a drop as was installed as was  received from Wade.

I have not touched the "nut" yet and won't till I see one.

 

Mike in Colorado

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