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lionalfa750

Help with Pilot Ray Driving Light set up

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Hi, 

 

I am trying to connect a set of Pilot Ray Driving lights on 1925 243 Series Packard and would need some help figuring out how are these connected to the swivel linkage attachment that goes to the car steering mechanism. Can someone assists with photos on how these attached to the steering mechanism? All help will be greatly appreciated.

 

Lionel

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There should be an intermediate swing bracket that will get mounted between the pitman arm and the light housing. Where the bracket gets mounted on the pitman arm will determine the amount of throw the rods will have on the light's arm. PM me and perhaps we can talk on the phone, I'm on the east Coast, available most days and evenings. Chris

Edited by Friartuck
typo (see edit history)
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Here are a few photos of a 1930 Cadillac that featured Pilot Rays. I don't have any specific photos of the linkage, but you should be able to see most of it in the photos. Sorry, that's all I've got, hope it's helpful.

 

 

 

 

Linkage1.jpg

Linkage2.jpg

Linkage3.jpg

Linkage4.jpg

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Attached is a photo of the intermediate linkage bracket ( also on a '31 Cadillac). The rod to the left is the same rod as shown in Matt Harwood's last photo - it connects to the bell crank at the front of the car. The rod to the right connects via the same type of clevis shown to a bracket on the pitman arm. On Cadillacs, that bracket was two pieces of thin strap that clamped around the arm with two bolts. One strap had an additional hole to attach the clevis. You can see most of that bracket where Matt had the red arrow in his first photo. I don't know about Packards, but I suspect the linkage they used was similar.

 Realize that there were several different types of brackets designed to mount the "universal"  light mounting tube to various types of cars. Those chrome brackets varied in height, curvature and design of their lower end in method of attachment to the car. I see getting those right as a bigger hurdle than the actuating linkage, which is easy to fabricate. Also attached is a photo of a single pilot ray installation with the chrome brackets visible.

31 caddy left frame detail.jpg

elegance 15.JPG

Edited by Penske PC-7 (see edit history)
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First of all, I want to thanks everyone for the prompt responses and photos. 

 

I was looking at a Pilot Ray diagram where they list a series of attachments and hardware and I was able to determine that there would be different applications according to the different models. http://theoldmotor.com/?p=133530 If you look at the diagram you will see at the bottom of the page item 1 that same as the photo I provided for which I believe performs the same function as the one on the second photo. 

 

Here are a couple photos of what I have, and we can determine what I am missing. I am going to take additional photos of my 1925 Packard to determine what I will need. I do not have the intermediate part as seen on Penske first photo and I might need that part.  I got the feeling that I will have to make that intermediate part unless I can find one to complete my Pilot Ray set up.  On the two photos below, I don't know where the first one goes. I got the feeling that the second might be for a similar function but to another car application. Again, thanks to everyone for their contribution. Kind regards, Lionel

IMG_0723.JPG

IMG_0724.JPG

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You may not need a mid-linkage pivot. Sometimes you just need to shape the connecting rod to clear the suspension travel.

 

The Pilot Ray set did not come with the connecting rod, so I had to make one to fit the 132 inch wheelbase car the set was going on. I used 1/2 inch, thick-wall steel tubing from a steel supply dealer and cut a female thread in each end for the jaw and clevis pin fitting.  Works very well. And with the connecting rod actually being a  hollow tube it doesn't whip up and down as much as a solid rod would.

 

To find where to put the clamp on the steering pitman arm, I jacked up the front end and put the steering wheels over to full turns.Then the Pilot Ray bucket to it's full  matching turns and saw where on the arm attaching the connecting rod pivot would allow only that much travel of the Pilot Ray bucket.

 

Paul  

Edited by PFitz (see edit history)
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The first photo looks like the mid-linkage pivot, perhaps one that would attach to something that was already in place on the car.

 

The second photo looks like the bracket that attaches to the steering arm.

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1 hour ago, Matt Harwood said:

The first photo looks like the mid-linkage pivot, perhaps one that would attach to something that was already in place on the car.

 

The second photo looks like the bracket that attaches to the steering arm.

 

Actually, the bracket shown in the first photo is the one that goes on the pitman arm. ( AT LEAST ON A CADILLAC, so take my comments with a grain of salt) The large hole on the right side of the photo would be oriented to 12:00. That large hole goes around the large nut where the pitman arm is connected to the steering box. The small tab is bent flat against the large nut. The part of the bracket with the strap and two bolts therefore faces the floor and clamps around the pitman arm. The remaining hole in that bracket is where the rod end clevis attaches. I am 100% on that, but again - on a Cadillac.

I've never seen a bracket like the one in the second photo, however I have never put a set of pilot rays on a Packard, but have put two complete sets on Cadillacs. It may be a Packard specific bracket. It looks to be #33 on the Old Motor diagram you provided and Matt Harwood is also correct in that that bracket IS shown clamped to a steering rod ( INSTEAD of the pitman arm)  I'm trying to help, but hopefully someone will chime in who has installed a set on a Packard.You may have a mismatch of brackets meant for different makes of cars.

The rod involved would be very long without the center pivot bracket. The one I attached a photo of was an original. They were cast. Don Sommer at American Arrow Corporation builds Pilot Rays new complete with linkages. I can't say whether or not he will sell just the linkage. His complete kits are expensive, but probably worth it over something that is worn out and doesn't fit correctly, especially if you are going to have to have chrome work done on what you have.     https://americanarrowcorp.com/shop/

Edited by Penske PC-7 (see edit history)
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I agree with Penske , the Pilot Ray ;light I had on my 31 Franklin used the bracket as shown in the first photo exactly as Penske describes. On the one I had ( all original parts, rods etc) there never was an intermediate pivot point or pin off the chassis.. As Paul describes it is best to get the front axle up in the air so you can turn the steering wheel back and forth to see what range of travel you need when you are mounting the brackets. Not a big deal just takes time and patience like everything else.

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9 hours ago, lionalfa750 said:

First of all, I want to thanks everyone for the prompt responses and photos. 

 

I was looking at a Pilot Ray diagram where they list a series of attachments and hardware and I was able to determine that there would be different applications according to the different models. http://theoldmotor.com/?p=133530 If you look at the diagram you will see at the bottom of the page item 1 that same as the photo I provided for which I believe performs the same function as the one on the second photo. 

 

Here are a couple photos of what I have, and we can determine what I am missing. I am going to take additional photos of my 1925 Packard to determine what I will need. I do not have the intermediate part as seen on Penske first photo and I might need that part.  I got the feeling that I will have to make that intermediate part unless I can find one to complete my Pilot Ray set up.  On the two photos below, I don't know where the first one goes. I got the feeling that the second might be for a similar function but to another car application. Again, thanks to everyone for their contribution. Kind regards, Lionel

IMG_0723.JPG

IMG_0724.JPG

The top picture is that of the bracket for the pitman arm (goes over steering box shaft and pitman arm).  A Part No 1 with a 2F clamp  - which should work just fine (a Part number 1 with a A2 clamp would be used for different leverage - the shaft goes in the forward hole verses the shaft hole on part 1)

 

I am not sure what the bottom picture is - had many NOS lights over years and this is not anything I have seen before (or on anyone's else's car) - That being said though I would best guess via looks tat it is a clamp for the drag link.

 

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If you want a part 205 (the intermediate link) - you can reach out to Don Sommer 

 
Our 1931 Cadillacs had the intermediate link.  Our 1930 Franklin did not have the intermediate link.  The NOS Pilot Rays I have had  never had the intermediate links in the kits (my last original light kit went to the late Bill Bools for J434 - a Duesenberg that had a Packard Dietrich Roadster body grafted to it "The Green Hornet" - though not sure if ever installed).  
Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)
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I want to thanks everyone for your assistance and contribution with my Pilot Ray set up. I am waiting for a couple of Clevis Yolks so that I can set up the linkage rod and all will be done. Thanks all.

 

Lionel

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I hope you don't scramble the "Clevis Yolks".  Good luck with your project.  We would like to see completed pictures.

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Clevis yolkes revueltos. Si , pues. Al gusto. Bueno. Entonces una torta Espanola, por favor.  🍽.    -   El Cadillaquero. 

 

I just couldn't help myself.

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