Grizz

Lift suggestions

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Thank you all! Truly great information. I learned a little. Probably going to stick with the original plan and go with the 2 post challenger. I thought about rotary but at the old shop we had two rotarys and a challenger in the back. I eventually claimed that back bay and moved all my tools over there I liked it so much. The four post sound nice but I like the open access space of the two post. Also my space isn’t real big. 24x40 long. I’m thinking the lift will be in the back of my garage in the middle and have to back the cars in. Another factor was $$. I got enough to get me exactly what I need and not always what I want. Here’s a shot of the garage. I just got the lights on!!! I had to rewire the 240 outlet because the electricians wired it up wrong and it kept tripping the breaker. Next I will epoxy the floor and have lift installed!!! Then I never have to go back inside my house to my loving family again!!!0281AA24-DE0D-4395-80B1-3F407E3DC6B2.thumb.jpeg.0ba2b14b641a036d5a82a1f01f563ab1.jpegFBE6225D-C084-4921-8E7C-94FE937EAE77.thumb.jpeg.b04e9ff71b21ee6f2838312d5f3e337f.jpegC7952EAB-53AF-410E-9939-2789A01B9E96.thumb.jpeg.14b46142dca707cc4050c339f224c098.jpeg

Edited by Grizz (see edit history)

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Your setup is like mine, I have 24x48 but with the cars two deep and the door on one end just like yours,  I put my lift in the space where your Grand Marquis is with the idea that I would have my workbench and toolbox on the side wall and a heater in the corner.  That way my primary workspace would have everything I needed close at hand and I could sort of contain the heat in that area.  You will have an even better setup for a lift with almost unlimited height, enjoy, Todd C

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I wanted to have it back and to one side like you said but the lift guy came and looked at the garage and felt like the middle would be best. Guess I’ll put shelves and tools on either side? I’m gonna call him tomorrow and put in an order probably 

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That means you lose a parking space, bad idea unless there is a very good reason IMO

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47 minutes ago, Grizz said:

I wanted to have it back and to one side like you said but the lift guy came and looked at the garage and felt like the middle would be best.

 

I'm not so sure that the middle would be best per poci 1957's comment above.  I'm sure that the middle would be the easiest from the standpoint of the "lift guy" making the installation.   If you agree, let the "lift guy" know your concerns about losing a parking space.  He may note your concern and make an extra effort to accommodate installation of your lift off to the side, or if he doesn't think it's such a good idea, he'll probably explain his reasoning.  On my lift, I've found it nice to have space to one side for  a work bench and on another side, to have space for specialized tools such as welders, compressors etc.  Of course, on the other hand, you don't want to "crowd the lift by placing it too close to a wall.  I'm sorry if I sound "wishy-washy" here, but there are many things to consider in the placement of a lift.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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Ask yourself several questions. First being, what is the post spacing of the Challeneger lift you are looking at? My Danmar D-10/ACX two post is 12 feet from edge of base plate to edge of base plate. I like to be able to open doors without denting them on the posts! And be able to squeeze between the slightly open door and the car to get in and out of the car. Some lifts are so narrow, you need to exit the car then roll it into position to set the arms.

 

Now, do you plan on doing repair work like removing a rear axle shaft? To do that you need three feet past the rear axle backing plate. So, 3 + 3 + width of car = minimum width of repair stall, or so.

 

Want a workbench beside the lift? Need at least 18" walking space between the post and the workbench.  More is better....😉   Going this route, 2 (workbench) + 1.5 (walk space) + 12 (lift post to post) = minimum 15.5 feet for lift stall. And if you want to walk on the other side of the lift, now 17 feet width of stall!

 

Take a tape measure and masking tape out to the garage and start taping off lift and work areas before you decide where to place stuff. 

 

And you didn't say, but also know how much length you need to access vehicles on the lift. You need to stand in front and back of the vehicle being repaired, usually. like standing in front of a hood, opening a tailgate on a long pick up, etc. 26 feet is a typical length of stall.

 

 

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The lift fella and I took measurements and anything besides the middle is too tight against the wall. I really wanted it to one side to park a car next to it but 24 feet just isn’t enough. Overall width of a challenger LE10  is 131.75 roughly 11ft? Plus as frank said, another 3 ft at least from the wall. 

Edited by Grizz (see edit history)

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i guess this wasted space must be a two post problem because my four post fits in one space just fine.  This is 24ft, with a car on one side and a workbench on the other 

1BC52024-C07D-4BED-BC9B-5EAD25274FDE.jpeg

Edited by poci1957 (see edit history)

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Four post Posts are smaller than two post Posts, as only two carry the load and they need to account for the leverage (vectors) of vehicle weight. So, four post lifts can fit in smaller spaces! Another reason they are sold for extra parking spaces, under 10K capacity, they fit in 10 foot wide stalls.😉

 

24 feet, ID or OD? 24 feet inside between the inside of walls or beams is much more room than 24 feet from outside of wall to outside of wall, the typical garage measurement on plans.

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9 hours ago, Frank DuVal said:

Four post Posts are smaller than two post Posts,.............,. So, four post lifts can fit in smaller spaces! Another reason they are sold for extra parking spaces, under 10K capacity, they fit in 10 foot wide stalls.

 

 

I had not thought about that, yet another plus for the four post in a home garage.  Indeed my 24ft space is actually more like 23.5 inside as frank questioned, Todd C

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Another thing to pay attention to is the under lift clearance.  Early cars are tall, my early 30's cars a 5' 7", some even 5' 8".

I had to buy a longer lift to get enough clearance to park one underneath the lift.   I have nearly 6 feet when all the way up.  Lots of lifts don't have 68 inches underneath.  Measure more than once and buy the right one the first time.

The biggest determining factor for me in getting a 4 post was not having to get up off the floor 8 times, everytime I put a car on the lift.

Edited by Paul Dobbin
added my main reason (see edit history)
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This^^

 

Actually tall vehicles exist in all eras. You just have to be careful about how far you put them up! To avoid walking around all scrunched up under the car, because you couldn't put it up all the way, get a tall enough hoist to do the work you intend to do. Ceiling clearance for taller hoists is another issue.

 

I can certainly relate to not wanting to get down on my knees a lot to set the hoist. I might even pick a 4 poster today.

 

On the other hand, If you intend to do general repair on anything even remotely modern, you want an offset 2-poster. It cannot be overstated how useless a 4 post hoist can be in that situation. You will find yourself working on the ground outside with jackstands because the hoist is in the way. When I was in the trade if someone had shuffled me into a bay with a 4-poster in it, I would have been looking for another job the same day.

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1 hour ago, Bloo said:

On the other hand, If you intend to do general repair on anything even remotely modern, you want an offset 2-poster. It cannot be overstated how useless a 4 post hoist can be in that situation.

 

This doesn't compute for me. General repair, Do you mean body work, or tune ups? What is general repair to you?

I kind of go the other way when it comes to use/useless.

 

Paul is right about the eight trips to the floor. I have trouble getting my fat ass off of the floor anymore. (the reason I got the lift in the first place).

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My main service hoist is a 4 post bendpak and I really like it.   Just drive up, lift up, and start working.  If I have to do a brake job or wheels then it takes a few more minutes.  It's nice to have the runners to set the brake drums and spindles or tools on as I work.  Everything is right there.    

 

They aren't as handy working under the hood though.  Everything is raised 5" so I have to drag a step stool around as I work under the hood.  

 

 

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Ref. side space. You can pull an axle out above the work bench if you don't have cupboards on the wall. So that space does not need to be exclusive?

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2 hours ago, JACK M said:

 

This doesn't compute for me. General repair, Do you mean body work, or tune ups? What is general repair to you?

I kind of go the other way when it comes to use/useless.

 

Paul is right about the eight trips to the floor. I have trouble getting my fat ass off of the floor anymore. (the reason I got the lift in the first place).

 

Well I was a Driveability-Tuneup-Smog guy, so......

 

I would say any sort of underhood work on a front wheel drive car or a v8 powered truck or van with power steering, AC and all that. Engine work, transmissions, clutches, axle shafts, water pumps, alternators, starters, hoses, heads, radiators, belts, timing belts, sensor replacements, etc.

 

Not having the suspension hanging is a huge hindrance. You are reaching around the hoist for almost every bolt. It will keep you completely away from some of them. The tire is also in the way. Yes, you can get pneumatic jacks to lift the frame or suspension (highly recommended if you are going with a 4-post), but then the car is even further away, and the ramp/support structure is right where your torso needs to be to reach many things. I am 6'3", and have long arms. More often than not I can't reach what I want to reach. A shorter person would be even more hobbled.

 

4-post hoists are the right tool for alignment, suspension, and exhaust work. They aren't horrible for oil change (but are way slower than a pit).

 

I am with you about all those trips to the floor. I'm not even sure I could do it anymore on a regular basis. I look under my current jalopy, a 1936 Pontiac, and notice how it and many other prewar cars have almost everything you want to get to arranged right down the center, and I think to myself.. maybe a 4-poster wouldn't be that bad. I could just drive on. No stacking hoist parts to clear the running boards or anything like that. No crawling on the floor. It is tempting.

 

But, to get any work done on more modern vehicles in a reasonable amount of time, offset 2-post is where its at. The old single-post hydraulic hoists weren't too bad either, but they require almost as much crawling around on the floor as a 2-post.

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I too don't get how hard it is to work on cars with a 4 post. Sure you need rolling jacks (2) IMO.

I have done FWD axles, suspension, engines and trans on my 4 poster. Plenty of room between the runways for work unless a cheap import lift.

I have a real nice work pit below my 4 post lift and it is a hassle to work out of compared to the 4 post lift above it... like doing an oil change.

I also have a single post lift I have used for years.... good for wheel and brake work and some trans work.

 

2 post lifts when pulling engines/trans axles... changing the car or truck balance weight when doing so can be very dangerous ..requiring careful placement of support stands

Some classic open cars being lifted on any make 2 post you will see the doors pop or some times coming open!!! I always open the doors on any convertible on any 2 post lift so not to damage door latches or strikers if the frames do flex on a 2 post....

4 post no issues ...

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23 hours ago, Bloo said:

 

 

 

 

Not having the suspension hanging is a huge hindrance. You are reaching around the hoist for almost every bolt. It will keep you completely away from some of them. The tire is also in the way. Yes, you can get pneumatic jacks to lift the frame or suspension (highly recommended if you are going with a 4-post), but then the car is even further away, and the ramp/support structure is right where your torso needs to be to reach many things. I am 6'3", and have long arms. More often than not I can't reach what I want to reach. A shorter person would be even more hobbled.

 

What I do is: #1 Put the car on my four post lift  #2  Put my bottle jack in the sliding jack tray.  #2  Jack it up an lower onto short jack stands (also in the tray)

#4  Set the 4 post ramps to stool height  #5  Sit down and work.

 

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R&R 'ing front coil springs on a 4 post is a snap using rolling jacks..

...raise the front of car off runways with rolling jack..pull tires..(jack positioned rear of front wheels) leaves work area wide open)

...set 8" X 8" block at outer end of lower A-arm..lower car down on blocks

..disconnect lower ball joint or knuckle support lower pin bolt and nut

..loosely safety chain spring to lower control arm for safety

.. raise front end of car till springs are loose ,

....A-arms hanging down .. remove spring/springs.

With two rolling jacks it's even easier.

 

Front Springs C49 Hdtp.JPG

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Kind of ironic, but I just got a phone call from a guy that I know quite well and he is giving up a rented space near me here in Oregon.

He has a two post lift, I would guess about three years old and he is the kind of guy to buy the best.

However he couldn't remember any of the particulars but he did say that he wanted $1500 for it. You move it.

He also said that he is motivated.

It has had very little use and the last time I was there I thought it was new.

If anyone is interested PM me and I will give you his phone number.

If it were a four poster I would probably grab it.

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Hope it's a Mohawk 2 post.

That would be a super steal other wise not so.

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1 hour ago, JACK M said:

He also said that he is motivated.

 

20 minutes ago, c49er said:

Hope it's a Mohawk 2 post.

That would be a super steal other wise not so.

 

Being motivated because he is giving up the place.

Might be that the price would go down as D-day approaches.

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