Steve Fowler

1913 Buick Model 24 Literature / Information

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Hi,

I'm new to the site and I'm looking for help in locating any reference books or parts books for a 1913 Buick Model 24. Any and all help would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Steve  

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I have a pdf with lots of info on your car.  Send me a private message with your email address so I can send it to you...

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I have a reprint of models 24 and 25 owners manual that I don't need. My Buick is model 31. I will send it to you if you tell me where.  Dick Lutey   906 360 7330 eastern

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Hi everyone,

I just want to say thank you to everyone who's offered information on my car. I can be contacted at fowlersc@gmail.com or 678-588-5075. I will try to upload a few pictures when I have a minute. I would like to say thanks in a big way to Mark Shaw for the information he's provided. This information will help get this Buick back on the road where it belongs.

Thanks,

Steve   

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These were taken in 1987 when I was 24 yrs old. We were moving the Buick from the old barn shed in East Point, Ga. where it sat from the early 1950’s. The roof was leaking and my grandfather who’s in one of the pictures, was afraid that items would be stolen from the car as the neighborhood was becoming sketchier every year. The radiator cap and the wheel hub were stolen prior to this move. He was afraid that people could see it down the driveway, so he started pilling things in front of it.  We moved it into his garage behind his house, were it sat until around 1998. It was moved into a trailer and sat on a friend’s farm in Augusta, Ga. until July of 2018, when I brought it to Vermont to be restored. My grandmother, whose father bought the car new in 1913, is seen holding the top up in one of the pictures. She learned to drive in this car around 1931-1932. I’m really excited to complete the restoration and enjoy the car. It has been a dream of mine as long as I can remember. I’m truly grateful for the information you’ve passed on to me and I know it will help me get this Buick back on the road where it belongs. 

1913 Buick 2.jpg

1913 Buick 3.jpg

1913 Buick.jpg

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Steve :

 We are so happy you found us! Your story and photo documentation surely gave everyone a smile.

 We are all willing to assist in your adventure. Please provide more photos as you progress.

Larry DiBarry 

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Steve,

    Here is another good resource for you in Canada.  http://www.29buick.ca/ 

Our good friend Bill lives in Toronto and may know of more Eastern Canada craftsmen to help with your restoration.

 

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Hi Mark,

Thanks, that's great to know. Going over to work on the car Saturday and hope to have some pictures to update the progress. I spoke with Dick Lutey the other night about the owners manuals, and I'm excited to get those copies. I need to get the size and a picture of the hub cover so I can track down a replacement for the one I'm missing. I was wondering about the radiator cap. Do you know if it was plain bakelite with brass underneath or did they come with something like a Motometer? I also need a picture of the layout / routing of the acetylene starter tubes. My car has the switch / distributing block and the special primer cups, but the lines connecting them are missing. I would like to replace them and route them correctly. Any help on placement would be appreciated.     

Thanks,

Steve   

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Most early cars came with plain radiator caps that were later replaced with Motometers.  My Buick also has the acetylene starter with the 1/8" tubing installed, but I don't use it.  The special priming valves with the side inlets are hard to find.

 

13 Buick Acetelyne Starter Piping.JPG

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Motometers were a new product for the 1914 model year. Quickly became popular as factory installed and aftermarket. Yes many were purchased and installed into a drilled original cap which was not designed for one but worked fine.

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