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JamesR

Turn signal light wiring connection question.

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Hi everyone. I'm rewiring my '54 Ford with a Ron Francis 6 volt complete wiring kit. For wiring the turn signal and brake lights, along with the running lights, the instructions say to connect turn signal wire (which will also be brake wiring for rear lights) to the "bright filament" and connect the running light  wire to the "dim filament." Useful info, but not entirely practical. It isn't identifying which filaments are which in the bulb that's the issue, but identifying which contact on the bulb receptacle I need to connect to!! They don't clarify this in the instructions, maybe because it's a universal kit. 

 

I googled and found this explanation for identifying dim vs. bright contacts by using this method, and I want to make sure it's correct before proceeding:

- hold a bulb horizontally, glass to the left

- rotate bulb until locking nib closest to the base is at the bottom

- contact point on bulb nearest you is the for the dim filament

- connect wire to corresponding contact on bulb receptacle.

 

Is this Correct? Thought I'd check with you guys before connecting the wires. The site I got it from looks great, but it's for MG's, so wanted to verify info:

 

https://mgaguru.com/mgtech/electric/et107a.htm

 

Can't wait to connect to start wiring the turn signal switch...that'll be real confusing. :) (I'm going to talk to the Francis company before proceeding with that.) Thanks. - Jim

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Did the car originally have turn signals?

 

There are 2 different ways 6V dual filament bulbs can be. If it had signals, and it has an offset pin as shown, I think you can believe that graphic. If it didn't, then your bulbs will probably not have an offset pin. In that case you just turn the bulb upside down if it is wrong.

 

You could just try a bulb ahead of time. The socket is ground. Try hooking a wire to positive and see what filament lights. It should be obvious which is "bright", but if not, just make note of which one came on. The "bright" one is the thicker heavier filament.

 

A turn signal switch of the sort that uses the brake light filaments also as turn signals works as follows:

 

1) Power connects to flasher. Flasher connects to turn signal switch. Wires exit switch and go to *each* turn signal.

 

2) Power connects to brake light switch. Brake light switch connects to turn signal switch.

 

3) When you turn, the turn signal switch disconnects *one* brakelight from the brakelight switch, and connects it to the flasher.

 

4) When you turn, the turn signal switch connects *one* front turn signal light to the flasher.

 

5) If you have 2 turn indicators on the dash or signal switch (right and left), these connect to the front signals.

 

6) If you have only one turn indicator on the dash or signal switch (the same bulb blinks for right or left), then the bulb connects to the flasher. This is what the third pin is for on a 6 volt flasher.

 

 

 

 

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Thanks Bloo. My car did have turn signals originally, and it does use the staggered locking pin style bulbs (per the MGA site graphic.)

 

Thanks for the explanation on the turn signal switch. That clears up a lot. I was leaving wiring the turn signal switch to the last after I got everything else working.

 

 

Edited by JamesR (see edit history)

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It the pins on the bulb are not offset, the filaments are the same.  The offset pins are there to ensure the bulb is installed only one way.

 

The easy way to figure out which is which is to simply apply power to each terminal on the bulb. One will be brighter than the other.

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Joe,  A 1158 bulb, which is common in 6 volt systems does not have offset pins but does have two different filaments for brake and running lights, so testing should be done when connecting the pigtails to the harness

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Again, my system DOES use the offset pins. The bulb that came in the car - and that I've got several replacements for - is the # 1154.

 

It's a 1954 Ford  pass. car 6 volt that has turn signals from the factory. I guess I can get the battery  to test the filament/ contact relationship. I just thought that question I'm asking might be common knowledge among people who've rewired old early fifties 6 volt cars. (This is my first rewiring job.) Appreciate the input and welcome any other comments.

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53 minutes ago, mike brady said:

Joe,  A 1158 bulb, which is common in 6 volt systems does not have offset pins but does have two different filaments for brake and running lights, so testing should be done when connecting the pigtails to the harness

 

If you can install it either way, there can't be a difference in the filament brightness. Otherwise, how do you ensure the correct filament is connected to the correct circuit?

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2 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

It the pins on the bulb are not offset, the filaments are the same.  The offset pins are there to ensure the bulb is installed only one way.

 

The easy way to figure out which is which is to simply apply power to each terminal on the bulb. One will be brighter than the other.

 

The brighter filament is the brake/directional...

 

Frank

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I just researched 1158 lamp, and it has a BA15d base, which has no offset pins. It is a 2.63 amp bright filament and .75 amp dm filament lamp.

 

So, you use your eyes to see if the dim or bright filament burns with the running lights on!😉

 

The Ford in question does use the offset pin 1154, base BAY15d.

 

On offset pin sockets I always temporarily connect one wire of the double contact socket to the running lights wire and see if the bright or dim filament lights before making permanent connections. I do make sure the ground connection is good first, so I don’t mistake a poor ground on a bright filament for the dim filament.😀

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