Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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This car is going to run like Usain Bolt on prune juice.

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Got out my NOS Blue Streak spark plugs this morning to gap and install in the old girl.  I am told they were good plugs years ago and that a lot of racers used them.  I hope they work well.  I do have a set of AC C77L as backup if these don’t work.

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I actually cranked the motor with the starter today for the first time. Seemed to work fine with no smoke or sparks.  

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I also installed my radiator hoses and the gano filter.  I definitely don’t want to clog up my new radiator core.

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Today I also grounded a spark plug that was attached to a plug wire and had my wife crank the car with the starter.  I had a good strong spark.    Now I am getting excited. The coil looks good.  I believe the old girl is just itching to start!!

It won’t be long.  I need to clean up some electrical work,  finish the vacuum tank and fill the coolant system.  
 

After we finally get some dry warm weather, we’ll give it a try.

 

 

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Mark,

Is Larry DiBarry going to come out and help with the initial start-up?  You gotta be getting on the jazz at this point!

 

Terry 

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I love how you used the original radiator hose clamps. This car is going to be awesome.

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Terry,

I am getting very jazzed!

 

We were hoping the Larry could come and impart some of his expertise.

I found some gas leaks I could not fix on the botttom of the Carb so Ill remove it to check it out.

 

I want to wait for a nice warm day.  Maybe things will change soon and losen up a bit.

 

I cant decide if I should use antifreeze or the waterless stuff. I need to make that decision soon.

 

Ill wait and talk with Larry about thus after I get all these little issues taken care of first.

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Morgan,

 

I had a box of NOS radiator clamps that I used on my 39 Chevy and still had a few left to use here.

Thanks for the compliment.

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Where on the carb. are the leaks?

‚¨áÔłŹThis cute little thing?

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I think its the large nut just forward of that and at the juncture of the line from the vacuum tank.

 

Also seems like I cant titall close the fuel valve under the vacuum tank so I need to fix that too

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I had a few battles there.

That fuel adjustment needle pictured prior: No¬†matter what that bugger would drip fuel. Not a lot, a drip every 40 seconds or so. I had installed replacement ‚Äúpacking felt‚ÄĚ from one of the 2 ‚Äėrebuild kits‚Äô I had purchased (the one and only item that fit the carb.¬†out of either kit). Finally read on here where someone suggested taking a tiny bit of water pump packing wick (graphite infused) and wadding it up in there. It worked.

 

The other part, that ‚Äėbanjo union‚Äô,¬†which is the juncture of the line from the vac-tank... I got a bill for 6 hours (don‚Äôt ask me how - I‚Äôm not a machinist) of machine work on that because some idiot (me) had overtightened it and it ‚Äėcollapsed‚Äô. At least that‚Äôs what he said - imperceptible to my eyes, but after he worked it out it never leaked there again.

 

That carb. was the 1st thing I tackled¬†on the car,¬†and the 1st thing I mucked up. Weeks after that¬†something at work was discovered overtightened - I was quizzed about it and was honestly able to say, ‚ÄúA few weeks ago that could¬†have been me, yes. But I‚Äôve got this old car at home filled with brass parts and it has taught me right out of over tightening irreplaceable parts!‚ÄĚ

FAK. A little humor is necessary for dealing with these tedious little things.

Good luck 

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Posted (edited)

Mark, 

   You are really getting close.  Your engine looks great and I appreciate the updates.   I am going to try to give you some thoughts on waterless coolant or not since I am running Evans waterless in my 1925 Buick, now with around 600 miles on it.  I also had waterless coolant that was factory installed in my 2002 Porsche 911.   I bought this on Amazon so it was delivered to the house.  You need at least 3 gallons, but the deal is buy 4 gal for $168 & free shipping.  You will need a little for ocassional topping up.  I keep the empty jugs in case I need to drain the radiator to service something.   Filter it thru a coffee fiter and pour it back in.   Same on the Porsche when the water pump went out at 45,000 miles.     

Now is really the time to use waterless since the system is dry.  Just pour it in.  If you wanted to make the switch later, you still can, so there is no wrong answer for what to start out on.  If you lost it all on the road and had to use water, you can boil it off later and reuse what is still good.  

One advantage that I see is that one day I drove my car 100 miles.   For an extended time, I was running just over 45 mph.  This is basically tops for the car.  I have an electronic temperature pick up on the head (which I also suggest as they are only $50 and you can flip it under the dash).  Normally on short trips I am reading 200F.  For a long stretch at speed, my reading on the head was steady at 218 degrees F.  It will rise briefly when you come to a stop.  Would I be boiling over with 50/50 mix - possibly or darn close.  I would at some point notice corrosion near the motometer over time, or down where the overflow pipe is.  You know the metal under the radiator and at the base of the shell that has all the rust on it.  I don't worry about any rust forming on my nickel plated shell or the metal between the radiator and the shell.  Ideally a thermostat would open at 165F or 190F and my car would run around 200F, but this is a non pressurized system.  My temp pick up alarm is set for 250F.   No alarm on the motometer.  At less than 250F I may get a little more heightened awareness, but I am not concerned.  

Fact: A coolant mixture of 50% water and 50% ethylene glycol has a boiling point of 223 degrees. A system with a 15 psi cap will add 45 degrees for a final boiling point of 268 degrees. The real purpose of pressurizing is to give drivers a higher operating zone in case of extreme conditions.

I don't know how normal this 218F operating temperature is.  I can still retard my spark and hand crank the car.  Advancing the timing furthur will make the engine run cooler by some amount.  If my honeycomb radiator (which looks clean in and out) is marginal, I have a fix that allows me to keep using it.  Not interested in spending $3,000 to recore it with another honeycomb.  This may all be completely normal anyway in Texas. 

I am not sure how well the thermometer that sits on the top of the radiator really works.  I can't see it at night.   The Evans won't boil so I do not know how well it would pick up a real hot engine.  The thermometer seems to be working with the Evans, but the bulb is up in the vapor space and not in contact with the liquid.  Maybe I should solder a little wire on it so it actually touches the fluid?  At 218 the motometer showed an elevated temperature from normal, but not up in the danger circle that I recall.  Not a lot of data on this as few have a temperature indicator.      

I do fill my radiator maybe 1/4" above the tubes.  If I ever see dry tubes I add fluid.  I leave space for thermal expansion and I don't want to push any out the overflow. 

 

Hugh

 

 

 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)

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From my experience, I have been using and recommend using regular antifreeze. 

 

A couple of reasons why.  First is that the cars were designed and ran on water only and worked fine for years. "Antifreeze" at the time consisted of alcohol.  As long as the block is clean and the radiator is in good condition you should not have a problem. 

 

I have only used antifreeze in my '15 truck and other vehicles and it has never overheated since I installed a new radiator 6 or 7 years ago. There is a large discussion here on the forum on which type of antifreeze to use on the old cars.  The old green Zerex, or the more modern antifreezes.  I use the regular Prestone yellow ethelyne glycol in my old vehicles.  So far, I have not had any problems nor would I expect to see any.   IMO and experience.

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Mark,

I run the Zerex 'Original Formula' antifreeze in my Buicks.  Antifreeze will result in a slightly lower operating temperature, it has anti-foamant properties, it acts as a water pump lubricant, and has anti-corrosion inhibitors.  The fact that these old engines utilize a non-pressurized cooling system probably has some considerations also.  This is my story and I'm gonna have to stick to it.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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Hugh and Larry,

 

Thank you for the information.

 

Hugh, can you tell me where you purchased your temp sensor?  I am interested in getting one.

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10 minutes ago, Mark Kikta said:

Hugh and Larry,

 

Thank you for the information.

 

Hugh, can you tell me where you purchased your temp sensor?  I am interested in getting one.

 

I have a moto-meter on my truck that works.

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Looks great Mark, a mirror imagine of my 23-6-48, did you put a filter in your top return (that's why the two radiator hoses) and just a suggestion - what ever you use in your radiator I would open the water pump pet cock to ensure no air is left in the pump thus causing a cavitation - cant wait for warm weather up here in upstate NY

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Posted (edited)

Mark, 

    This is the temperature unit that I installed in my Buick, and the bracket that allows it to flip under the dash.  I bought it on Ebay.  I have it powered from the running light position on the light switch.  Also, on the Gano filter, I just pushed mine into the upper hose.  It did not  seem like it would move anywhere and so it is invisible and I have 2 less places for antifreeze to leak out.     Hugh  

 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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I use water and 1 gallon of denatured alcohol, for some reason ethylene glycol antifreeze foams like crazy in my car, the alcohol mix doesn't foam at all.

 

Bottle of Mac's 1300 anti-rust / water pump lube is good.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Morgan Wright said:

I use water and 1 gallon of denatured alcohol, for some reason ethylene glycol antifreeze foams like crazy in my car, the alcohol mix doesn't foam at all.

 

Bottle of Mac's 1300 anti-rust / water pump lube is good.

 

Could be sucking air at the waterpump.  Using alcohol instead of ethylene glycol is fixing the symptom, not the problem.

Edited by Larry Schramm (see edit history)

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OK I will fix the packing this year. I've been running the car on 100-year-old packing all this time.

 

Thanks

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