Mark Kikta

1922 engine progress

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I'm going to try to turn it in my lathe to get the underside flat

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Benefits of AACA Membership.

Tonight I took Terry Wiegand’s recommendation and turned this deformed brass fitting for my vacuum tank on my lathe and it came out great.  I should have much better luck getting it to not leak now.

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What you don't understand is that fitting would never leak gasoline. It's a vacuum system, not a pump system. The top of the vacuum tank where that fitting is makes a vacuum, and if there is a leak there, it would suck air in, not gasoline out. The person who put all that torque on the nut to stop a leak just kept on tightening it hoping to stop the vacuum leak, to make the vacuum tank work. The actual vacuum leak could have been many other places, most likely the lid itself. That's why I use RUBBER gaskets between the upper lid and vacuum tank, and between the vacuum tank and lower tank body. That's probably where the vacuum leak is, not that nut. Cork gaskets are baloney, use rubber. I used the 1/16 inch thickness red rubber gasket material at any ACE Hardware store.

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The problem with using rubber gaskets on an application like this is the location of the tank.  It is very close to the exhaust manifold and subjected to repeated heating and cooling.  The rubber would last for a while and then start to break down.  In my humble opinion, the best thing to use would be a copper crush gasket.  Morgan is correct - it is a vacuum leak issue and not a fuel loss thing.  Look at all vacuum connections real close because that is where trouble can start very quick.

 

Terry Wiegand

South Hutchinson, Kansas

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I see that.  Well, cleaning this up will give me a better vacuum seal also which is a god thing.

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This is where I made the 2 rubber gaskets. The originals were cork. One between the lid and lip of the upper tank, and one between the lips of the upper and lower tanks.

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If fuel with ethanol gets near those rubber gaskets, you can kiss them goodby.

There are kits with correct gasket material availablr - dont reinvent the wheel plus, you'll save yourself a lot of greif.

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Mark - take it from one who did this - me - make sure that nipple lines up with the top of the pump, if it is not installed properly then you will only burn the gas in the canister, there wont be any suction - I too used cork gaskets with a little bit of sealer

 

Jim

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6 hours ago, DonMicheletti said:

If fuel with ethanol gets near those rubber gaskets, you can kiss them goodby.

There are kits with correct gasket material availablr - dont reinvent the wheel plus, you'll save yourself a lot of greif.

 

I use non-ethanol. The "correct" gasket material was cork which I declined to use.

 

Vacuum tanks are famous for being unreliable. I am guessing a major part of their unreliableness has to do with vacuum loss, and a major point of vacuum loss is probably that big rim where the lid joins. So many people have given up on vacuum tanks and added fuel pumps I can see there has been a huge problem with them. I can't add a fuel pump, as my car is a POF (preservation of original features) car. So far, my vacuum tanks works fine, if there is a problem down the road I'll try a different material.

 

I can't imagine that cork is the best material for preventing air leaks in that lid. Every air fitting I've ever seen, from tires to basketballs to car windows, used rubber so that's what I tried. Maybe there is something better, like neoprene or something.

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Morgan, you are lucky. No non-ethanol around here.  And the ethanol stuff is a PITA

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The map didn’t photograph well, but there’s a website devoted to listing gas stations where non-ethanol gas is sold:

https://www.pure-gas.org/index.jsp

 Simply click on your state or providence listed in the bottom box of the page. Then select your city.

 

In Michigan it’s sold as ‘recreational gas’ (rec gas). They won’t allow it to be pumped into a car - red cans only. It’s also $4+ per gallon. I use it. Major pain, most old car folks I know don’t even bother with it, but it is available throughout most of the US.

(Now I need to find a good old can. These new mandated ‘safety cans’ — woof. 5 gallons of fuel weighs 30lbs. Difficult enough to keep that mid-air holding it between the space of the spare tire and the tank - but with these ‘safety cans’ it also takes all the strength of one hand and thumb to keep the dispense tab pressed open. Genuine torture device.) 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, DonMicheletti said:

Morgan, you are lucky. No non-ethanol around here.  And the ethanol stuff is a PITA

 

We have this awesome chain over here called Stewarts. They started off as a dairy and ice cream but developed into convenience stores with gas and everything. Totally awesome chain, there are hundreds of Stewarts in NE New York, and EVERY ONE has non ethanol for the 91 octane (the other octanes have ethanol)

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My radiator shop technician glass beaded my tank for me and said that the inside parts had been plated with something originally. Then  I read that the inside parts were originally nickel plated, so I decided to give a try at re-plating the float so it wouldn’t corrode.  It worked pretty well.  Not perfect but it’s bound to help some.

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On 12/30/2019 at 8:29 PM, Mark Kikta said:

Today I replaced the padding material needed on the top brackets and bottom straps for mounting my newly reworked gas tank. I attached the material to the top bracket with a split rivet as it was originally attached.  After putting the top brackets and insulating material in place, I jacked the tank up into position and installed the lower straps and insulating material.   I tightened the lower straps and the tank is in place.

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hi mark where did you bought your new tank ? I need one for my k49 project. Do you know where I can buy All the gazoline gauge too ?

 

thank you very much, anthony

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Anthony,

 

This is the tank off this car that I had cleaned and sealed inside.  It was like like someone had replaced it many years ago and not used much according to the guys at the radiator repair shop that did the work.  I know it had not been used since the late 50s.

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Oh you asked about the gas gage.....mine works fine but I need to make/get a new face for it.

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On 2/2/2020 at 7:55 AM, Mark Kikta said:

Oh you asked about the gas gage.....mine works fine but I need to make/get a new face for it.


Hello  Mark!

 

i too am working on the face/dial on our 27/27, I had some templates made up for the gauge and it’s my first practice run on a paint can lid.  
 

The route that I am going seems to be a bit different than most folks, I am acid etching the original face of the gauge with new markings.  This process will allow the paint/coating to sit inside the etched area and shouldn’t flake or wear off.  That’s my thought process anyway!

 

Here is my first practice run on paint can lid:

 

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Wow that looks great!

 

What process did you use to etch that piece of metal?

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On 2/9/2020 at 8:35 AM, Mark Kikta said:

Wow that looks great!

 

What process did you use to etch that piece of metal?


 

 

Edited by Crazyfamily (see edit history)

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Tonight I finished making my battery cables.  I grounded the battery to the frame as original and also to the transmission.  Added an electrical cutoff switch in the positive line to the starter. 

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Now that I have finished with the rear axle, differential and rear wheels, I’m back working on the engine. I used my little whistle on each cylinder to find top dead center so I could get all of my valves adjusted properly at .010.

Then I retarded the spark lever and set the engine at 7deg retarded.  I installed points and set them as the book calls for at the number one spark plug terminal on my new distributor cap. I set the points at .025 as the book calls for. Next on to plugs ad plug wires.

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Well today was another exciting day and a milestone in my effort to get the old girl running again.  I completed the wiring and combination switch installation.  Then for the first time in over 60 years, I put power to the system. I Watched but no smoke was present anywhere.   When I turned the switch on,  the starter I rebuilt began clicking and motoring.  How exciting!  Then I pushed the horn button and the horn fired up as well.

 

One step at a time we are making a little progress. Next on to plug wiring and gapping the plugs.  Then on to checking out the vacuum tank and hooking up the radiator.

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