m-mman

V-8 with horizontal valves?

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In a wrecking yard in Kansas. 

V-8 with horizontal valves(?)  Downdraft carb 

Any ideas?

engine 1.jpg

engine 2.jpg

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To clarify the above:  1930/31 Oakland, or 1932 Pontiac.  (All same.)  Engine number is on left side of block.  1930 engine numbers start with 27, 1931 starts with 29, and 1932 Pontiac starts with 31.

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Excellent.  I have heard of these but never seen one up close.

The horizontal valves made me think of an Auburn 12. 

 

As I remember they had a balance/vibration problem(?) Something about the V-angle they used and that there was a 'push rod' that shoved against the frame/mounts to counter this. Low survival I would assume. 

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I would have to look up which is which but the connection from the frame to the balance shaft is on the opposite side depending whether it is an Oakland or a Pontiac.

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Pretty rare motor, I think. Someone needs to snag it.

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Is that a second one behind it in the top photo...in the upper right corner? Looks like same head lying there. Finding two of them would increase the odds of having enough usable parts to make at least one good engine. Cool find! 

 

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I can see a potential [problem with these engines. Having the two surfaces at an angle on each head would it be impossible to surface grind one or the other and get a match up?

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The "synchronizer" is on the right on Oakland engines and on the left for Pontiac. The engine in the picture is therefore an Oakland engine as is obvious in the first picture right front corner.. Even replacing a head gasket would be difficult with the angle.

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A story relating to the V8 Oakland engine. The main reason for the vibration issue was the fact that the engine had a flat crankshaft. Modern Ferrari V8s, among others, have flat cranks but I guess they operate at higher rpms and it isn't a problem.

 

https://www.pontiacoaklandmuseum.org/sites/default/files/storypdf/The-Oakland-V-Eight.pdf

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A major significant feature of these Oakland V8's is they are a mono-block two years before the Ford flathead V8 came to market.  The concurrent Viking V8 companion car to Oldsmobile is also a mono-block before Ford as well. 

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On 1/20/2019 at 12:43 PM, 58L-Y8 said:

A major significant feature of these Oakland V8's is they are a mono-block two years before the Ford flathead V8 came to market.  The concurrent Viking V8 companion car to Oldsmobile is also a mono-block before Ford as well. 

 

Hummmmmm. . . . never thought of that. That's neat,  

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Oakland was on the right track with their mono-block design, the single plane crankshaft was the downfall, that and angled block decks that required cylinder heads of the same design.

 

Eventually, GM did benefit from this early technological development when Cadillac introduced their first mono-block V8 for 1936.  Interesting enough, the 1932-'39 Packard Twelve is also a mono-block, which Packard also instituted for the 120 but didn't bother to do so for the Super Eights until the 356 ci of 1940.  They were the last to use this outdated method of engine design through 1939.

 

Steve 

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