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zipdang

My "new" lathe - Input?

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Posted (edited)

My 13" SB lathe was built in 1921. 

Since this photo was taken, I have replaced the tailstock and installed a quick change tool holder.

 

IMG_20181215_093730842.jpg

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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Posted (edited)

And a 1950's era drill press from Sears...............Bob

Edited by Bhigdog (see edit history)

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Lets not forget the low end Sears models, the Atlas lathes.  I've been using this 1936 model for over forty years, even under the clutter

Atlas 10x24.jpg

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6 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

And a 1950's era drill press from Sears...............Bob

Yes, but we're talking South Bend lathes here...

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32 minutes ago, Mark Shaw said:

Yes, but we're talking South Bend lathes here...

 

Seems to me a widening discussion of vintage tooling and machines in our vintage AUTO shops, even though started by SB lathes, is a normal progression of subject that would be of interest to many if not most folks here and would certainly not detract from the subject of lathes in general or SB's in particular. .........Bob

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As long as the tangents that arise deal with the same subject, I'm all for it. As the one who started this thread, I've enjoyed learning about other aspects as well as picking up the tips on where to get more information. Thanks to all for contributing. My next task will be to get some idea of what this might be worth. Letting ebay bidders decide seems to be the easiest method since I'm not looking to get rich.

 

Installed the belt today and with some fiddling to get everything lined up and tensioned, I was off to the races. Runs as good as it looks (in my biased opinion). Pictures soon - I promise.

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And some pictures (with my high class screen hiding mess in my shop).

P1010893.thumb.jpg.60bafc1913b25b222ec48751291c06ec.jpgP1010892.thumb.jpg.6b2e6617512352f595b29fd2c5390925.jpgP1010902.thumb.jpg.53692950537146e62bb46303f8d8b3af.jpg

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2 hours ago, Bush Mechanic said:

Wow! that came up nicely. 

That's one nice looking lathe.  You did a great job. I hope you're planning on keeping it.  

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18 hours ago, BuicksBuicks said:

Lets not forget the low end Sears models, the Atlas lathes.  I've been using this 1936 model for over forty years, even under the clutter

Atlas 10x24.jpg

 

  Makes me feel so good!:P

 

  Ben

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Thanks for all the replies! It was the perfect project to get me closer to warm weather and garage time. Realistically I don't see myself learning to use it, so I'm hoping when I'm done admiring it and have received some information from South Bend Lathe Co. I will  find it a new home.

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I received the information from the South Bend Lathe Co. Here it is:

 

LatheCard.thumb.jpg.f6d04d93346c5b371da117cb9f6c24e2.jpg

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Posted (edited)
On 4/3/2019 at 6:43 PM, Mark Shaw said:

Yes, but we're talking South Bend lathes here...

 

Mark, I remember reading that South Bend made the Atlas Lathes that sears sold, sort of how the Kenmore Washers and Dryers were made by Whirlpool. 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)

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9 hours ago, John348 said:

Mark, I remember reading that South Bend made the Atlas Lathes that sears sold

Nope.   

Atlas lathes were first manufactured by the Atlas Press Company in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1932. In 1934, Atlas Press began selling its 10-inch lathes. For over 50 years, the company produced lathes of different sizes, as well as the Utility and Unit Plan model products. The Atlas Press Company was notable for using new materials in manufacturing; these included the trademarked ZAMAK alloy, which was composed of zinc, aluminum, magnesium and copper.

The first lathes produced by the Atlas Press Company were 9-inch models branded as Craftsman "Metalmasters" or "Metalcraft." These were manufactured from 1932 to 1936, when they began competing with the company's simple 10-inch "Utility" lathes. Instead of a backgear, the first Atlas lathes utilized a V-belt system and a Hyatt roller-bearing countershaft unit. The patent for these lathes was granted in 1933.

In 1936, the company began producing its Series 10D and 10F lathes, which were stronger and more effective than earlier models. The company designed these lathes with a modern backgear, which was a departure from the V-belt design. The 6-inch lathes also came into production in 1936 and were manufactured until 1974. This popular lathe sold well in the United States due to its affordability and all-purpose design. Atlas Press primarily offered these lathes through the Sears, Roebuck catalog.

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Posted (edited)

Hey Mark,

Thanks a lot for the info and clearing that up for me . Great learning and reading, 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)

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