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My "new" lathe - Input?


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My sons found me a old South Bend and I found if you contact them and give them the number from the table the will send you the information of who purchased it new and when. Mine was purchased in 1928 by someone in Brooklyn NY

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  • 2 months later...

As I've been cleaning this lathe up, I found this "tool" in the drawer of parts. Any idea what it's supposed to hold or do? Is it homemade for something? It's been a great project to bring this lathe back to life - besides being a great indoor project. All the gears, screws, surfaces are in wonderful condition. All the oil and dirt protected them. I will soon post pictures of it done and then decide how to go about selling it. I'm sure there's someone who will get more use out of this than I would ever have.

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The only part I needed was one of the gibs. Hope I'm getting that term right. Found one with the screws on eBay and noticed that many of the parts for this lathe are available there also. The two descriptive/advertising booklets and the complete parts book that were in the drawer have been quite valuable to this novice. I was also able to download the 1935 edition of how to run a lathe from the South Bend company. Earlier, John348 suggested contacting the company for information based on my serial number. They responded that they do have that information back to 1929 although it may only be a line or two. They also wanted $25 for that line or two.

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What a great find.

And the price was right, too!

A lathe is one of the tools I want to add to my garage at some point along with a plasma cutter.

Please keep us updated on your progress as you clean it up.

 

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As to that home-made tool, my best guess is a 'spanner' to fit on the jaws of a chuck to unscrew it from the head-stock. I use a 1" square length of hardwood between the jaws, then spin the lathe rapidly by hand. When the wood strikes the bed, it unscrews the chuck. There is probably a 'correct' method, but that one works for me. And I can recommend a board to sit across the ways, under the chuck, for that occasion when the pesky thing slips out of your hands. I'd rather damage a board than the ways.

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The belt I ordered came in today so I'm hoping to have it running in the next couple of days followed by some pictures. I think it looks so good it should be displayed on the dining room buffet, but my wife thinks otherwise.😉

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DoAll is actually the name of a machine tool company. They,re best known for their line of band saws. Variable speed with an almost infinate variety of blades lets it cut almost any material from sponge rubber to steel as hard as a file. Hence the DoAll moniker.....bob

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32 minutes ago, Mark Shaw said:

Yes, but we're talking South Bend lathes here...

 

Seems to me a widening discussion of vintage tooling and machines in our vintage AUTO shops, even though started by SB lathes, is a normal progression of subject that would be of interest to many if not most folks here and would certainly not detract from the subject of lathes in general or SB's in particular. .........Bob

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As long as the tangents that arise deal with the same subject, I'm all for it. As the one who started this thread, I've enjoyed learning about other aspects as well as picking up the tips on where to get more information. Thanks to all for contributing. My next task will be to get some idea of what this might be worth. Letting ebay bidders decide seems to be the easiest method since I'm not looking to get rich.

 

Installed the belt today and with some fiddling to get everything lined up and tensioned, I was off to the races. Runs as good as it looks (in my biased opinion). Pictures soon - I promise.

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Thanks for all the replies! It was the perfect project to get me closer to warm weather and garage time. Realistically I don't see myself learning to use it, so I'm hoping when I'm done admiring it and have received some information from South Bend Lathe Co. I will  find it a new home.

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On 4/3/2019 at 6:43 PM, Mark Shaw said:

Yes, but we're talking South Bend lathes here...

 

Mark, I remember reading that South Bend made the Atlas Lathes that sears sold, sort of how the Kenmore Washers and Dryers were made by Whirlpool. 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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9 hours ago, John348 said:

Mark, I remember reading that South Bend made the Atlas Lathes that sears sold

Nope.   

Atlas lathes were first manufactured by the Atlas Press Company in Kalamazoo, Michigan in 1932. In 1934, Atlas Press began selling its 10-inch lathes. For over 50 years, the company produced lathes of different sizes, as well as the Utility and Unit Plan model products. The Atlas Press Company was notable for using new materials in manufacturing; these included the trademarked ZAMAK alloy, which was composed of zinc, aluminum, magnesium and copper.

The first lathes produced by the Atlas Press Company were 9-inch models branded as Craftsman "Metalmasters" or "Metalcraft." These were manufactured from 1932 to 1936, when they began competing with the company's simple 10-inch "Utility" lathes. Instead of a backgear, the first Atlas lathes utilized a V-belt system and a Hyatt roller-bearing countershaft unit. The patent for these lathes was granted in 1933.

In 1936, the company began producing its Series 10D and 10F lathes, which were stronger and more effective than earlier models. The company designed these lathes with a modern backgear, which was a departure from the V-belt design. The 6-inch lathes also came into production in 1936 and were manufactured until 1974. This popular lathe sold well in the United States due to its affordability and all-purpose design. Atlas Press primarily offered these lathes through the Sears, Roebuck catalog.

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