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zipdang

My "new" lathe - Input?

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My own Logan lathe was given to me and was also found in a garage by a friend hired to do a clean up. It was in cleaner shape than yours and has a quick change but runs the exact same drive system with a motor pulley to jackshaft pulley to flat leather belt. I’ve been loving it ever since I got it. Picked a nice Alliant vertical mill with all the essentand a ton of tooling for $1,750 including a 5hp phase converter. They can be found out there for the right kind of money. 

 

In that box along with those feed screw gears are some guards for the belt drives. I see a face plate and other things in that box. It’s a goldmine of parts.

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Congrats on your 'new' lathe!  A lathe is essential for working on vintage cars...and vintage anything!

 

My first lathe (1938 Sheldon 11") looked much worse than yours, so don't fret.   

I just recently started my second lathe (1948 South Bend 9"), but it will be kept as 'original' as possible...just like my cars. 

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That is a great find. I want to warn you, a lathe is possibly the most dangerous piece of equipment in a machine shop. Not trying to scare you, but instead make you aware it is very easy to get injured if inexperienced in operating one. If you choose to restore and use it, I would recommend enrolling in a beginning machinest course at a community college. Not only will you be safer, but will learn to do things on your lathe that would be difficult to discover on you own. I can tell you that lathes are a very neat piece of equipment and are fun to operate.

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What mike said. Also, when running a lathe, no ties, scarfs,  loose shirt cuffs, long hair, gloves and NO rings. I might opine that the piece of equipment in the shop most likely to hurt one is the buffing wheel...............Bob

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I still have a proud scar on my left thumb from a "lathe lesson" learned in Jr. High school metal shop. Agree about the buff'.  -  CC 

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This is my  11" X 36" South Bend lathe...  I am still looking for the correct tailstock for 8" wide V ways and 11" swing.

 

 

SB Lathe 1.jpg

SB Lathe 2.jpg

Edited by Mark Shaw (see edit history)

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Hey C Carl, we have a "matched set". We were learning to shape copper bowls in H. S. metal shop and with the lathe still spinning after I shut it off, I though I could slow it down with my hand. Well I couldn't and it gave me about 15 stitches and a 2" scar to remind me not to try it again. Do kids even have metal shop anymore?

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I was wondering the same thing as I tapped out (I also should have taken typing with the girls - who knew ?), my bloody experience. From what I gather, now EVERYONE learns to type very well, but don't learn one end of a screwdriver from the other end of a wrench.   -  Carl 

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The best trick for cleaning the ways is to use a dull carbide scraper... it just pushes the rust off.

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When I was in training to be a machinist the first class we had, before ever going into the machine shop, was safety training.  The instructor was an old machinist with about 30 years experience. We were in a classroom but he was wearing his safety glasses. He asked the rest of us to put on a pair. Then he took his glasses off and held them up in his left hand. He told us, "This is the most important piece of safety equipment you will ever have. Companies will hire a machinist with fingers or toes missing but they won't hire a blind machinist". Then he held up his right hand to show he had a finger missing to prove his point.  After some discussion about safety glasses he held up a chuck key for a lathe. It's a simple, harmless looking tool that is essential to using a lathe.   He said, "This may be be the most dangerous tool you will use in a machine shop. If you turn the lathe on with it still in the chuck you may be badly hurt or killed". This is some good advice for someone using a lathe for the first time.

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When I worked in the tool room leaving the chuck key in on a lathe or drill press was a mandatory  day off without pay. When I started my dad told me to never trust a machine. It will sit doing it's job day after day for years and years, and the whole time it is just patiently watching and waiting for someone to get careless. .............Bob

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Dalton made lathes very similar to the South Bend. My Nine by Four Dalton has been a really nice piece of equipment that I've use many times making parts for restoration projects.  This one had some surface rust when I got it but cleaned up nicely - WD40, steel wool and plenty of elbow grease (and time), but was a fun project in itself.

 

20180205_201915.jpg

 

Here is a pre and post restoration of a lathe in a condition similar to yours

image2(22).jpeg

image1.jpeg

Edited by Stude Light (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, Stude Light said:

Dalton made lathes very similar to the South Bend. My Nine by Four Dalton has been a really nice piece of equipment that I've use many times making parts for restoration projects.  This one had some surface rust when I got it but cleaned up nicely - WD40, steel wool and plenty of elbow grease (and time), but was a fun project in itself.

 

 

 

Here is a pre and post restoration of a lathe in a condition similar to yours

 

 

I have a Dalton Combination Machine. A big old beast. I recently moved it from SoCal to Central Texas. Loaded and unloaded it by myself. Would have been tough at 40. A lot tougher at 71. It's in the shop and I have all my fingers and toes and a functioning spine

Edited by CarlLaFong (see edit history)

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Thank you all for the input - especially for the tool-specific safety items. I've done a fair amount of woodworking and still have all my appendages - scarred maybe, but still present. The tips on cleaing this up are also very helpful. Since I'm planning on taking a welding course in the future, it would be easy to see what's out there for the machine work. I'm sure I'll have more questions when I get started on the project when the weather warms!

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My sons found me a old South Bend and I found if you contact them and give them the number from the table the will send you the information of who purchased it new and when. Mine was purchased in 1928 by someone in Brooklyn NY

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