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Restorer32

Trying to identify Schebler carb

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Latest Patent date is 1907. This is a big heavy bronze carb. Only marking is LX334 stamped  (rather than cast) into the air inlet bowl. Where is CarbKing when we need him? Not for sale.  Hoping to use it on a very obscure car if appropriate. Patent dating is perfect.

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I have three of them, and they make very nice brass display items.

Most Schebler carbs have been replaced by owners who actually drive their cars, in order to make their engines both idle and run at speed. 

Schebler carbs are mostly known to do either, but not both.  

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Seeing as how we are hoping to use this on a 1 cylinder 3 litre engine with a bore of 5 1/8" and a stroke of 10" I doubt it would idle smoothly no matter what carb was used.

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Carbking cannot help.

 

I have yet to find a Schebler book which covers the model L in detail. Same is true for the models D and R.

 

There are very few references by carburetor number in some of the early Schebler books, but no parts break-down.

 

I have no listing for the LX-334. This should be read as model L, assembly number 334.

 

The Schebler model L was used at least as early as 1908, and at least as late as 1914.

 

I have shamelessly begged on these forums for those with early original equipment master parts books to send information on these three models of Schebler, but so far, no love.

 

Hope you enjoy adjusting the "clocks" on the model L.

 

Jon.

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3 hours ago, Mark Shaw said:

I have three of them, and they make very nice brass display items.

Most Schebler carbs have been replaced by owners who actually drive their cars, in order to make their engines both idle and run at speed. 

Schebler carbs are mostly known to do either, but not both.  

 

With all deference to Mark, the Schebler carb on our former 1912 Oakland Model 30 Touring must have been that oddity, rare in that the 201ci 4-cylinder engine idled extremely smoothly, even down to an (estimated by sound and feel)  300-350 rpm, and was also quite peppy, both on partial, and on full-on acceleration through the gears.

 

It was quite a real learning experience the first time I "Field-Stripped" it twice on our very first tour with this car, the 1997 AAA Revival Glidden Tour in Thomasville, Georgia. I mistakenly blamed the carb during the last fifteen miles of the very long first day of the tour, and the first real extended drive of the newly aquired car just two weeks earlier. The car had driven well with four passengers and a full complement of tools through the day, but now, nearly back to the Thomas County Fairgrounds, it was driving well only down the little hills and cutting out on the uphill portions. A quick examination showed that there was still more than a quarter full fuel tank. Believing the carb to be at fault, I spread out a clean white towel on the grass alongside the road and completely stripped the Schebler down to all of its internal parts. Everything was cleaned, inspected, and reassembled, yielding the same negative results as prior. A second attempt yielded no improvement. Just prior to phoning for the Vulture Wagon, Betty, and the late Bob Thurstone happened by in their 1930 Packard 733 convertible coupe. Bob added a gallon of gas to the tank located under the driver's seat of the Oakland, and gravity feed supplied adequate fuel to the Schebler, getting us back to base camp. Ensuing measurements showed that someone had enlarged the tank by adding several inches of depth to it. Unfortunately, what this did was to lower the base of the tank below the height of the carburetor. Gravity, being what it is, will not typically raise the fluid in this manner, so when driving downhill, the fuel level was above the carb, but uphill the carb was starving. Adding a gallon was just enough to get us back. For future use we never let the fuel get that low, and eventually added an in-tank electric pump as an assist, driven off the hidden 12-Volt battery which also powered to Halogen headlight bulbs hidden within the original Presto-light fed burners.

 

Fieldstripping the Schebler gave me an appreciation for the 1912 technology, as well as for modern advancements such as "Quadrajet" and multi-port fuel injection.

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I have to agree with Marty on this. I also have a 1912 Oakland only mine is the model 40 touring. I've always (33years now!) run the model L carb as that is what it came with from the factory. It runs great! Idles beautifully, lots of power pulling and it goes as fast as I'm comfortable with. In addition my Oakland is the easiest hand cranked car to start I've seen. I've got over 20000 miles touring this car over the years and the last thing I'd ever change is my Schebler carb!!

Ken

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Glad to read that some have had success with their Scheblers. 

 

I have only repeated what the great Harold Sharon said (he reconfigured the venturi in his Buick's Schebler), and my touring buddies who have replaced theirs with Zenith, Carter BB1, and others... 

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Harold Sharon was an amazing man. Enjoyed his Do it Yourself seminars at the annual meetings for a number of years.

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On 1/15/2019 at 10:03 AM, Mark Shaw said:

I have three of them, and they make very nice brass display items.

Most Schebler carbs have been replaced by owners who actually drive their cars, in order to make their engines both idle and run at speed. 

Schebler carbs are mostly known to do either, but not both.  

 

I thought this Marvel Schebler Aircraft Carburetor might be of interest.

It is displayed at the Wedell-Williams Louisiana Air Museum in Patterson where we drove our '37-80C.

Hopefully it proved to be somewhat reliable, as the pilot might not have had the opportunity to jus "pull-over to the side"

Marvel Schebler Aircraft Carburetor.jpg

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Marty,

    I am running a Marvel-Schebler in my 15 Speedster.  This later version seems to work OK in the shop, but I have yet to get this car finished and on the road.

Stay tuned...

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