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dr. james

Acura tl 2006 repair estimate

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The practice is called "upselling" and if a service tech/writer/manager is paid commission, expect it. It's where they make their money.

 

I had what was supposedly a reputable GoodYear service store try to sell me new upper ball joints and control arm bushings on a 73 Olds convertible I owned some 20 years ago. He was going by car's age, claiming the front end couldn't be aligned until those items were replaced. What he didn't count on was that I had rebuilt the entire front end less than a year before. I got that FEA plus an oil change free in return for keeping quiet. I didn't of course... and didn't go back there for anything else either.

 

And for some reason the local Ford store is always trying to sell me a new oil pan drain plug for me 02 Grand Marquis... "Didn't you just put one in last oil change?" I guess that one's old enough to start using the IRS the 93 F150 and the Gray Ghost wagon go to.

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6 hours ago, rocketraider said:

The practice is called "upselling" and if a service tech/writer/manager is paid commission, expect it. It's where they make their money.

 

In my mind, that practice is called dishonesty.

 

Honest "upselling" is when a customer comes in

for a Chevrolet Citation, and while honoring his wishes,

you point out the benefits of certain options, or how

the Chevrolet Malibu might better fit his family.

Then, leave the decision to him entirely without pressure.

 

Honesty is rewarded in the long term.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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I have found some dealership service counters are an extension of the new car sales dept. What better way to sell a new car is there than telling the customer his car needs thousands of dollars in repairs? Suddenly that new car seems much more necessary.

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Might look here. One of the things mentioned is to adjust the vales when you can hear them.

 

Are only a few mechs I trust so do almost all of my own work. Just took a lot of static for using BMW wheels on a GM car (I liked them).

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I always have my car serviced at the dealer because their work is so impressive, and it's such a great deal.  - Said no one ever.

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On 1/13/2019 at 3:45 PM, rocketraider said:

The practice is called "upselling" and if a service tech/writer/manager is paid commission, expect it. It's where they make their money.

 

I had what was supposedly a reputable GoodYear service store try to sell me new upper ball joints and control arm bushings on a 73 Olds convertible I owned some 20 years ago. He was going by car's age, claiming the front end couldn't be aligned until those items were replaced. What he didn't count on was that I had rebuilt the entire front end less than a year before. I got that FEA plus an oil change free in return for keeping quiet. I didn't of course... and didn't go back there for anything else either.

 

And for some reason the local Ford store is always trying to sell me a new oil pan drain plug for me 02 Grand Marquis... "Didn't you just put one in last oil change?" I guess that one's old enough to start using the IRS the 93 F150 and the Gray Ghost wagon go to.

lol, getting an alignment at a tire shop? what could possibly go wrong?

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DR James. The one guide you need to look at is in the Owners Manual under service intervals.  This will give you a list of recommended service intervals. I have and maintain a 2004 Accord and all you need to follow is the service intervals. Honda engines stopped needing valve adjustments  in the early 2000's for most engines. Not sure if Acura is the same.

The owners manual will show valve adjustments if listed in the service intervals section if it needs it. If automatic trans you may need some service. My 2004 listed trans drain refill at 100K miles or every ten years. Some items are mileage only, others mileage or time whichever occurs first.

 

Edited by Dashmaster (see edit history)
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29 minutes ago, Dashmaster said:

DR James. The only guide you need to follow is in the Owners Manual under service intervals.

 

 

Kind of what I said waaaay back at the beginning of this thread, at which point many crapped on that and basically said "drive it until it breaks"... 🙄

 

Frankly, as an aerospace engineer, I have little patience for untrained people who think they know more than the engineers who designed the car.  I had to laugh at the people who point to anonymous videos on You Tube as gospel. Yeah, everything on the web is true.

 

Lotsa luck with that.

 

FYI, the owner's manual for the 2006 TL is available on line, so I did check it before my first response (rather than speculating or trying to use examples from unrelated vehicles). The interesting thing is that Acura doesn't provide service intervals for that car.  They rely on the onboard computer to tell you when the car needs service, period. I don't know if this is a good idea or not, since it likely does not take into account aging of items on cars that are only driven infrequently.

 

At this point, I've wasted too much time on this thread.  Good luck to the OP,  whatever you decide to do.

Edited by joe_padavano (see edit history)
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Remember, the owner's manual/manufacturer recommended service intervals assume that everyone uses their cars in the same way.  Some need more frequent service, some need less, depending on driving habits, climate, geography, etc.  They can be useful guides for people who don't know any better in terms of automotive maintenance, but of course can be adjusted based on what your car actually needs.

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On ‎1‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 3:59 PM, dr. james said:

the car needs new spark plugs $429.95

As for GM spark plugs they are good for 140,000 km / 86,000 miles as per the factory. And then they will still look good.

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9 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

Kind of what I said waaaay back at the beginning of this thread, at which point many crapped on that and basically said "drive it until it breaks"... 🙄

 

Frankly, as an aerospace engineer, I have little patience for untrained people who think they know more than the engineers who designed the car.  I had to laugh at the people who point to anonymous videos on You Tube as gospel. Yeah, everything on the web is true.

 

Lotsa luck with that.

 

FYI, the owner's manual for the 2006 TL is available on line, so I did check it before my first response (rather than speculating or trying to use examples from unrelated vehicles). The interesting thing is that Acura doesn't provide service intervals for that car.  They rely on the onboard computer to tell you when the car needs service, period. I don't know if this is a good idea or not, since it likely does not take into account aging of items on cars that are only driven infrequently.

 

At this point, I've wasted too much time on this thread.  Good luck to the OP,  whatever you decide to do.

Joe,

 

Thanks for your thoughts about the Acura.  I have the original owners manual in the glove box but I haven't looked at the book.  The service department at the dealership called yesterday to ask if I wanted to schedule an appointment for the $2000 repair estimate.  I declined.  I will let my local independent garage mechanic handle the repairs, as needed, and save myself some serious money.    The independent mechanic  mentioned the PVC valve replacement at approximately $40-$50 complete rather than the dealer estimate of $125.  I think my next new car may be battery powered.

 

Dr. J

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