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Gene Autry 1936 movie: masking identity of '36 Ford

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Last night I was watching the 1936 Gene Autry movie, “The Old Corral”.  What I saw in the movie was very unusual, masking the appearance of a 1936 Ford. Three wide bands run from the grill backward;  but in a scene as the Ford drove away in the distance, the bands didn’t extend beyond the grill on the driver’s side. Not being a Ford expert, I also noticed the front parking lights on top of the fenders. This didn’t look right to me.

The only reason that I can figure out for the altering the car’s appearance was something in licensing and Ford perhaps didn't have a license with Republic Studios.  None of the other cars in the movie were Fords; they were earlier Packard and a Buick.

36 Ford 1.jpg

36 Ford 2.jpg

36 Ford 3.jpg

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Those are pine trims which were an era accessory. They are ugly in my opinion but my Dad who grew up in the era with a 36 thought they were cool. The lights on the fenders are also not factory but a popular addition when they were used cars

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Posted (edited)
29 minutes ago, tomcarnut said:

Those are pine trims which were an era accessory. They are ugly in my opinion but my Dad who grew up in the era with a 36 thought they were cool. The lights on the fenders are also not factory but a popular addition when they were used cars

They're not made of pine. I'm guessing that tomcarnut means that they were made by the Pines Company, more commonly know as manufactures of the "Pines Winter Front" which was an after market accessory device which controlled the heat of the engine coolant by blocking and/or diminishing the amount of fresh air passing through the radiator of a car. Here's a Google image of the winter front:

1936-OLDSMOBILE-PINES-WINTER-FRONT-FT-GRILL-RADIATOR-PANEL-36-OLDS-CHEVY-6-8-CYL

 

Here's a Google Image of the '36 Ford accessory grille and hood trim:

 

IMG_20170915_0002.jpg

 

Edited by Hudsy Wudsy (see edit history)

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Those fender lights look like they were taken from a Buick!  I see that the grill is also covered with a screen. Maybe "Cool" by some standards at the time but not by me.

 

Thanks for the responses.

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My father's term "speed lines" to mimic speed  that wasn't  there. That is a bug screen over the grill held on with springs. As a kid I often had the job to clean the bugs off.

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The hub caps on the green roadster were also a popular dress up item, but I don't remember much about them.

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Late thirties fords needed something to make the the car more balanced looking.  Six more inches ahead of the windshield would have them look 100% better.  Lacking that the speed moldings the next best things.

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Yeah, compared to cars with inline sixes and eights, the V8 Fords definitely looked snub nosed. On the other hand, I always thought that they were particularly cute, despite the abbreviated nose.

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Funny to know folks wanted to “dress” up their cars even back then. 

Was there a Manny Moe and Jack or equivalent back then? 

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13 minutes ago, Pancho's ride said:

Funny to know folks wanted to “dress” up their cars even back then. 

Was there a Manny Moe and Jack or equivalent back then? 

 

No need for an equivalent:

 

In 1923,

Emanuel Rosenfeld (Manny),

Maurice Straus, (also Moe?),

Moe Radavitz (Moe),

and W. Graham Jackson (Jack),

founded PEP BOYS in Philadelphia, PA

 

I worked part-time after school in their Elizabeth, NJ store in the 1950s and for a short time beyond, and got to meet some of the founders.

 

Remember the trick some folks played with their give-away matchbooks?

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19 hours ago, Hudsy Wudsy said:

They're not made of pine. I'm guessing that tomcarnut means that they were made by the Pines Company, more commonly know as manufactures of the "Pines Winter Front" which was an after market accessory device which controlled the heat of the engine coolant by blocking and/or diminishing the amount of fresh air passing through the radiator of a car. Here's a Google image of the winter front:

1936-OLDSMOBILE-PINES-WINTER-FRONT-FT-GRILL-RADIATOR-PANEL-36-OLDS-CHEVY-6-8-CYL

 

Here's a Google Image of the '36 Ford accessory grille and hood trim:

 

IMG_20170915_0002.jpg

 

Yes they were not made of Pine but My Dad and his early V8 friends some of whom are still living including a former AACA president called them Pine Trims. My Dad was a very big Gene Autry Fan so he must have seen this movie and loved the accessory. He never put them on his high school 36 Sedan or his 36 Phaeton he purchased later and now in my garage but always talked about them when we occasionally saw them on a car at Hershey or elsewhere. Some Hollywood stars liked to customize their cars as some do today. At least the Pine Trims, Fender lights and hub caps can be easily changed for the  purist. Other than cast iron heads, my 36 Phaeton is stock. Once I sort out some electrical issues and get some tour miles on it this summer, I hope to put in an accessory Columbia Rear end which my Dad collected the parts for years and is mostly rebuild. Yes I know that is a no no  now for AACA judging but think ok for the Driver Participation Class. 

 

Tom Muth

Cincinnati, Ohio

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Sorry .......

 

i can’t see past the Cowboy Hats .....

 

Now I want me one of those big @ss cowboy hats .....

 

 

Cowboy Jim

( Looking for a big @ss cowboy hat )

Edited by Trulyvintage (see edit history)

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