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Our car has a safety inspection window sticker from the 1965 Glidden Tour, I also found a map of the 1967 tour under the seat, and oral history says the car went up Pikes Peak which could be the 1964 tour. Is there any way of finding out which tours an individual car has done on?

 

Thanks

Mick

1921 Lincoln Model L Merrimac Touring 

IMG_20180929_181040301.jpg

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There is no way of looking up a car and simply

reading off its tour record.  However, you could

probably check records by phoning the AACA Library:

Look up the 1964 Glidden Tour and see whether

a 1921 Lincoln was enrolled.  They will also have

the owner's name to verify the specific car.

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Neat car...how about a photo or two.

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I am trying to get it running for 100th birthday in 2021, I have the engine partially dismantled at the moment, has lots of carbon deposits everywhere (head, valves, etc) and lots of ware on the valve stems. The engine is a 1929 replacement, so I am trying to decide if spend money on it or  just clean it and close it back up so I can just run it around town and then have the original 1921 engine professionally rebuilt.    

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Making it run on the 29 if not too expensive or difficult is a good idea. Then you can take your time on the original and swap it out at some future time. Very unusual and neat Leland Lincoln........I like it!

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I have always been fond of the long, narrow and rounded bodies on those early Lincolns. They are also great runners. Congratulations on your "new" car and keep us posted on the progress. Enjoy!

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I have a good friend with a 23 Lincoln he took on the last Colorado Glidden a few years ago. Took it up Mt Evans and had no problems going up or coming down as Second gear had perfect engine braking avoiding heating up the two wheel brakes. It will do 55-60 but he keeps it 45 due the two brakes.

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 I was  on the 1965 glidden tour with my 1923 ford t with a Zagelmeyer camper body this was to  Luray  Va. A ioo miles a day for 5 day ,   round trip 1600 miles Sill have the camper Thanks JOHN GRUNDER

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In the 60s our Lincoln was owned then by Oakley Arnold Sumpter, he was from Port Deposit Maryland, he is the one that did the Glidden Tours we think. Here is a picture of him in his workshop. Sumpter brought the car from Josephine de Nancrede Henry the sister of the guy in the white (Howard). 

 

image.png.96a1ee965f93c43054733fcc7a5b5b59.png

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Posted (edited)

There should be Tour coverage in Antique Automobile a few issues after the Tour. My 1912 T was on the 1950 Glidden and that Tour got some great coverage along with a list of all the cars and owners. Nice looking Lincoln, good to see another car with hobby history coming back into the hobby.  Bob 

 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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It's possible that Patricia Swigart at the William E. Swigart Museum in Huntington PA might have the Glidden Tour records of that tour.  While the Museum is closed for the season, you might try her in the spring.

www.swigartmuseum.com

 

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In the references of the wikipedia Glidden Tour entry, there is a link to film of the 1964 Tour. Unfortunately, you need to log into facebook to see it.

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1 hour ago, Spinneyhill said:

In the references of the wikipedia Glidden Tour entry, there is a link to film of the 1964 Tour. Unfortunately, you need to log into facebook to see it.

 

 

Does Facebook have any info on the 1950 Glidden Tour. Can non members view it?

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On 1/8/2019 at 5:02 PM, MICKTHEDIG said:

100 year old, two wheel brakes, what could go wrong?

 

Especially on the way down from the top of Pikes Peak.... :o

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On 1/8/2019 at 5:02 PM, MICKTHEDIG said:

100 year old, two wheel brakes, what could go wrong?

 

Properly set up two wheel brakes are fine - usually I can throw someone through the windshield (sure, nowhere like today's standards, but do the job well).  You hear me preaching a lot about 20's and 30's car brakes as they really do work fine, but it takes a lot of hard learned lessons to build experience.  When I have shoes done the first thing people want to do is sell me the most high tech lining on the market today and that will not work - think low tech woven linings.   Sidenote: I am fine with bonding, but also insist on rivets. You cannot have worn parts, the shoes have to have the same arc as the drum, and,you adjust them with a feeler gauge and we are talking 1000th's.  Also , you need good cables, bushings, and ... everywhere else in the system.   I would say also that you are back into brakes every 5K to 10K miles.   You also have an emergency brake and it is there for more than parking.   And I also do not drive  an early car off the hand throttle.

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16 hours ago, DavidAU said:

This is fun !

 

Sidenote:  When I watched it the focus struck me - Via touring it seems that when everyone was driving brass cars we were  criticized for driving a 1931 Cadillac.  When everyone was driving 1930's car we criticized for driving a 1941 Cadillac.  When everyone seemed to be driving 50's cars we were then driving earlier cars.  And, ...  My point being people in 1965 and so may have been heavier photographers of the older cars verses the newer. 

 

By the way:  Really attractive Lincoln !

Edited by John_Mereness (see edit history)

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On 1/8/2019 at 10:36 AM, John_S_in_Penna said:

There is no way of looking up a car and simply

reading off its tour record.  However, you could

probably check records by phoning the AACA Library:

Look up the 1964 Glidden Tour and see whether

a 1921 Lincoln was enrolled.  They will also have

the owner's name to verify the specific car.

I'm wondering if that car didn't once belong to Oakley A. Sumpter of Havre de Grace, MD.  He drove a Lincoln on that tour.  His friend, Ernie Gill of W. Baltimore also drove a 1912 Packard on that tour.  I think they traveled together.  I was a very young and recent member of the Chesapeake Region in Baltimore at the time. Somebody in that club kept all of the newsletters, but he would have passed by now.  Maybe somebody else took over from him.

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On 1/13/2019 at 12:25 PM, John_Mereness said:

This is fun !

 

Sidenote:  When I watched it the focus struck me - Via touring it seems that when everyone was driving brass cars we were  criticized for driving a 1931 Cadillac.  When everyone was driving 1930's car we criticized for driving a 1941 Cadillac.  When everyone seemed to be driving 50's cars we were then driving earlier cars.  And, ...  My point being people in 1965 and so may have been heavier photographers of the older cars verses the newer. 

 

By the way:  Really attractive Lincoln !

Oh how I know that story from the brass car guys back in the day!!  Oakley Sumpter was one of the club leaders who were extremely critical of my "used car" 1939 Buick 41 series sedan.  Up until 1966 we really didn't like each other because of his views on cars like mine, or at least I didn't like him for the same reason.  However, I grew on him as the Club newsletter editor and eventually we became friendly.  He was basically a very friendly and nice guy and he was a good dancer too; especially he could do a dance called the "buck stomp".  Doing that he could light up the dance floor.  In those days we had an annual banquet, dance, AACA National Directors were invited and some would always come.  Oakley owned a fleet of school buses and put on a show for a lot of years in Havre de Grace, MD.  I remember very well him becoming upset because I drove my old "used car" '39 Buick up to that show in 1964 or 65.  That's the way all of the guys my Dad's age in the club thought in those times.  I guess some of the current "old guys" today who are around 80 like me, think the same way about the newer cars in the club today.  But I remember the "put down" of that "used car" term.  I don't do it.  Although I still love late 30s and 40s cars the most, I just bought a 1991 Buick Park Avenue with 3,000 original miles and I love it too.

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