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Vanderbilt Cup 1908 winner Old 16 information


DFeeney
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Attached are shots of an original Peter Helck acrylic commissioned by my father in 1962. It is It shows #16 and has been featured on Vanderbilt Cup Races website in their blog in 2018. Peter painted himself in with his trademark blue beret. I also have the pencil sketch and may have more correspondence. This painting is modestly unique in that it was never mass printed. It was copyrighted by my father in 1962. I am thinking that it may need to go to its next custodian soon. It is an 18.5 x 32 inch image on a 26.5 x 40 inch art board. It is in beautiful condition and includes some notes from Peter on the side.  This is now up on Sotheby's Hershey Auction for 2022.

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Edited by David McLean (see edit history)
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Posted (edited)

Does anyone reading hear and with an interest in Locomobile Old 16, have any information or knowledge as to why this Locomobile Race Car was painted the color it is still wearing?  I Assume that it is still wearing the remains of the factory original paint/color.

Al

Edited by alsfarms
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Posted (edited)

Al, if you look at Old 16, you will quickly see it was repainted sometime in the past. I would expect the original color to be a factory color because the two cars were produced in the Locomobile factory. I've never seen any documentation on when Old 16 was repainted and cannot comment on the source of the more recent paint.

 

That being said, the lighter color was probably picked so the cars would stand out against a dark background, making them easy to see on the Long Island Parkway. The color change on Old 16 may well have been to differentiate between the two cars. Most of the early pictures of the two cars depict two lightly colored cars, or, at least, two cars of the same color.

 

Locomobile was unique in that they entered two cars in this race, which was permitable at this time.

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Posted (edited)

Here is a link to a nice bit of information on the course of the Vanderbilt Cup Race of 1908, the year that Locomobile 16 won the race.  Thanks to H. Kroplick, resident expert, for his effort to put this together.  Enjoy......

Al

 

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I don’t know how common these are or how many were made.  But I picked it up recently. No markings on the backside. It is heavy......poured pot metal into a mold?  It is three dimensional regarding the components of it.  Maybe from the 60’s or 70’s?  I’m a kid who still likes toys. 

about 8-9 inches in length for reference. 

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Thankyou very much, Prewarnut. This article confirms Sessions bought the car in 1915 and not from Andrew Riker, as previously believed, but from the Locomobile factory. It was merely stored in Riker's barn. It even tells us the sale price of the car, $1,500. The bore and stroke is confirmed at 7.25 x 6. Very important piece of history from Session's own hand. It would be curious to know how much history of the car is included with the display at The Henry Ford.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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   I have two more articles I can share courtesy of the CT Digital Archive on-line. I'm not sure how well they reproduce here....The first is from the Bridgeport Post on 10/17/48 (next two pages). The last page is from the Bridgeport Post on 10/22/50. This last one states the engine displacement is 1100 c.i. (7 1/4 x 7 1/4 bore/stroke) contradicting Sessions and perhaps is the source of that lore. I can only speculate that this is wrong and would tend to believe the earlier article from Sessions who was a Locomobile dealer, was in the factory, at Riker's barn, and talked to the personnel first hand. There's also another article available talking about #16 being essentially similar to #1. All of this is now recalled 4 decades later in these accounts so the data could be suspect to a degree.

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Prewarnut,

 

You have stated the problem perfectly. In trying to research Locomobile race history, you find so much misinformation and misdirection, you have to conclude Andrew Riker was deliberately trying to muddy the waters. The bore and stroke of Old 16 seems to be consistently 7.25 x 6 in most of the period articles. This bore and stroke is often confused with the bore and stroke of the first car, the car Harold Thomas commissioned Locomobile to build for himself, which is 7x7. The Harold Thomas car had a T head motor while old 16 had an L head. The cars are different enough in pictures to identify them but you have to look closely. Moreover, Harold Thomas commissioned His car in 1905 and old 16 and her sister were built in 1906. It is easy to see how the cars were confused by newspapermen, who only wanted to sell papers.

Edited by AHa (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, AHa said:

Prewarnut,

 

You have stated the problem perfectly. In trying to research Locomobile race history, you find so much misinformation and misdirection, you have to conclude Andrew Riker was deliberately trying to muddy the waters. The bore and stroke of Old 16 seems to be consistently 7.25 x 6 in most of the period articles. This bore and stroke is often confused with the bore and stroke of the first car, the car Harold Thomas commissioned Locomobile to build for himself, which is 7x7. The Harold Thomas car had a T head motor while old 16 had an L head. The cars are different enough in pictures to identify them but you have to look closely. Moreover, Harold Thomas commissioned His car in 1905 and old 16 and her sister were built in 1906. It is easy to see how the cars were confused by newspapermen, who only wanted to sell papers.

Appears your confused. It a F head not an L head.

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