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MurkyBeef

Buyer's Guide

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Hello all,

 

I first posted something similar on the broad forum because I didn't know what I was doing but I eventually found the spot, I'm in college and getting into classic cars with my dad, he promised to help me restore an old car of my choice next summer (assuming I keep good grades) and I really love all of the Studebaker vehicles, I was wondering what tips you all might have regarding buying these cars and what to look out for. Any and all knowledge is greatly appreciated and I can't wait to become a part of the community. As of right now I have little to no mechanical knowledge, but I am excited to learn.

 

Thank you all in advance,

-Owen

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Me. Beef; Welcome to the world of "old cars". I'm sure all of us would like to know what you consider to be an old car, as it would be a good starting point of reference of your preference. Would it be Pre- War [WW 2]  post war or newer?  What a great way to spend time with your dad! Some of my best times have been working with buddies to iron out a problem on one of their cars. Great to hear of someone your age getting into antiques.    Gofer it! 

 

Respectfully Commander Dave ;    Care taker of a 1929 Commander Roadster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Should have been  Mr. Beef           Old Commander Dave.  When I started school there weren't as many letters or numbers to learn and not nearly as much history to learn.

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@commander Dave 

I talked to some of the people on the general forum where I first posted and found I very much like the Avanti. I'd consider any cars with some actual style to be old cars since it seems these days the cars all look the same and are quite boring. You'd think a computer science student would want the latest and greatest tech in their car but I'd be ok with just a heater and a steering wheel (maybe some seats would be good to)

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Posted (edited)

Owen,

There are any number ways to get started and any number of hurdles to fall over. 😉

Since you are posting here I assume you're leaning to a post WWII Studebaker. An excellent choice by most any measure.

This is a great forum that leans heavily to the pre WWII interest, and I think you will find a great deal more attention and a lot more folks with advice and opinions at the Studebaker Drivers Club Forum, which deals with ALL things Studebaker over 300 years, but does lean more to the era you are looking for. http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.com/

Best to participate in both.

Also join the Studebaker Drivers Club. You needn't own one to be a member; but the access provided can help immensely in the final model(s) you decide to seek.

 

http://studebakerdriversclub.com/index.asp

Edited by starlightcoupe (see edit history)
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Studes are a great choice.  Compared to the other independents we have excellent vendor support and parts supply.  Unless you are looking for a long-term project avoid rusty cars.  Assuming you are on a budget I would look for a solid car as original as possible and focus on getting it running.   Too many people get a "new" project car, tear into it, then realize they don't have the time, skills, or money to finish and end up with a pile of car parts rather than a car.   Turning Wheels and the Studebaker forms are a great place to start looking, lots of knowledge and cars for sale.   Best of luck!

 

Nathan

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