Tom Laferriere

1969 Shelby GT500 Fastback with Auto Trans and Air

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1969 was the last year for the Shelby Mustang, however, unsold 1969 models were given 1970 vehicle identification numbers with 2 visuals changes; front spoiler and two black hood stripes.  Now based on the new SportsRoof and convertible Mustang body styles, Shelby’s newly designed Mustang shared very little resemblance to the production Mustang. The GT350 and GT500 were still available in both fastback or convertible.

 

The front end design on the ’69 Shelby was completely new. Both the fenders and the hood were fiberglass and created a large rectangular grille opening which carried two 7 inch headlights. Beneath the bumper, Lucas foglamps were mounted. The hood contained three forward-facing NASA scoops, the center one providing air to into the engine’s intake system. Also on the hood were two rear-facing scoops. Brake scoops can be found on the front fenders, as did the rear, all providing air to the brakes. Rear scoops can be found on convertibles mounted lower in order to prevent any interference with the convertible top mechanism. In the rear, fiberglass extensions were added to the fiberglass deck lid to create a pronounced spoiler. ’65 Thunderbird taillights were used, and a unique aluminum exhaust collector exited in the center beneath the bumper.

 

Side stripes can be found on both models with either GT350 or GT500 lettering at the front fender in front of the brake scoop. Snake emblems can be found behind the rear side windows and also on the left side of the front grille. Also, Cobra Jet emblems, like the ones found on the ’68 GT500KR, were used on the GT500’s front fenders.

 

The interior of the Shelby was once again the production Mustang’s Deluxe Interior Decor Group, available in either black or white, with Shelby identification on the door panels, steering wheel and passenger’s dash. The console top housed two two Stewart Warner gauges, oil and amps, along with two toggle switches for foglamps and courtesy lights. The instrument cluster contained a 8000 rpm tachometer, 140 mph speedometer and fuel gauges. All of the fastback Shelbys once again have the inertia-reel harnesses while the convertibles kept the same 1968 type roll bar.

 

This Shelby was the recipient of a 15 year long, fully documented restoration including all receipts and pictures along the way. Over $175,000 was spent to make this one of the finest Shelbys you will ever see.   NOS parts were used whenever possible (Lucas lights, marker lights, boomerang moldings, door handles, strikers, dash, scuff plates, etc) and it was was completed, it was never driven or shown. Libbey’s Classic Car Restoration Center, Inc. of Shrewsbury, Massachusetts performed its rotisserie restoration.  

 

For documentation, it has its Marti report, factory build sheet, and dealer invoice as well as being listed in the Shelby Registry (under John Willams), which whom it was purchased from in 1989 by the current owner.   Matching 428 CJ engine/transmission with 3:50 Traction-Lok differential which is just a perfect combination for cruising and to get up and GO…and that it does exceptionally well.  Powerful, quiet engine with no noises or smoke of any kind. The transmission shifts nicely up and down all the gears, brakes perfectly, and steers straight.  Great oil pressure, charging appropriately, and no overheating issues or any other issues whatsoever.  Add the factory cold Air-Conditioning and it makes the driving experience that much better.

 

I don’t think you will find a better example.

 

Located in Smithfield, RI and offered at $98,000.  All photographs and details at the link.  

http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1969-shelby-gt500-fastback

 

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Looks like a new old stock super muscle car......right color, right options, and priced at half the restoration cost. If your a Ford guy, this car has to float your boat. 

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I dont know a whole lot about muscle cars but this really seemed like a steal, or did I miss something? What would this car sell for on a major auction? 

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Somebody did get a great deal.   I think that most people selling a car make the mistake of asking for the moon and then watching the car sit on the market forever and become stale.  

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Fortunately, for those of us who actually like automatic transmissions, you can find some really good deals on really great cars. When I was a young kid, I didn't want a car with an automatic transmission BECAUSE I COULDN'T AFFORD IT!  With my limited funds, I had to think into the future, and I knew an automatic would require a LOT of money to overhaul. We had a very similar Shelby when I was growing up, a 1968 GT 500KR that had an automatic. Very fun car to drive, but after a while, it needed transmission work. The car was sold off because of that alone (Shelbys weren't worth very much back then).

In the collector car world, the cost to overhaul the automatic is minimal in regard to buying the car in the first place. They are a joy to drive. So, for me anyway, the way I looked at cars as a kid had more to do with "how much will it cost?" or "can I repair that myself?" than it did with the fun factor of pushing in that heavy-duty clutch a million times during a 2-hour-long traffic jam. Do I like shifting? Yes, but the novelty has worn off for me. I've been driving stick shifts since I was 10 years old.

Before you stick your nose too high up in the air the next time you look through the window of something like this and see an automatic, take it out for a drive. I'll bet you change your mind. And if you do change your mind, you probably will find you're spending a lot less money on a "dream car."

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3 minutes ago, West Peterson said:

Fortunately, for those of us who actually like automatic transmissions, you can find some really good deals on really great cars. When I was a young kid, I didn't want a car with an automatic transmission BECAUSE I COULDN'T AFFORD IT!  With my limited funds, I had to think into the future, and I knew an automatic would require a LOT of money to overhaul. We had a very similar Shelby when I was growing up, a 1968 GT 500KR that had an automatic. Very fun car to drive, but after a while, it needed transmission work. The car was sold off because of that alone (Shelbys weren't worth very much back then).

In the collector car world, the cost to overhaul the automatic is minimal in regard to buying the car in the first place. They are a joy to drive. So, for me anyway, the way I looked at cars as a kid had more to do with "how much will it cost?" or "can I repair that myself?" than it did with the fun factor of pushing in that heavy-duty clutch a million times during a 2-hour-long traffic jam. Do I like shifting? Yes, but the novelty has worn off for me. I've been driving stick shifts since I was 10 years old.

Before you stick your nose too high up in the air the next time you look through the window of something like this and see an automatic, take it out for a drive. I'll bet you change your mind. And if you do change your mind, you probably will find you're spending a lot less money on a "dream car."

 

The older I get the more I appreciate the virtues of an automatic transmission, particularly in a car I drive every day. While I love the feel of a well-timed heel-and-toe downshift, it's the rare old car that makes it truly joyous to execute. Shifting gears on my 1929 Cadillac is hardly an activity I look forward to, synchromesh notwithstanding, and there really aren't any cars with 3-on-the-tree that I would call "fun" to shift.

 

Having raced a lot of Mustangs and Corvettes in my youth, I will admit that the point-and-shoot nature of the automatic cars made them competitive when there was a less than professional driver behind the wheel. My earliest days were in a 5.0 Mustang GT with an automatic, and when I was honing my skills and earning my SCCA competition license, that automatic let me concentrate on the line and braking and the cars around me rather than shift points and balancing the chassis. It made a difference in my learning curve and I can't recall it being any less fun on the track.

 

That said, I still find it borderline offensive that Porsche and Ferrari sell automatic vs. manual transmissions by about 10:1 and Corvettes have come standard with an automatic for 40 years (does Ferrari even offer a manual transmission anymore?).

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Posted (edited)

What is shocking to me is the fact that an air/auto musclecar is more desirable than the equivalent 4 speed car.   Just shows where things are going and why resto-mods are popular.

 

I'm definitely one of those guys that walks around shows and looks in disdain when I see an automatic in a musclecar,  especially a column auto!   But those days seem to be changing.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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Although I admire the 4 speed option in my car due to its rarity, automatic and air is the way to go...My 1973 Mercury Cougar XR-7 then and now.  My high School car, sold in the early 90's and re-acquired two years ago.   

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 Tom I always knew you were a trophy guy....... so much for just driving it!😝

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On 1/4/2019 at 4:20 PM, Tom Laferriere said:

This Shelby was the recipient of a 15 year long, fully documented restoration...  and it was was completed,

it was never driven or shown. 

 

A high-powered car never driven!  Well, at least

the owner preserved it for the next owner.

But if someone wants to pay the money for a 

nice Shelby, does he just want to look at the

nameplates and decals?  Would anyone pay for

a lobster-tail dinner and just look at it, or spend

the money for a cruise and never go on the boat?!

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2 hours ago, John_S_in_Penna said:

 

A high-powered car never driven!  Well, at least

the owner preserved it for the next owner.

But if someone wants to pay the money for a 

nice Shelby, does he just want to look at the

nameplates and decals?  Would anyone pay for

a lobster-tail dinner and just look at it, or spend

the money for a cruise and never go on the boat?!

John, strangely enough, it's true. 

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I'm with Tom.  I drive my 70 Cutlass convert (automatic & air) everywhere in the summer.  If it were a 4 speed or didn't have air it would spend more time in the garage.

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9 hours ago, Tom Laferriere said:

All natural 80's hair baby!

 

You were lucky you started with that much.   Btw,  I say this as a guy that owned 2 Cougars,  but the Mustang guys vs Cougar guys is an interesting dynamic.   Back in HS,  the Cougar guys were all wearing trench coats. 

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2 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Yeah but in HS the Camaro guys were the coolest.

 

But the VW van guys got the most.

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Posted (edited)

As of 1982 in my suburban NE HS of 1200 kids the pecking order was super clear:

 

1.  Anybody that actually had a 4 speed.

2.  Any year GTO or Chevelle SS but ESPECIALLY 66-67.

3.  69 Camaro

4.  other year camaro (we had 3 different 1980 model year cars)

5-10 Anything pre 1972

11. Tom's Cougar

 

We didn't have any, but if we had any HEMI cars that would trump #1, even a column auto.  We probably had VWs and such but I didn't notice.

 

Mustangs would be in there with Camaro,  but we had next to none that I can remember.

Edited by alsancle (see edit history)

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Touche Jack!!  😆

 

Back to the subject vehicle.  I believe there is a place for everything in the hobby from an immobile project car to a driver toured extensively or a perfect trailer queen.  Seller I think has same philosophy.  End Buyer should collect some trophys before wearing out those tires....

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our top dogs were my buddy's 70 ss396 chevelle, a $5 k car in 79 or 80.  Another kid had a bbc 67 or 68 Camaro.

 

3 of us had 70 73 Camaros, red, white and my blue one. 😊

 

An upper classman had a nice midyear vette for summer and a new dodge van w murals, smoked glass and sidepipes for everyday.  Bastard....

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3 hours ago, Steve_Mack_CT said:

Bastard....

 

We had two brothers that when they turned 16 the grandma would buy them any car they wanted.

This was mid to late sixties.

Of coarse when the oldest turned 16 he got a new Vette, the younger brother got the nicest 57 Chevy they could find.

Seems that all they had to do was tell grandma they wanted another car and they would get it.

They always had EVERYBODY out classed as far as vehicles.

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18 hours ago, Tom Laferriere said:

John, strangely enough, it's true. 

 

Yeah,  seems like the seller might be a weirdo.

 

RE: new cars in HS.  We had a few different kids that got brand new cars in HS.  One was working 50 hours week after school, the others had their parents co-sign the loans.  I liked all of them but I'm not sure life was kind in the long run.  Not sure there is any correlation to the new cars though...

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