Blaze2305

Storing a car over winter

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Okay first off for some info i live in winnipeg manitoba so winters can be something else. I’m planning on buyin a 57 chev soon, it’s abit of a restoration project, body is full with what id call minor rust. Here’s he thing i will not have a garage to store it in till next year but this deal is too good to pass up, i plan on storing it outside, not going to touch the body till i get my garage. So how do i go about this without more issues, i plan on putting it on blocks of course to try and keep from rotting, what’s the best way to tarp it? are there any devices to try to prevent rust/rot? and maybe even pests?

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Blaze, congratulations on your purchase!

Your car should be okay outside if it is properly

covered, but do NOT cover it with a tarpaulin.

Tarps will retain moisture and cause your car to

deteriorate.

 

I'd recommend buying a good, heavy-duty car cover

specifically made for outdoors.  Such covers can be

sewn specifically for your car (and are therefore more

expensive, maybe $300), or you can buy a generally-sized

cover that may come in small, medium, and large sizes,

and be half that price.

 

Numerous companies sell them;  one is California

Car Cover Company.  Auto-supply chain stores sell,

from what I've seen, flimsy and low-quality covers that

aren't anything like what I refer to.

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I agree with John. Although I do not have your cold weather I would not recommend covering the car at all, with a tarp or any type of car cover, as this will hold the moisture onto your car, causing it to rust quicker. I had a guy here who covered his 39 Willy's with a car cover for 3 months during our rainy season, when he took the cover off his car the top of the hood and the roof peeled off with the cover. The car was beyond recovery.

 Put the car on stands, drain out all your radiator fluids and clear off the snow and ice whenever you get a chance. 

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9 minutes ago, viv w said:

I agree with John. Although I do not have your cold weather I would not recommend covering the car at all, with a tarp or any type of car cover, as this will hold the moisture onto your car, causing it to rust quicker. I had a guy here who covered his 39 Willy's with a car cover for 3 months during our rainy season, when he took the cover off his car the top of the hood and the roof peeled off with the cover. The car was beyond recovery.

 Put the car on stands, drain out all your radiator fluids and clear off the snow and ice whenever you get a chance. 

Like the other guy said though, if you have a good breathable cover why would moisture get trapped?

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The cloth of the cover holds the moisture in place longer, than if the water were just on the bodywork, much the same as a pile of dead leaves will hold moisture.

 An alternative is to put some wooden pallets and wooden planks across the car before putting a tarp or cover over the vehicle, but make sure that air can circulate between the car and the cover and underneath the vehicle to avoid condensation.

 I personally would not cover the car at all, if it is only going to be outside for one winter.

 Parked at your house, there is no danger from salted roads, and if you consider the inside of a fridge in the old days before self defrosting and plastic liners came along, those old fridges had painted insides, that frosted up and were defrosted numerous times and they survived for decades. So one winter of snow and ice !!, I think your car will survive it without too many problems.

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One good source for storage space until you build 

your own garage:

An elderly neighbor who may have a 2-car garage

with a vacant bay.  Garages near me rent for

$50 to $75 a month, but a friend of mine made

a deal for $25 a month.

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What about putting it in one of those auto shelters? like those tarp canopy things? or would that be just as bad as tarping a car?

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3 minutes ago, Blaze2305 said:

What about putting it in one of those auto shelters? like those tarp canopy things? or would that be just as bad as tarping a car?

 

There was a discussion on the forum on that subject

a month or more ago.  My observation:  those canopies,

made of a fabric and thin metal piping, are not designed

to handle snow load.  And don't think that you can simply

knock the snow off daily, because a surprise snowfall

is likely to collapse the structure and damage your car.

 

I would not use such a thing in Winnipeg!

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i have a couple set up in my yard and they’ve never collapsed, just wondering about moisture content in them.

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Moth balls!  My Studebaker was in a barn on blocks for 42 years and critters did not get in it to eat the seats, wiring or find a warm dry cozy place to live. The owners would throw a bunch of moth balls under and around it. They did this on a regular basis and it seemed to work. The only problem it took six months to get rid of that smell. Well worth it in the long run. 

Have fun. 

Dave S 

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For several years I've left Bounce dryer sheets inside my cars to keep mice and rats away. Rodents can ruin the interior and wiring of a car. I have no definite proof that Bounce dryer sheets work, but I generally haven't had a problem since using them, but they need to be refreshed when the fragrance fades. Leaving them in for an overly long or second winter season will not work. When I've let them sit too long in a car in a mousy environment the evidence of pests returns.

 

Some people have suggested Irish Spring soap because of it's strong scent. I've tried this but I'm not sure it works - if it does, you'll also need to change it out when the scent fades. I also buy some stuff at the local farm store (Orscheln's) that claims to keep pests away so I'm using that with my Bounce sheets. Again, no problems so far, but that might just be because the place I'm storing my cars at now is relatively free of mice compared to the old place. There's a feral cat community living next door to my current storage place, and that probably helps. Also, with severe Canadian or upper mid-western winters, you really want to resist the urge to start the car when the weather gets temporarily warmer (above freezing) for a couple of days. The engine heat and blower heat will draw mice to your car like a magnet. Obviously OK to do that once the car has a mouse-free environment indoors, but for the one season it sits outside I wouldn't.

 

Good luck with the car.

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Sidenote:  I ended up with an Auburn because the fellow put it in a car trailer for a period and when opened door found the car had done a lot of sweating in the winter (and now an original car that did not need restored needs restored now).

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17 hours ago, Blaze2305 said:

i have a couple set up in my yard and they’ve never collapsed, just wondering about moisture content in them.

 

put plastic on ground and install vents

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Posted (edited)
On 1/4/2019 at 7:44 AM, Blaze2305 said:

Okay first off for some info i live in winnipeg manitoba so winters can be something else. I’m planning on buyin a 57 chev soon, it’s abit of a restoration project, body is full with what id call minor rust. Here’s he thing i will not have a garage to store it in till next year but this deal is too good to pass up, i plan on storing it outside, not going to touch the body till i get my garage. So how do i go about this without more issues, i plan on putting it on blocks of course to try and keep from rotting, what’s the best way to tarp it? are there any devices to try to prevent rust/rot? and maybe even pests?

With a couple of cars in the same condition as what you describe here, I have stored them outside for a period of years covered with 6 Mil black plastic and they did not suffer for it.  In fact, one car has an exceptional original interior that I would say is above 90% (except for the worn out carpet) and it is still just as nice as when I bought the car.  I buy the 10' x 100' roll and it drapes over the sides just enough to shed water but not so low to the ground as to not allow air to flow.  I secure it to the car with spring clamps at the wheel well openings, door handles, and wherever else necessary and it takes the beating from the wind without ripping.  What is amazing is it will last two to three years.  Don't buy the clear stuff.  The UV will cause it to shatter within about a month.   

Edited by W_Higgins (see edit history)

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One person I know of had a plastic tarp over his

1958 Buick Limited.  Because moisture stayed beneath

the tarp, the original lacquer paint lifted off in a few areas.

 

A properly made outdoor car cover is a small cost in

comparison with the value of a nice car.

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In my case, and I suspect that of the o.p.'s as well, if anything I stored outside with plastic over it was nice enough that I didn't want the finish to get messed up, I wouldn't be attaching spring clamps to the painted surfaces.  As has been proven time and again, no painted surface that anyone wishes to preserve in its current state should be stored outside of a closed building.

 

I would also add that what most people consider "tarps" (those cheap woven poly types) are unsuitable for most of the applications for which they are sold.  They allow moisture through in pretty short order and hold it there like a sponge, are abrasive, and in no time the sun destroys them.  

 

 

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