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Rawhide0

1918 Dodge Bros Military staff car

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Hello everyone,

I need some help here,  I can't seems to find any info on world War one Military vehicles dodge made. I'm interested in purchasing one that the owner says is a military model because of the wheels it has (artillery disc wheels). Can anyone date what year the car is and if it may be Military made or not?  Thanks.

 

Jon

85bd8beefd9cc7ff9b8f390be7c0e972cf2f4c0f-1S_1280.jpg

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One will need the frame number and engine numbers to begin with to establish what year  first.

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artillery wheels are on plenty of cars that weren't destined for military - I don't think the cadillac's that were definitely used in world war 1 even had wheels like that

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I'm no expert, but I thought that solid steel wheels like those shown in this photo were usually described as, "disk wheels," whereas "artillery wheels" referred to wheels with LOTS of very short and and very stout wooden spokes. Can someone enlighten me on this, please? 

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, lump said:

I'm no expert, but I thought that solid steel wheels like those shown in this photo were usually described as, "disk wheels," whereas "artillery wheels" referred to wheels with LOTS of very short and and very stout wooden spokes. Can someone enlighten me on this, please? 

 

You have it correct, but spoked artillery style wheels  were made in steel also. The car pictured has disc wheels.

Edited by JFranklin (see edit history)
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There were 3 kinds of wheels available back then. Wooden spoke artillery wheels, these were standard equipment on most cars. Wire wheels and steel disc wheels.

 

Wood spoke artillery wheels were the most popular and most practical wheel. They were tough and flexible, and would bounce back from knocks, rocks, potholes etc.

 

Wire wheels were lighter and could be trued up to run smoother at high speeds. They were used on racing and sport models. In rough service they would break spokes and often needed repairs.

 

Disc wheels were something fancy, usually an option. They were strong but if they got bent they stayed bent, they would not spring back. They did not absorb shock and vibration like wood, and were considered noisier than wood.

 

For these reasons I would expect military vehicles to use wood spoke 'artillery' wheels. By the way the name came from special wood spoke wheels made for light cannons or artillery pieces. They were stronger than ordinary wagon wheels because they were made differently with the spokes mortised to interlock together at the hub which was further reinforced with steel or iron plates bolted through the spokes.

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The three star plate on front maybe a clue as to who used the vehicle. Maybe Liggett or Bullard. This could be a staff car used after WWI, as mentioned use serial numbers to date the vehicle.

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Posted (edited)

The Army bought hundreds of Cadillac V-8 touring cars in that era, and I rather doubt a three star general would ride in a Dodge when there were hundreds of Cadillacs available. You need proof of its past, not rumor, conjecture,  or any other word of mouth. The color of the car and the front plate are meaningless.  Here is a photo of Black Jack Pershing in his Cadillac during the war.

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Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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Dodge cars were used certainly on the Mexican border during what is called The Punitive Expedition. Relatively few entered Mexico, if only because even though a large part of the National Guard was called up, none of crossed the border. All of the incursions were by Regular troops - mostly Cavalry and there was an extreme shortage of people who could drive a car in the Regular Army. The one famous episode was Lt. George Pattons raid on the San Miguelito Ranch with (I think) 3 Dodge cars where he killed Julio Cardenas, one of Villa's lieutenants, and brought the body back tied over the hood. Somewhere, I have some photos of Dodge cars on the border. They were quite popular, both rugged and dependable. My guess is that they were perfectly straight commercial models.  There was no time to produce a "military" model and the Army had had so little association with motor vehicles in 1916 that I'm not certain there were more than a handful of officers who could drive. Patton was unusual, but he was wealthy in his own right so owning a car was not difficult for him. Active involvement in WWI changed all that. The new emphasis on motorized transport presented a real challenge for the army. They had to organize the MTC (Motor Transport Corp) to maintain cars and trucks and to teach men how to operate them. A huge number of the post-WWI mechanics came out of that Army service.

 

Ed is quite right... a 3-star General (there were not many) would have had a much more significant car than a Dodge.

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I  own  several   original  ww 1  vehicles including  an  original  1918  Dodge  light  repair  truck.   I  also  own  a  replica  which  I  built   of  the  repair  truck  and  a   196  Dodge  touring  car  the  type  that  Pershing  brought  to  Mexico. Pershing  did   NOT  bring   hundreds  In  fact  I  think  the number was   more  like  20.  There  were  no  Dodge Cars with  disc  wheels  in  1918  as  they   were  not   made  until    the  early   20s. They  were  copied  from  the  French  disc  wheel  in  fact  early  ones  have  a  metal  tag  MICHELIN BUDD    wheels.  The  color  on  the   car  could  in fact  be  correct   for  post   war   as  I  have  seen  original paint  jobs  that  faded to  that   pale  OD> However   the  disc  wheels  throw  me   off   as I  never  saw  them  on  any  Dodge  military   car  EXCEPT  the  replica  I  built   where  I  used  them!!!  I  have  tons  of  pictures   and   even  have  some  for  sale.... Re Pershing  in  Mexico  he  did  use  a  Dodge  Likely  a  1915   model     in  france  he  was  in  Cadillacs.

 

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