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61polara

Trunk Gasket Removal

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I've acquired a nice 1950 Chrysler Club Coupe and in sorting it out I've found that when the car was painted, the trunk gasket was installed in the body water channel not to the deck lid.  The trunk leaks a small amount now.  The gasket was installed with 3M Super Weather Strip Adhesive.  Does any one know of a solvent that will remove this adhesive and not harm the paint?

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Posted (edited)

On a C48 1950 Chrysler Club Coupe the gasket fits into the truck body groove channel NOT on the trunk lid say like on a 1946-48 Chrysler.

1949 on up the gasket stayed in the body channel not on the lid.

Windsor trunk.jpg

Edited by c49er (see edit history)

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Chances are any solvent you use will mess up the pant.  You might try some 3m stripe remover very carefully but  and it will depend on the type of paint used to repaint the car.

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Posted (edited)

I know that GM cars the weatherstrip mounts to the body as well in that era. There is a 3M weatherstrip adhesive solvent that I had used that did not damage the paint on my car, but paint products can be very different. The product seems to be designed for use to cleanup slop from the install, not really a release agent. 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)

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1 hour ago, Penske PC-7 said:

 

That is to remove residue from an installation, it is not a release agent

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11 hours ago, c49er said:

On a C48 1950 Chrysler Club Coupe the gasket fits into the truck body groove channel NOT on the trunk lid say like on a 1946-48 Chrysler.

1949 on up the gasket stayed in the body channel not on the lid.

Windsor trunk.jpg

Thanks for clearing this up.  I thought I read in the '50 shop manual that on coupes and convertibles it is mounted on the deck lid but on sedans it goes on the body in the channel.  I'm leaving it where it is on the body.

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I would consider tearing it out,  then removing the residual rubber with a nylon glass installing tool. Tape the area off and use lacquer thinner to remove the residual rubber & adhesive . Then install a new gasket.

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When scraping off the old gasket, careful use of a heat gun can be helpful.  Depending on the gasket condition, you may be able to heat sections of the gasket and channel and remove it largely intact.  If you're going to try the solvent approach, wait for the solvent to completely evaporate before trying the heat gun, you don't want to mix the two.  A spark from the heat gun and the right concentration of solvent vapors could be really bad.

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Ensure the adhesive removal product will not dissolve the old enamel or laquer paints.  It may only be rated for leaving the modern two-part epoxies untouched after use.

 

Craig

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Thanks Guys for all of your help and great suggestions, but C49er came up with the correct answer.  The gasket is in the right place, so I don't have to remove it.

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3 hours ago, 61polara said:

Thanks for clearing this up.  I thought I read in the '50 shop manual that on coupes and convertibles it is mounted on the deck lid but on sedans it goes on the body in the channel.  I'm leaving it where it is on the body.

Dave,

If you change your mind, let me know. I've got a cleaner from a local body shop. My friend used it on his old trunk gasket with no harm to the paint. Then he passed it on to me. I used it on some adhesive leaks with same results. And a little went a long way... still have most of the can.

Not home right now and don't remember the name.

Phillip 

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You will most likely not find the correct rubber with that little lip that just slightly rolls over the edge of the U-channel.

If that trunk rubber is OE nice ... factory glued tight even at the bottom you have a very nice rust free 1949-52 Chrysler🙂

I have a couple of them. Both hardtops.

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A garden hose, flash light,  masking tape and a helper is all you need to find the leaks ,if the rubber is still good.

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