Jeffltd

1954 Dodge Royal Coupe with 9,872 miles

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 Please reread my post with additional warnings.

 While it may be technically possible to remove the oil pump drive like I mentioned, but it may not be practical in everyday life.

 I don't want to get a home hobbiest in a lot of trouble, so if you do not know Hemi's, don't do it.

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Hey Folks,

So I’ve taken possession of my 54 Royal Coupe. Where do I find parts, like a hood spring, a spring for the front brake shoes, rebuild kits for my brake systems, carburetor, fuel pump, etc.? Are there any specialty outlets that handle these cars? Or I’m I just going to NAPA, Pep boys, Auto Zone and hoping they can reference them in their books?

Also, I need to create a set of keys for the doors, ignition, glovebox and trunk. Any ideas?

Thanks for the help!

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I've been buying most of my brake stuff off ebay.  Alot of it in kit forms like all 4 wheel cylinders (yours has 6 I believe) master and rubber hoses as one package.  Depending on how original you want it to be you may want to get NOS ones and rebuild them.  I would personally just buy new and keep the originals.  You can probably find an NOS brake spring on there as well.  If not you could try the local stores.  They should be able to come up with something.  I have used a place called Roberts as well in MA?  they stock alot of what you need.  

The hood spring you may be able to find NOS.  There is also Andy Benrbaum?  which I think sold recently that has alot of NOS stuff.  Again I just search ebay alot.  Some people don't like it,  but once you figure out how to narrow searches alot of stuff is available. 

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 NAPA is a good source for older parts if they take the time to look it up.

 Go in person and introduce yourself and explain how you need the parts and you will be back for more.

 

 Or you can go to napaonline and look them up your self.

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 A locksmith that has been around a while should be able to cut your keys if you give him the number or possably come out and make one. Frequently the numbers can be found on door handles, at least with old Buicks. Otherwise you might need to send a lock into a locksmith to have one made. Jesser's is a specialist in old car keys;  http://www.jessersclassickeys.com/

 

Carl

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Things like brakes, carburetor, fuel pump, fan belts, spark plugs etc can be bought from your local NAPA store if you have the right parts man. If you have a dusty old parts store manned by old bald headed or gray haired clerks standing behind a rack of parts books, that is the place. The shiny new Autozone manned by a kid with purple hair and a snot ring probably won't be much help.

 

I have also had good luck with Rockauto although, it can be hit or miss on some older cars.

 

The point is parts for fifties cars are generally available IF you can get a good part number to look it up. I mean mechanical parts, body parts, chrome, trim are a different matter.

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Roberts Motor Parts and Andy Bernbaum (now some other name that escapes me) and Then and Now auto parts as mentioned by West were good sources.  Kanter auto parts too.  And yes even the local NAPA if they are willing to help you.

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I just want to say congratulations on acquiring the new old Dodge, and thanks for posting the pic of the nice old Jag. You obviously know what nice old cars are all about, so I'm sure the Dodge lives up to your assessment. NAPA won't have the hood spring. Why do you need another one? If it's because of corrosion, then be cautious of corrosion elsewhere, as others have said. The internet and ebay are the best bet for a lot of the parts you mentioned. On the other hand, NAPA has often surprised me for what they've had in stock that will work on my '54 Ford Ranch Wagon.

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Soon, George. I’m cleaning about fifty years of dirt off it and hopefully getting it running.

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Yes pictures... before and after please.

We need to see this exciting purchase.

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I certainly will. In the meantime, could someone give me the skinny on dropping the oil pan on the Red Ram 271 Engine? I’ve removed the starter and crossover exhaust pipe, and all of the bolts on the pan. The manual says to, "disconnect the steering linkage at idler arm support bracket and allow linkage to settle away from the oil pan."

What is the, “ Idler arm support bracket?” and is this the best way to drop the pan?

Thanks!

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Well, the idler arm is usually opposite of the steering gear box and ties the right and left side together.

Without actually seeing it I would look toward the passenger side for an arm that hinges to the frame (bracket).

With that bracket taken loose the whole assembly should drop enough to let the pan clear. I would suspect that the front wheels will turn either toward or away from each other to let all the steering parts drop enough to let the pan down.

There will be the oil pump pick up that will try and fight you but if you are following the book there should be a way.

I sometimes have had to raise an engine or take more steering apart to get a pan off.

Its not a very fun job, especially if you don't have a lift.

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I might ad that you may or may not want the weight if the car on the suspension.

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I have the car on jack stands. Okay, I’ll look to the passenger side for a good place to disassemble. Thanks, Jack!

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Jack,

I’m still little confused. My car has power steering and as I lay under the car looking up at the engine, on my right, near the passenger car tire, the power steering rack ends at a mount on the bottom of the frame. A castle nut with a cotter pin holds it there. On my left, near the drivers side tire, the power steering rack attaches to the arm coming off the steering box, beneath the steering column. 

Which end do I disconnect? And its the passenger side, how do I keep the shaft from spinning as I try to remove the castle nut?

Thanks!

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I wish I had one of these to look at to make suggestions.

An idler arm would be like in the same situation as the steering box except on the other side.

It would move with a tie rod from the end of the pitman arm (that's the arm that goes from the gear box) to the idler arm on the other side. They may not be to far apart.

I will look for an illustration so as to be sure what I am talking about.

I take it there is no illustration in the Motors manual.

There are better experts than me on these fora, I am surprised no one else has chimed in.

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I just reread your post.

You refer to a steering rack, I think you probably mean something else as these cars didn't use a rack.

You are trying to drop the oil pan so by now you have it loose but it wont come down.

Therefor you need to take something else loose that will lower the steering parts so that the oil pan can come down.

The castellated nut I will assume may be a ball joint type of tie rod end. You wont have to hold the shaft of those, they are a tapered shaft in a tapered hole that will be plenty tight in there.

In fact you will most likely need what is called a pickle fork to get this apart. It is like it sounds, a fork like device that has two tapered teeth. You get a big hammer and drive the tapered ends between the two parts after the nut has been loosened.

I am guessing that Auto Zone or the likes will rent or loan you a pickle fork.

The only chassis that I have around here at the moment that I thought may resemble what you are working on is a 47 Chrysler and a quick look doesn't match what you are describing. I have looked in a couple of manuals and googled a bit and cannot find an illustration of that suspension and I don't want to confuse you any further with my guesses.

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Next time I’m underneath I’ll shoot a few shots. No worries and thanks for the advice. I’ll get back to you.

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Jack M,

I’m trying to find the thread where you gave me your address so I can send you a check for the manual you sent, Thanks so much! Could I have your address here so I can get that check off to you?

Jeff

Never mind, I just found it!

Edited by Jeffltd (see edit history)

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