Sign in to follow this  
1937hd45

Time to part with a car, with out regret....

Recommended Posts

Getting my first ride in a Antique car, a 1912 Ford when I was about 12 years old had a big effect on me. In 1983 I was able to buy it, showed & toured with it, did the 1985 Golden Jubilee Tour with AACA and some Brass Car tours. I've been its caretaker for 35 years, but haven't had it out and about in the past 20 other than a trip up the street now and then. It is part of me, I enjoy walking past it every time I'm in the garage, but really wonder with the New Year almost here if I should let it go? How have you dealt will selling a car a year or so after the fact? No right or wrong answer, just wondering what I'll be dealing with. Best wishes for the New Year! Bob 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I'd say that cars are just things.

It is the kindness of family and friends that have made

those memories enjoyable, not sheet metal and rubber.

If there's sentimental attachment to the old Ford,

then you probably want to see it go to a good home

that will use it and enjoy it.  Letting it go in that manner

will lessen any regret and will actually give you some satisfaction.

 

Even better, let it go to a younger hobbyist at a fair rate.

Then, you'll have even more satisfaction.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, no - you can't get rid of the 12 T!  I eagerly await the day you'll bring it back to Hershey and drive around in the swap meet like you used to do.  I'll bring my 14 and we'll stay over for the Hang-over tour!  No, don't even think about getting rid of the 12.  It's part of you.  I think you are suffering from winter's doldrums at the moment.  Think sun, top down, motoring along smoothly - listen to the sound of that T, doesn't it beat in synch with your heart?  Have a wee dram of single malt and think about Hershey!

Terry

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm of two opinions:

  1. Sell the car to someone who would really appreciate it and drive it regularly. Maybe someone you know in the hobby who can't really afford the car - you'll give them a partial gift and know the car will be cared for.
     
  2. Whatever money you receive from selling the car won't replace the feelings you get walking past the car in your garage - all the fond memories are something money just can't replace. Keep it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trade it in for a new car..

 

google

Couple Trades in Husband's 'Dream' 1966 Ford Mustang for a New Audi S5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, I sold off several big cars that weren’t getting used much, and the room, cash, and insurance expense were all great benefits. Problem with a T is you don’t get much room or cash when you sell it. Besides T’s will always sell quickly if priced at market. Not much up side to selling it, and lots of down side if it’s you only brass car. If you do sell it, it’s easily replaced. Since a T can sit for years, and be ready to tour with about five hours work, I say let it sit.

 

PS- My 15 T has been laid up for two years, and has another two to go. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My strategy has been if I haven't played with it for a year, be it car or tractor, it's gone.

A good '12 correct T should be worth between 14-17K now.

I helped a friend sell this survivor '12 Touring T a few years ago.

 

 

It finally sold to a well known T collector who absolutely knew its worth  which is how I am basing my numbers.

I doubt it will gain value sitting in your shed.

Sell it knowing it may see the light of day more frequently....... ;) 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regrets, ive had a few, but then again, too few to mention... 😆

 

Well, maybe trading my pretty nice 56 Chevy for a POS Corvette in the 80s, and maybe selling my 39 Packard, but otherwise it was about right to move the 15 or so hobby cars sold or traded over the years.  Like the T, the cars I noted are replaceable I suppose.  

 

The question Bob, is what is your motivation?  We have sold to get other cars before which has usually been good.  Or maybe free up funds for another project?  

 

All I can say is obvious, i would think long and hard first.  That way your more likely to be happy.  My two regrets were more or less spontanious, which leads to a regret more often.

Edited by Steve_Mack_CT (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you need the space and money Bob, let it go.

 

I've sold stuff that I've owned for decades and if you asked me way back when I would have told you I was going to be buried in the car.   1 month, 2 months, a year later I had zero regrets.   

 

In fact,  the only thing I ever get a twinge of regret about was a part and not an entire car.   This thing went to a much better home where it will be reunited with an original blown car,  but every once in a while I think about it wistfully.

 

http://home.townisp.com/~alsancle/StutzSuperCharger.html

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob if you do decide to sell you should ask your family for their opinion first. I sold my 13 that I had for over 25 years that was sitting idle for some time. My boys grew up with that car around and let me know after it was gone.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, it is never easy selling something that you have enjoyed for so many years. All sorts of emotions enter into play. I sold a beautiful original Model A two years ago that I purchased in 1976 and the feelings ranged from joy to root canal work. The best part was selling it to a young man in a small town that wanted to keep it original and join the AACA. Now that is refreshing. Happy New Year everyone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My rule of thumb is that prior to selling something I drive it for a spring and summer (and possibly fall), but I get it out and drive it - first it is a double check as to if I want to sell it and second it is best value wise to have a car up and running (and more so running than "it runs in the garage, but you cannot drive it on street or on major streets"). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It has been my experience, both personally and professionally, that the fear of regret is far greater than the actual regret. Many people sell cars that they're reluctant to sell or to which they have a strong emotional attachment. But when they're gone, they often feel relief. I have personally experienced this selling my own cars, too--once they're gone, you don't really think about them again, at least, not with any regret or unhappiness. You have pleasant memories of it, but the car being in other hands won't make you sad and the money doesn't hurt. I often feel guilt seeing a car just sitting, unwinding, rotting, and realize that it's in the car's best interest to have a caretaker who will use and enjoy it, even if that person isn't me (which, if it's sitting, it obviously shouldn't be). 

 

As Melanie frequently says to people in this situation: It won't be any less beautiful if someone else owns it.

Edited by Matt Harwood (see edit history)
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

It has been my experience, both personally and professionally, that the fear of regret is far greater than the actual regret. Many people sell cars that they're reluctant to sell or to which they have a strong emotional attachment. But when they're gone, they often feel relief. I have personally experienced this selling my own cars, too--once they're gone, you don't really think about them again, at least, not with any regret or unhappiness. You have pleasant memories of it, but the car being in other hands won't make you sad and the money doesn't hurt. I often feel guilt seeing a car just sitting, unwinding, rotting, and realize that it's in the car's best interest to have a caretaker who will use and enjoy it, even if that person isn't me (which, if it's sitting, it obviously shouldn't be). 

 

As Melanie frequently says to people in this situation: It won't be any less beautiful if someone else owns it.

Wise words !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

It is part of me, I enjoy walking past it every time I'm in the garage, but really wonder with the New Year almost here if I should let it go? How have you dealt will selling a car a year or so after the fact? No right or wrong answer, just wondering what I'll be dealing with. Best wishes for the New Year! Bob 

 

Bob,

I'm in a somewhat similar situation but with three cars that Dad gifted to me while alive and that all of them I grew up with...

It's as much about the good memories now every time I look at them more than driving as they all require mechanical work (and time) to some degree. Having 9 cars for too long has it's issues cost wise and has been affordable so far but... 

Now that it has been almost two years since Dad has passed I have discussed with Mom about possibly selling the Nash and she understands what it means to me (and her) but has said that it is likely the right thing to do. At just turning 91, still driving her van and living at home her opinion is not a feeble minded answer.

 

I guess what I'm saying is, for me it is a start to accept the time is coming to simplify my life and regardless of the money or the feelings, to accept just letting things go. I will always have those memories and be able to enjoy what I still have as long as it makes sense at the time.

I try to look at it as a chapter in the book of my life. New books can be written and new adventures can still be made.

 

Best Wishes to you for 2019 and on your decision.

Doug 

 

820817460_1951Nash-Windsor1998plus1920Overland1928Whippet1965Covair-Copy.thumb.jpg.8e634644549944e924dc08b4ee19247c.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had many collector cars since my very first car, a collector car, 1929 Studebaker Commander sedan, was purchased when I was 16. 

It has been my experience that the level of regret is in direct proportion to the level of motivation for selling.  If you have a valid need to sell you might have some twinges of regret mixed with fond memories.   If you have no real motivation to sell then you will have a stronger level of regret mixed with kicking yourself if in the rear for selling. 

When my wife, and I, first got married I had several collector cars one was a 1957 Cadillac Coupe deVille.   The Cadillac had less than 30,000 original miles and was a mint garage kept car.   It has been my only Cadillac.   When my wife and I got married we started out our marriage building a house in a rural area on five acres.   We were trying to keep from having a big mortgage by doing a lot of the work ourselves and paying as we go.   The house was done and ready for occupancy except for one critical missing piece.  We did not have a septic system.   We could not come up with the over $4,000 needed to have one installed.   The needs of the family outweighed the love of the Cadillac coupe deVille.   I sold the Cadillac for what was needed to install a septic system.  Sure I miss the Cadillac, but the needs of the family took the sting off of selling a car I loved at the time. 

The 1929 Studebaker Commander that I bought when I was 16 I sold 25 years later.  I swore I would never sell it, however, I sold it to get a 1929 Studebaker President that I now have.  Replacing one collector car for another that I wanted even more healed the sting of regret. 

The bottom line, sell if you have a valid reason that you can live with, otherwise, keep the Ford Model T.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, nick8086 said:

Trade it in for a new car..

 

google

Couple Trades in Husband's 'Dream' 1966 Ford Mustang for a New Audi S5

Although not really gemaine to the thread I just want to add that I once had a Sales Manager offer to trade me even up a 3 year old at the time Sarurn Vue for my 1980 Volare. I just laughed and never regreted not doing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Mark Huston said:

 

 I sold it to get a 1929 Studebaker President that I now have.  Replacing one collector car for another that I wanted even more healed the sting of regret. 

  

By the way, that is a great President Club Sedan you have !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think what some of us are defining as regrets here are being confused with wistful memories of days gone by through rose coloured glasses.  What I mean by that is I have often thought it would be nice to have back the first car I ever owned or one similar to it, a 67 Mercury Cougar.  Well a couple months ago my old car turned up on Craigslist at a reasonable price and looked like the condition it was in was savable, but still would be another project.  I pondered back and forth “do I need it?”  I think my wife thought I should just go bring it home and friends told her it would be a nice Christmas gift.  Here I was, at the moment some of us dream about, the chance to get my old car back and I just couldn’t justify it because I have now built up a small collection of vehicles which most would agree are more desirable than the Cougar, and the project I’m focusing on now is a Model A coupe which was my fathers first car.

 And there poses another question, would you rather have your father’s first car or your own?

So to me these car collecting decisions aren’t really regrets, a regret is watching your Falcon Convertible reverse itself down the driveway with the door open after it fell out of Park, and watching the door buckle back against the fender.  But that’s another story... Happy New Year everyone!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  I should not talk since I have so much stuff to clear out. However, although I have a love/hate relationship with selling off cars, I have no other option, otherwise, someday, my kids will be stuck in the exact same spot I am in now and it's no joke. I am only in my mid 40s so I can handle the job now but I can't imagine being stuck doing this when I'm 70 or 80. Now that is scary. I once felt that the longer you hold off on selling, the harder it becomes. Now, I feel totally different. I am very relieved and feel like a ton of bricks fall off my back when I do sell off some cars. The newly opened up yard/garage space also opens up space in your head. As for some of you guys who are thinking of selling a car you have had for decades? Why would you want to part with it now? Do you enjoy driving it? If not, do you still enjoy looking at it in your garage? Unless you need the money or if you are overloaded with stuff, there is no real reason to sell it. As collectors, we always feel a bit sorry when a car moves to a new home. This is in our nature but we get on with new things. I once sold a car that I was totally crazy about. I needed the money to buy a new tow truck so I let the car go. I had such regret that I tracked down the car a year later and bought it back. This was the only time I bought a car twice. I think.... 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On December 31, 2018 at 11:49 AM, Matt Harwood said:

 the fear of regret is far greater than the actual regret...once they're gone, you don't really think about them again, at least, not with any regret or unhappiness.

 

Agree with Matt.  He expressed exactly what I was going to say.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Akstraw said:

 

Agree with Matt.  He expressed exactly what I was going to say.

 

I tend to agree.

However, We all have at least one that we regret selling. Don't try and gloss that over with denial.

We all have at least one that got sold when we were broke or lost storage. Whatever the reason..

Mine was the Amphicar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This reminds me of a famous quote from GumBall Rally:

 

Franco:
And now my friend, the first-a rule of Italian driving.

[Franco rips off his rear-view mirror and throws it out of the car]

Franco:
What's-a behind me is not important.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, JACK M said:

 

I tend to agree.

However, We all have at least one that we regret selling. Don't try and gloss that over with denial.

We all have at least one that got sold when we were broke or lost storage. Whatever the reason..

Mine was the Amphicar.

I also agree, the ones I was forced by one circumstance or another to sell are the ones I definitely regret. 1953 Canadian Chevy 210 convertible , I am unsure of production number but it wasn't all that many, 1972 TVR 2500 "hybrid"  one of 96 transition models that used the improved " M" series chassis with the soon to be updated for bigger bumpers etc. original Vixen body. 

 I would have a very hard time replacing either . Both are quite rare and sales are few and far between, and both have price tags these days that would be a definite obstacle.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My perspective might be different than most as I consider myself a minority in that I am under 40 and have a love for brass cars.  Being a single father (full time) a brass car is a toy that is unobtanium.  The best I can hope for is to collect small pieces over time and hopefully get enough to build a car investing a little as I can, so far I have been collecting for about 20 years.  Every piece I acquire is gold as I know that nothing more is being made and prices are not getting any cheaper.    There may be a time in the far future when I am older and need to part with this car.  At that time knowing that I will never get the time and money invested out of it and it will be a one of a kind I would rather see it go to a good home than make money on it.  The other option would be to exchange it for something that I could enjoy more.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this