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What is the car hauling the Wright Flyer?

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Looks like about a 1907 or 1908 Packard to me. This 1908 has the extra wood on the dashboard for the windshield.

1908 Packard.jpg

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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Yes, I did consider Packard by the shape of the radiator, but or mystery car's radiator looks to be well forward of the front axle.

 

I think it is not a big car - more Ford T size. Maybe 105 to 110" wheelbase?

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Look at the shape of the front seat divider and the round piece of wood trim below the seat.  Looks like a match to me although it could be a different model.  The white one is a seven passenger but I don't think the old one is.

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1 hour ago, mike6024 said:

Looks like the radiator has a name, of sorts, across the middle of it. Or just a couple letters. Can't make anything out. Maybe looks like "A IN"? Save the picture to your computer desktop, open it with your photo viewer, blow it up, and turn up contrast and brightness on your monitor. You can see the front suspension better that way too.

 

I have only just done that, but the script on the radiator is still not readily readable. The radiator has hints of Stoddard-Dayton in shape but the hood is wrong.

 

The front suspension looks odd - maybe it has a transverse spring? 

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Initially thought logo looked a bit like Knox but is not. Aerocar seems close, and hubs seem to match. Most confusing is the Packardalike radiator. I have only been able to trace one  Packardalike photo and this from one source with various conflicting stuff on the internet. Aerocar production only 1906 to 1908 so should not be difficult to nail down the model from five ! Presumably, if one, probably a Model F. Most model F photos show lots of louvres. This one seems to have no louvres?  Interesting One! 

 

Vintman

 

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Thanks, however a lovly picture of the typical curved bonnet top. No Packardalike features?

 

By the way, interesting studded type repair gaiter on the front passenger wheel on our photo !

 

Vintman

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Here is another advertisement, from the Wikipedia article about Aerocar:

image.png.e3bdaf197ed3100adedc9e2e639913d3.png

The radiator surround is different as is the hood shape. The body lines are different, as they are in the other advertisement referenced above. This one also has no badge on the radiator. So it is not a Model A.

 

The 1908 models could have either an air or water cooled engine. The OP is most like a model D in body. No louvres may mean it is an air cooled version. But the radiator shape is still wrong.

Edited by Spinneyhill (see edit history)

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The Aerocar photo (from Spinneyhill) and the unknown car both appear to have radiator caps.

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There is some interesting stuff on the page in the link at the bottom of the mtfc page I posted the link to my post above.

 

Here it is again - http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/414769.html?1389546760

 

And the next link - http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/411944/412574.html?1389576934

 

I hadn't bothered to notice the radiator cap on the OP car - a good point. It seems Aerocar made a variety of models. I can imagine the air cooled ones may have run into trouble in hot weather where there was no wind - maybe?

 

The white car in the mtfc link - which is air cooled and noted as a Model E - appears to not have a radiator cap. A pity there is no photo taken from the front.

 

I am still mystified by the front suspension on the OP car. The radiator on that one is mounted well forward though and maybe obscures the front dumb irons??

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The attached link discusses the Aerocar and Ford links, however, some of the details might be incorrect eg the model F having a wheelbase of 151 inches and hp of 45 which could be typos. As for the OP car having no louvres in the bonnet I suggest that this is merely because of the poor photo. The photo in this link appears to be identical with the one from the Early American Automobile site.

 

 

http://www.mychurchgrowth.com/blog/tag/mi/

 

 

Edited by Stude17 (see edit history)

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This was the photo I was referring to when I said   "I have only been able to trace one  Packardalike photo and this from one source with various conflicting stuff on the internet."

 

Could any Packard expert have a good look at it and determinif it was a Packard and has been misnamed.

 

Vintman

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I have it on authority from a brass car expert that the car is an Elmore, a 2-cycle automobile, circa 1906-7......

 

It's not a Packard.....

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Playing around with the original photo in an editing program, it sure looks to me like the radiator script is almost certainly 'Aerocar.'

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The factory photograph of  a 1906 Elmore is not a close match to the unknown car.  Note the hood sides.

 

1906 Elmore.jpg

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According to one source, "By 1907 the Aerocar Model F fitted with a four-cylinder 45 hp water-cooled engine was introduced" and I think that's what the OP's car is. My searches indicate the air-cooled Aerocars had completely different hoods and 'radiators' compared to the Model F.

 

The pic Spinneyhill posted is clearly a Model F to my eye.

 

Incidentally, this Aerocar marque was the company Alexander Malcomson started after he was run off from the Ford Motor Company. 

 

Here's another photo of an Aerocar Model F.

1907-Aerocar-Model-F-40-hp.jpg

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The only difference I see is the dashboard. It looks to be a curved metal unit on the F and not wood like on the car in question.

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On a car this early which almost certainly was produced in very small numbers, I don't find that to be a big concern.

 

The distinctive radiator script in the OP's image, as grainy as it is, along with the radiator and hood contours, seal the deal for me. I'm believing Aerocar Model F.

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