mitchwhodge

1954 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country

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I have a 1954 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country with a V8 engine, this car has not been run or started in decades , there is no battery. What would the original factory specs be? Positive or negative ground? 6V or 12V

 

Would really appreciate some tips on this before I hook a  battery up and see what happens

 

Thank you,

 

Mitch

mitchwhodge@yahoo.com

Edited by mitchwhodge
error in spelling (see edit history)

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I am not sure of the year but the Imperials went to 12 volts earlier than 56 like the rest of the Mopars.

I think on the A/C cars.

Could a Town and Country have come with a 331 Hemi?

I would take a look at the generator tag to decide the voltage on this one.

 

Assuming its original.

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If push comes to shove, you can always remove a sealed beam and look at the back to see if it is 6 or 12 volt. But, as stated, it should be 6V positve

Edited by CarlLaFong (see edit history)

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As originally equipped, the 1954 New Yorker T&C Wagon came with 6-volt positive ground electric system.  The New Yorker did, indeed, come standard with the 180 HP 331 cubic inch V-8.  The Windsor T&C, on the other hand, had the inline 6-cylinder.

 

This is not to say this car's electric system could not have been altered in some way, but, I would expect that if it hasn't ran in decades, it most likely retains the original electrics.  I owned one of these for several years.  It was a fantastic car, and I regret selling it.

Edited by Dosmo (see edit history)

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Hi Mitch, and welcome to AACA forums !! You are in very good hands here. Not knowing your experience level, I have to state categorically and emphatically that there are a number of things you ABSOLUTELY MUST do BEFORE you "hook a battery up" to an engine which has not been started in decades, "and see what happens". Although EXTREMELY unlikely, the very worst thing that could happen would be if the engine actually started. The damage could be extensive, even catastrophic. Varying degrees of lesser damage would be probable depending on how much movement was done, even without starting, without proper preparation. How aware of this are you ? Don't worry, you have just hooked up with the greatest car guys particularly suited to help you right down to every turn of the wrench if need be. Please let us know a bit more about yourself and your car(s) and skillsets. The better to help you. Glad you joined us.   -  Carl 

Edited by C Carl
Add word "actually" (see edit history)
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1 hour ago, C Carl said:

Hi Mitch, and welcome to AACA forums !! You are in very good hands here. Not knowing your experience level, I have to state categorically and emphatically that there are a number of things you ABSOLUTELY MUST do BEFORE you "hook a battery up" to an engine which has not been started in decades, "and see what happens". Although EXTREMELY unlikely, the very worst thing that could happen would be if the engine actually started. The damage could be extensive, even catastrophic. Varying degrees of lesser damage would be probable depending on how much movement was done, even without starting, without proper preparation. How aware of this are you ? Don't worry, you have just hooked up with the greatest car guys particularly suited to help you right down to every turn of the wrench if need be. Please let us know a bit more about yourself and your car(s) and skillsets. The better to help you. Glad you joined us.   -  Carl 

C Carl is correct.

Before you try to turn the engine over or start the car here are a few tips:

1. Drain the oil and drop the oil pan and clean the pick-up and the pan - there is probably a good amount of sludge. Change the oil filter. Refill engine with new oil

2. Drain the radiator and the engine block - flush them out to remove rust and other stuff. Change the thermostat, hoses, etc. Refill with new antifreeze

3. Remove all of the spark plugs (label the wires so you know where they go) and squirt oil/WD 40 into each cylinder. Then turn the engine over - BY HAND - for several revolutions and then do it over again. Do this with the plugs out - it's easier to turn the engine.

4. Either clean the plugs,points,rotor and cap OR better yet just get new ones.

5. You might want to also remove the valve covers and pour some oil over the entire valve train. This will lubricate all of the rockers, etc and avoid them being "dry" when you go to start the car.

6. When all of the above are done and everything is back together you should crank the engine over for about 15-20 seconds or so, with the starter, BEFORE actually trying to get it to start so that you develop some oil pressure - if there is an oil gauge watch it as you are cranking the engine to see if pressure registers. Doing this will get oil to all of the moving parts before starting the car. (HINT - you can do this with the plugs out, too. It is less strain on the battery and starter)

7. Be patient as rushing into things could be - as stated above - VERY costly.

 

BTW, I have some parts for your car - I will send you an email.

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10 hours ago, Joe Cocuzza said:

3. Remove all of the spark plugs (label the wires so you know where they go) and squirt oil/WD 40 into each cylinder. Then turn the engine over - BY HAND - for several revolutions and then do it over again. Do this with the plugs out - it's easier to turn the engine.

I would disagree slightly with this step. Rather than squirt WD40 into each cylinder, I get a funnel with a small hose attached, stick the hose in the sparkplug hole & pour the WD40 in (more is better in this case). Let it sit a week & do it again. Then try turning the engine over by hand. Drain the oil/WD40 & add fresh oil & filter.

Doing it this way may free up any frozen rings. BTW, if you drop the oil pan to clean up sludge, then don't put in fresh oil until you've gone through the above process

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1 hour ago, George Smolinski said:

I would disagree slightly with this step. Rather than squirt WD40 into each cylinder, I get a funnel with a small hose attached, stick the hose in the sparkplug hole & pour the WD40 in (more is better in this case). Let it sit a week & do it again. Then try turning the engine over by hand. Drain the oil/WD40 & add fresh oil & filter.

Doing it this way may free up any frozen rings. BTW, if you drop the oil pan to clean up sludge, then don't put in fresh oil until you've gone through the above process

Can't argue that. I usually do it your way but I neglected to mention the soaking part.  

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